A new Assassin's Creed comic series will offer hints at the future of the franchise beyond this year's pirate-themed entry, Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag.

The India-set adventure, named Assassin's Creed: Brahman, will star a new present day assassin and include flashback scenes to the 1800s, when Britain ruled the region.

"We wanted to do something different - tell a type of story never before seen in the Assassin's Creed universe - and touch on corners of the brand not yet explored by the video games," Brahman writer Brenden Fletcher explained in an interview published on Ubisoft's UbiArt site.

"Brahman answers a lot of questions and opens a ton of new doors. Fans who want to know what the future holds for Assassin's Creed beyond Back Flag would be advised to give it a read! Hint! Hint!"

Black Flag will round off the narrative arc of the Kenways, begun in last year's AC3. Beyond that, we know that Ubisoft is already working on the 2014 Assassin's Creed, which series co-creator Jade Raymond's Ubisoft Toronto studio is helping develop.

Brahman is being developed by Karl Kerlsch and Cameron Stewart, co-creators of the Russian Revolution-set comics Assassin's Creed: The Fall and The Chain.

The new historical assassin star is Arbaaz Mir, who must "face down a foe who subjugated his land and people" - a Brit, perhaps? - "who's now in possession of an artefact that may be a very powerful Piece of Eden". The story will also follow his modern day descendant Jot Soora, who now works as a programmer at Templar-run company Abstergo.

Ubisoft has released a few sample pages which culminate in a bushy-moustached Brit meeting the sharp end of Mir's dagger. Boo.

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Tom Phillips

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