The PC (Windows) beta for Wasteland 2, one of the first massive successes on Kickstarter, is finally here. (Linux and Mac versions are in the works but need more testing first.)

InXile announced that backers can log-in to their Ranger Center accounts and grab a Steam key now.

Everyone else will have to wait until paid Steam Early Access opens, "which we will do after our backers have had a crack at it", explained Brian Fargo, "leader in exile" as he styles himself.

For those testing Wastleand 2 there's a hefty list of caveats. In short: the game isn't quite finished. There are plenty of "t"s that need crossing and "I"s that need dotting.

"Creating a deep RPG is a unique challenge," Fargo wrote, "in that so many elements need to be working well together, with 95 per cent of the game's underpinnings complete before beta can begin, which is what we've all been working so hard on this last month.

"Now, however, is the stage of development where the magic happens. With most of the mechanical issues behind us, now we can really start digging deep into the game and finding ways of taking it from good to great. No amount of prepping and planning can replace old-fashioned hands-on playing, testing and iteration time, which is why we are so grateful to have you, our backers, help us hone this process like never before.

"We've all been pouring our heart and soul into Wasteland 2," he concluded, "and I hope it shows. I'll never forget the elation from those first two days of our Kickstarter campaign and how happy I was to get this chance. Now, after the long journey, I am filled with excitement and nervousness."

Press coverage of the beta is welcomed, and we'll share our thoughts just as soon as we can.

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Robert Purchese

Robert Purchese

Senior Staff Writer

Bertie is senior staff writer and Eurogamer's Poland-and-dragons correspondent. He's part of the furniture here, a friendly chair, and reports on all kinds of things, the stranger the better.

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