Looks like we missed out on a non-Lego Jurassic World video game, the fossilised remains of which are being uncovered now.

Assets showing impressive 3D-rendered dinosaurs and film star Chris Pratt surfaced and were then removed - preserved in the museum of NeoGAF (via Kotaku) - strengthening reports about the game first aired months ago. A Jurassic World fansite found them as well as related employment records on artists' resumes.

One artist referred to the "unannounced project" as in development at Cryptic Studios (Perfect World) in Seattle, which tallies with earlier reports about where the game was in development. "I created numerous creatures from scratch, and helped out with assets/textures for an open-world environment," it said.

Another artist apparently mentioned that the unannounced project was a downloadable Steam/PlayStation Network/Xbox Live game built with Unreal Engine 4.

The Jurassic World fansite doesn't mention names or link to the artist's websites - although there's a link on NeoGAF - apparently at the artists' requests, which suggests this really was A Thing.

Cryptic Studios - creator of Star Trek Online, Champions Online and a long time ago, City of Heroes - was bought by Perfect World in 2011. It's now responsible for Neverwinter, an action-heavy MMO available on PC and Xbox One.

So what would this Jurassic World game have been like? The unverified report from months ago suggests it was gunning for something similar to H1Z1, which is a zombie survival game. But the existence of a Chris Pratt character suggests we would fill his protagonist boots rather than be a nobody in a world filled with other players. Then again, does single-player really fit with the MMO portfolio Cryptic has?

pratt
Those eyes are very Paul Newman.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.