Homefront: The Revolution ends with a message from its chief developer to players acknowledging the game's troubled development.

Before the credits roll the player is presented with a message from Hasit Zala, studio head of Dambuster.

"Homefront the revolution has been in development for just over four years and as some of you may be aware the path has not always been a smooth one," the message begins.

Zala mentions Homefront: The Revolution was rebooted multiple times as the developer struggled to survive.

Homefront: The Revolution was developed by Nottingham studio Dambuster, which is owned by Deep Silver parent company Koch Media.

Dambuster was once Crytek UK and owned by CryEngine maker Crytek. But the developer was sold to Koch Media after Crytek ran into financial difficulties.

Before then, Crytek UK was developing Homefront for THQ before the publisher went bust.

Going back even further, Crytek UK was once called Free Radical Design, creator of the TimeSplitters games (two levels of TimeSplitters 2 are in Homefront: The Revolution as a cool Easter egg).

Free Radical Design went into administration and was bought by Crytek in 2009, then renamed Crytek UK.

So yeah, it's been a long journey for Dambuster and Homefront: The Revolution. But has it been worth it? The game launched this week to middling reviews. In our Homefront review, Johnny Chiodini said the game "boasts solid gameplay and impressive level design, but tonally it's a disaster".

What next for the developer? Well, there's downloadable content for Homefront to be made and released. Then? Many hope Dambuster will be given the chance to make a new TimeSplitters game.

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Wesley Yin-Poole

Wesley Yin-Poole

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