Does Kingdom ring a bell? Apparently it's all I write about now. It's the charmingly retro-styled side-on game about building a kingdom that can hold out against baddies. It doesn't explain itself because working it out is the game, and it's fiendishly compelling. I recommend it. Right now, however, all you can play it on is PC (Windows, Linux) and Mac.

But early next year you will be able to play it on Xbox One, announced teeny-tiny publisher Raw Fury today. And there I was thinking mobile platforms would come first! They are, incidentally, still part of the plan.

There are no other details about Kingdom on Xbox One, not that I expect there's much else to say. Presumably it'll benefit from all the tweaks and extra development the game will receive on PC, but beyond that should be, well, the same game.

Kingdom came out last week on PC and Mac and sold well enough to pay for development in one day. "That's right," wrote Raw Fury on its website, "in the first 24 hours after being released, Kingdom became profitable."

What this means for you as an owner of the game is that every update "no matter how big or small" will be free. "This means no paid DLCs for the PC version here," Raw Fury said. That's to thank you for your early support of the game and company.

Kingdom's success also means the game's developers Noio and Licorice "get what they deserve" and can "enjoy the financial fruits of their labour", while staying independent, and that the game can be patched, tweaked and bolstered with new content. "Finally," Raw Fury added, "it means that this publishing thing can indeed be done a bit differently - just like we imagined when we took our first steps on this crazy journey."

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About the author

Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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