A tarted-up version of Grand Theft Auto: Liberty City Stories is out on iOS that runs in 60 frames-per-second if you have an iPhone 6s/6s Plus or an iPad Pro. If you have an iPhone 5/5s it runs normally, presumably in 30fps, and if you have an iPhone 4/4s it won't run at all.

Other features include new high resolution textures and character art, better draw distance and custom soundtracks. There's support for 3D Touch, cross-platform saves and physical controllers if the touch-screen controls don't do it for you.

Liberty City Stories was originally a PSP game that was "fresh and tight" next to the bloated San Andreas, which was the most recent GTA game at that point. Rockstar ported LCS to PS2 a year later, where it was welcome but unremarkable.

Liberty City Stories costs 4.99.

This is what it used to look like. I loved the old GTA block-hands - watch how they grip objects and flap around when people talk.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

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Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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