thisisatempaccount Comments

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  • Reddit drama prompts gaming boards to shut themselves down

  • thisisatempaccount 03/07/2015

    A large number of gaming websites - including the huge Gawker septic tank Kotaku - have removed user access and set themselves to private, effectively shutting themselves down.

    Other high-profile gaming websites to go dark include IGN, Eurogamer, Buzzfeed and Yahoo.com/user_groups/multimedia/toys_and_videogames.html.

    The downtime is part of a protest affecting hundreds of games journalists - including some of the web's biggest - that follows the closing of a popular subreddit where they got all their news.

    Subreddit r/gaming, real name Vic-20a, was a key resource for the journalists' popular jobs board - "I'm hungover, commission me anything" - which regularly allows them to copy and paste thinly veiled marketing copy, people with interesting or high-profile videogame birthday cakes, or just those who have had notable experiences to shill.

    r/gaming was closed shortly after a controversial Reddit AMA with EU consumer rights activist Luke Smith, although reports differ over whether this was the direct cause.

    Eurogamer had also expressed its dislike at the rise in r/gaming posts for non-commercial reasons - for example with users talking about common experiences, old games or anything not in the usable news cycle. Its posting history for the next [sub: insert however long it takes for r/gaming to come back up here, I'd check myself but Xur just updated so I gotta go] has now been suspended.

    The news feeds for topics such as Destiny, List Videos, Destiny, Reviews of that One Mobile Game Everyone's Playing, Destiny, Stealth Destiny and Fanboy Bating Hardware Comparisons are all now dormant, among singles of others.

    MrTomFTW has responded to the situation over thirty times.

    ;D
    Reply +12
  • Keiji Inafune: video gaming's harshest critic

  • thisisatempaccount 03/07/2015

    Good thing this brave, no-comprises character concept artist is going to save the industry with his innovative new clone of a 30 year old game, then.. Reply +2
  • Miiverse getting redesign this summer

  • thisisatempaccount 01/07/2015

    I'm not really keen on these changes. Activity feeds are the central hub of a user, the thing you visit if you find someone who shares interests with you, and therefore one of the few things about the service that offer a foothold of permanence and genuine connection amid the endless stream of posts. I've seen a lot of concern that the 30 day limit is going to see a lot less discussion between users, because people will save their quota for their own posts and not answer other people's questions they randomly see, etc. Personally I don't make anything like 30 posts a day.

    All in all it strongly seems that Nintendo are on intent 'walling in' their users, like they're determined to prevent as much meaningful interaction between them as they possibly can. I can't help but feel that's an odd direction to take for your, y'know, social network.

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-65DyTxSM8UY/VOQSX4is3TI/AAAAAAAAAdE/bNRf5fosRR0/s1600/BlackMirror1x02_0023.jpg
    Reply +5
  • The Taken King is the expansion Destiny has been waiting for

  • thisisatempaccount 01/07/2015

    "How does Bungie change up the enemies you face without creating entirely new ones?"

    Wait.. you mean they don't? Not only is this expansion the price of the base game, it doesn't even come with any new enemies?

    "You'll have to figure things out, turn to your friends for help, maybe even the internet."

    They're spinning wiki-crawling, a staple (not to say crutch) of the genre since Meridian 59, as a bold new feature?

    "evergreen"

    The most astonishingly double-think synonym for "you will grind this stale content until it is finer than talcum powder" I have ever seen a developer summon up the brass balls to say.

    "Our proper nouns - The Darkness, The Nine - represent seeds of a plant that we would like to pour water on and grow. "

    So they're now admitting they launched an entire game with a bunch of generic place-holders where the actual narrative should have been? Okay.

    EG.. do Bungie.. do they have your families, or something? You don't have to say anything, we know they might be listening. Just blink twice. We'll get you the help you need.
    Reply +41
  • Mojang is shuttering development on its card combat game Scrolls

  • thisisatempaccount 29/06/2015

    Can't have a studio running more than one property i̶n̶t̶o̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶g̶r̶o̶u̶n̶d at the same time. Silly Mojang, that's not how AAA development works!*

    *Unless you're Platinum
    Reply +14
  • Destiny: The Taken King director apologises, Collector's Edition content will now be sold separately

  • thisisatempaccount 25/06/2015

    £20! That's big of them!

    They're apologising with a bouquet of dead flowers and a postcard written in dried turd...
    Reply +8
  • Destiny: The Taken King promotional Red Bull quest and bonus XP detailed

  • thisisatempaccount 24/06/2015

    Satire is dead. Reply +2
  • Digital Foundry vs Xbox One backwards compatibility

  • thisisatempaccount 20/06/2015

    "The emulator supports both digital downloads and original DVDs, though discs simply act as a key, the core data downloading over the internet via Xbox Live."

    This is the really interesting part for me. People were saying Sony could never copy this move, giving free PS Now access for owners of PS3 games, because it would cost too much in terms of bandwidth and infrastructure. But Microsoft are actually taking that route instead of pulling the data from the discs. Obviously it's an issue of streaming vs a one-time download, but as its still does have the side effect of making Sony look stingier for not providing a similar offering.

    On the other hand, I'm still uncertain, are they tying access to all this to having a XBL Gold account? If so then they're not really being honest when they suggest it's 'for free'.

    I guess the other big caveat would be, how many games are actually going to show up on this?
    Reply -2
  • The E3 Bulletin: Thursday

  • thisisatempaccount 18/06/2015

    I don't get the angst about Samus not being in Federation Force. Most IPs in gaming are criminally underused IMO, going to enormous lengths of worldbuilding in the seminal, landmark titles, only to spend the next X games forcing the main character to retread minor variations of the same plot over and over in sequels, and prequels, and trilogies of five...

    Why not let developers poke around the other corners of these much-loved galaxies, looking for new stories, unfamiliar faces and fresh inspiration? Why constantly insist that the hero never gets their hard earned bit of kip (/PTSD), but instead ploughs onwards into an interminable future of ever-more (and ever-more wearisome) conflict?
    Reply +1
  • Nostalgia and experiment meet in Star Fox Zero

  • thisisatempaccount 16/06/2015

    I'm not really bothered whether it has all of the graphics or merely some of them. This isn't a series that found fame for its visuals, but rather in the spectacle of its set-pieces and space battles and the finely-tuned arcade thrills of its rail-shooting. This looks like the first proper sequel Star Fox has gotten since the N64, and I can't wait to play it.

    It doesn't look like a simple retread, either - the gyroscopic controls are a bold move that might well pay off, they've proven with Splatoon that it can work if handled properly, and the vehicle transformation looks like a system being taken to an natural next step from Lylat Wars' tank and sub levels and the Arwing's all-range mode.

    It was an underwhelming showing from Nintendo for sure, I was really hoping for a few new announcements, but we shouldn't let our disappointment sweep us up into such a froth that even the good stuff they had to show this year somehow becomes tainted. This, Mario Maker and Xenoblade Chronicles X all look the business, and SMT vs Fire Emblem and Mario and Luigi: Paper Jam both look decent as well.
    Reply +7
  • Street Fighter's Ryu and Fire Emblem's Roy headed to Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Wii U

  • thisisatempaccount 14/06/2015

    Those prices! The hell, Nintendo? Reply +4
  • Triple-A is back at E3 2015

  • thisisatempaccount 13/06/2015

    AAA? More like ZZZ, am I right? :L

    :L

    :|

    I'll get my coat.
    Reply +16
  • Nintendo heads into E3 with its hands tied

  • thisisatempaccount 12/06/2015

    I too have been puzzled by the strategy surrounding Splatoon's post-release DLC. On reflection I reckon it's been a very deliberate series of moves, made with the intention not only to keep the server populations stable, but moreover to keep gamers *having fun*.

    I know that sounds counter-intuitive, but look at it this way. The promise of new modes or weapons is a great reason to keep coming back to a game, which is why the COD formula (really the BF2 formula, but let's not split hairs) put content gates behind xp treadmills in the first place - to retain player engagement after the initial thrill of the game wears off. But we've seen how badly powergamers tear up these carefully-plotted progressions curves that developers so painfully stake out. Thus, separating some content drops from the level grind discourages people from the 'gotta reach 20' mentality - which distracts from the intrinsic joy of playing, and instead ties to the experience a more tense, impatient sort of emotion.

    What I think Nintendo is at least trying to do is prevent the burnout that can result from straining too hard at the leash of progression. Other developers like Bungie have gone in the opposite direction, doubling or tripling down (not actually a phrase, sue me) on that extrinsic drip, drip of reward pellets - thus wringing out the maximum amount of compulsion and engagement out of its similarly thin content supply. That game has become almost an economic pursuit, with players so invested in the various markets of activity and currency, so enmeshed in a sea of transaction and randomised payout, that the primary activity of the game could almost be said not to be the shooting of alien badmans but the pursuit of an ever-spiralling staircase of extrinsic reward.

    In other words, Nintendo are trying to give a reason for players to keep playing Splatoon, while also trying to prevent the sort of scenario described in this article: http://killscreendaily.com/articles/we-are-slaves-destiny/

    Another example of this is with the mechanic of being able to cash a winning streak in for coins during every rotation. When I first discovered this, I was honestly kind of dismayed. Games became much more stressful, because now my precious coin-streak was on the line. I started venting my frustrations at team-mates I didn't think were pulling their weight (thank God there's no voice chat in this game!). I was sent into spirals of despair at the sight of multiple paintbrushes on my team, or players with obviously childlike names ('minecraft', you are in all probability half the age of your freshness level, but no matter. I will never forgive you for losing me my sixteenth flag. Never.)

    But then I realised Ninty had capped the value of these streaks at an almost negligible 1400 coins. It's a nice amount to receive, sure, but hardly worth losing sleep over. I could feel the weight being lifted off my shoulders. If not for this, you'd constantly have your favourite weapon and best gear equipped because fun and experimentation would take a back seat to winning at all costs, another part of the online shooter mindset that - like K/D ratios - can't help but take more and more focus away from everything else, even as it turns the fun of the game into so much anxiety, bitterness and anger.

    I agree that none of these approaches have proved a total panacea, and to be honest I don't think any dev is going to square this circle to every player's satisfaction. But I think there's more to Nintendo's thinking than EG are willing to credit, and I find their negativity unreflective of the general sentiments I've seen from the people actually playing the game.
    Reply +5
  • Splatoon sales are strong in Japan, at least

  • thisisatempaccount 11/06/2015

    Um, it's currently at no. 4 in the UK charts? Apparently the sales only dropped 50% week on week here, too, which is another indicator of strong performance (an 80% drop-off is not unusual).

    Maybe Tom should make himself a cup of tea :)
    Reply +11
  • Heroes of the Storm: free hero rotation for June 9th

  • thisisatempaccount 09/06/2015

    @Bedders Fair play mate, that's a well argued and thoroughly convincing reply. Like I said, it's mixed feelings at my end. But I don't begrudge this sort of content at all and I hope EG continues to find success with it. Reply 0
  • thisisatempaccount 09/06/2015

    I have mixed feelings whenever I see this sort of article. It's felt for quite a while now, at least a year, that Eurogamer has been - I'm not sure how to put this - sort of drawing down? Bedders says he doesn't see how else you could run a site.. I'd point him in the direction of his own archives circa 2007-2012.

    It felt like the review cycle back then really did a better job of keeping on top things, right across the board, from digital storefront games (XBLA, PSN, Virtual Console, etc) to milestone AAA titles, to mobile apps and comedy takedowns of shovelware tat. Dominant platforms like the DS and the 360 were handled with aplomb. It rarely felt like anything major would hit the zeitgeist without receiving some sort of comment or attention from EG. The expansion and acquisition of the Eurogamer network added to the sense that this was a continental operation that spanned the whole of the industry, and indeed the world.

    In those days the site really felt like the site was a one stop shop for the latest and greatest our hobby had to offer. It was an IGN with better writing, a GameSpot with better ethics, an Edge with less iconoclastic taste. Nowadays it feels a much lighter thing - an enthusiast blog, written by a small clique of similarly-minded friends who go deep on a handful of games, genres and developers, and exult in that, really double down on it.

    Now let me be clear, there's nothing wrong with that! I know EG is confident in the approach it's taking these days and I'm sure there's plenty of really good reasons doing so. For all I know, Eurogamer might well be more widely-read and successful than it's ever been. On the other hand, complaints of the sort you get in this comment section and others seem to keep cropping up, and while I agree they may not be edifying or even valuable to read, they are to me at least understandable. I think a lot of the general bemusement is just that people can remember how things were before, and to pretend that the site has ticked over in exactly the same fashion since the year dot is - difficult?
    Reply +1
  • Mega Man Legacy Collection brings original six titles to modern platforms

  • thisisatempaccount 09/06/2015

    @Der_tolle_Emil Fair cop. I think they were still evening out the classic 'Megaman difficulty' with 2. There are some really weird spikes and the game throws an insane amount of power-ups at you by way of compensation. 3 is my fave but I think a lot of that comes down to it being the first one I played. 4 is underrated but twenty years on I still can't decide whether the Mega Buster was a good or bad addition. If only it didn't make that godawful charging noise... Reply 0
  • Chip's Challenge 2 review

  • thisisatempaccount 09/06/2015

    Glad to see this get a review. The nostalgia tug is strong with this one. In fact, seeing as I never paid for those countless hours I got out of the first one (thank you, Microsoft Entertainment Pack) I think I can easily spare a few quid for someone with a name as majestic as Chuck Sommerville. (Seriously, it feels like adding an Esq. on the end should almost be mandatory.)

    I've just been on the Steam store - if anyone is tempted to get this, make sure you buy the bundle which has the first game and the level editor thrown in. Weirdly it costs the same as the sequel does on its own.

    Now, does anyone have a release date for SkiFree 2??
    Reply +8
  • 20 years on, Worms remains a comedy classic

  • thisisatempaccount 07/06/2015

    I played Worms for the first time in decades at a recent stag weekend, skunk-drunk on somebody's ipad. What really impressed me was discovering something things about it are just universal. Though we'd all grown up in times and places far-off from one another, we came together to huddle around that boxy screen, and the crowd to a man would boo and jeer when anyone reached for the blowtorch, marvel at some skilful ascent with the ninja rope or - and this was my favourite - actually climb on tiptoes when one worm approached another near a cliff with the Prod equipped. It was like we were watching Messi strolling up to take a penalty to decide the Champion's League.

    'ooooooooooooooOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOH!'

    I don't care that the game has been released so many times you'd think Team 17 were chairing a parole board. Or that when you get right down to it, It's not even THAT good of a game. But with the right group it's a peerless experience, pure chaotic hilarity, and for what's effectively a turn based strategy game that group can encompass more people than you'd think. (And yes - not that you asked - but I effing pasted the lot of them! Do not underestimate the power of the dark side!)
    Reply +9
  • Will Porter on: Getting old

  • thisisatempaccount 06/06/2015

    I don't have kids, I don't have a spouse, I work slightly less than the 37.5 hours you need to be an accepted member of respectable society, the thought of leaving the house sometimes makes me nauseous - and even I don't play anything like as many games as I see coming out that I'd want to. Six hour games sound perfect, or so I'd think.

    The problem is, when a game's good enough, like anything, you make time for it.* It MAKES you make time for it. If that makes any sense? And those are the experiences I definitely wouldn't want shaving down to under 10 hours. I want those games to last forever!

    I did, very sadly, have to turn my back on an entire (and long-loved) genre, because the thought of starting another RPG, yes, even THAT one, these just fills me with daunt and dread. But those experiences are a joy-hose for millions of people, and I'm not about to start wishing all that cherished time away just because it would personally convenience me. Not that I'm saying that's what Will was arguing, you understand, but.. there's a trade off, here. My happiness isn't your happiness.

    But filler and padding, that's never made anyone happy. That can go. I think what I'm saying is that rather than shorter games, we need better games? But shorter games are also fine, as long as they're good?

    Or something?

    * Who has the time to read all these novels? To watch these 50-hour box sets of critically acclaimed TV? It's the same deal. But a few episodes or chapters in and you couldn't imagine an evening going without a few blissfully engrossed hours. The enjoyment of good stuff doesn't have to be planned, it changes your plans without you even realising.
    Reply +41
  • Splatoon review

  • thisisatempaccount 03/06/2015

    It's the little things I love about this game.

    - The way you transform out of squid mode mid-air during a Super Jump across the map. 'Can I start blasting at people from all the way up here?', it makes you wonder. And of course you can. You'll never hit anything from that distance, of course, but it's so much fun to get into the action already blazing away and the sort of thing that suggests the developers were having as much fun making the game as you are playing it.

    - That moment at the end of a match that's been so enthralling, so intense, you never even got a chance to look at the minimap - you've no idea whether you're ahead or behind. Those games where your back has been against the wall for the entirety of the match, the whistle sounds, you take a forlorn glance at the game pad - what! - you won?! Impromptu seat dancing and/or Tim Henman fist-pumping WILL occur.

    - On the other side of the coin, games where you have been personally a one man painter-pasting phenomenon but, as you discover all too late, haven't been translating that advantage into territorial gains. The highs and lows are both equally giddy drama for what should be three throwaway minutes.

    - Squid Jump, a minigame you can play whenever you're queueing (for people to join the lobby, or the game to load), is a classic Nintendo game in miniature. It seems simple at first but, through subtle graphical cues and ingenious level design, you realise there are intricacies to master that make high-score shooting a genuine delight. Every level introduces a new quirk or element, it autosaves your progress whenever your queueing ends so you can keep going over the course of multiple rounds, and to top it off the whole thing has randomisation so you never get bored of going through the early levels.

    - I love the way that the early guns are balanced against the even meatiest high-level unlocks, and that going for something with more killing power always has a trade-off in some form or other (usually ink efficiency, a less enviable special or sub weapon or less suitability for the game's actual goal of claiming territory through paint). This is the sort of thing that People Who Can't Aim always say. Yes, I am one of them.

    - I love the aesthetic! It somehow combines effortless coolness and everyday high/low fashion with - and this is a fine line to tread - warmness and welcoming. You don't instantly feel alienated by all these precocious teens in the way that so many Japanese games' sartorial stylings, with their spiky hair and seemingly endless fascination with leather, and belts, and leather belts instantly set the eyes a-rollin'.

    - The clothing unlocks always give you something to do. Equipment can give you certain perks as you level it up, but these are randomised, so you never know when you're about to stumble across an incredible combo. I know this is something of a dark-art trick at work on my brain, all randomised reward and dopamine rush, but while some people will be forever grinding gear for that perfect optimal combo, it can also lead to fantastic surprises and experimental play.

    I would never have tried play hide-and-seek Splatoon until the level-up lottery delivered an unexpected pair of Stealth Swim/Sub Weapon Ink Efficiency/+ Bomb Range shoes into my lap. Suddenly I was spending games lurking in thin puddles on the sides of fights, popping up once the enemy had passed me to shower them from behind in a barrage of paint grenades. It wasn't any way to win a match, I discovered, but it WAS a whole lot of fun!

    - For all its soft-edges and three-minute tightness of pacing, this is competitive gaming with a capital C. There isn't a hint of Mario Kart-style rubberbanding anywhere in sight. The game is 100% deterministic - what you do in the every moment, every lane hastily painted, every scalp claimed for your side or kill fed away to the enemy, every judicious (or otherwise) use of a hard-farmed special ability will contribute to the moment-to-moment state of play, and the result at the end is always a fair reflection of the ebb and flow of that battle. Surprise comebacks are always possible and frequently do happen, but it's always your team that feeds away its advantage - the game never does it for you.
    Reply +40
  • Nintendo announces new Dr. Mario, Chibi Robo, Olympics games

  • thisisatempaccount 01/06/2015

    @Malek86 The Chibi games are lovely things. Delightful, weird and surprising. Definitely give it a go, try not to look up any spoilers before you do.

    For me, the new Dr. Mario will live or die on the quality of its Fever and Chill remixes.
    Reply +3
  • Chris Donlan on: Gaming's cruellest downgrade

  • thisisatempaccount 23/05/2015

    I think you can oversell this argument. There's absolutely no reason 3D art can't be equally - or more - compelling than 2D. (Or: the collaborated work can't be better than the concept.) It's all a question of talent, vision and execution. Admittedly Donlan has a point that time, money and technology can all constrain the realisation of a concept, but just because you can find some examples where that's happened doesn't mean that's always the case.

    Sometimes the reverse can even be true - concept art that doesn't come alive until it's sculpted and animated. An example of this would be Dota 2 - the hero and unit models are so vibrant, have so much character, but the concepts that feature on some loading screens are often painfully generic.

    I think you're also over-egging the 'tortured genius of the lone artist' angle here, which I suspect stems from the temptation so many have to look at a great work and immediately attribute it in full to a single artist. The idea that a group of artists working together can produce work that exceeds the abilities of any one member of the team is something that people seem weirdly reluctant to accept.
    Reply +2
  • Rich Stanton on: The Koj delusion

  • thisisatempaccount 16/05/2015

    Also, EG, please put a word filter in place to stop Rich or indeed anyone else ever using 'Koj' again. It sounds like the kind of nickname that would be coined by my mate Gaz, a.k.a. the Bantersaurus Rex, a.k.a. the Archbishop of Banterbury.

    He's a twat.
    Reply +6
  • thisisatempaccount 16/05/2015

    I was braced for another round of sermonising and finger-wagging, but having read the whole thing I think this is one of the most nuanced, well thought-out and fully-rounded discussions on sex in gaming, among other things, that has ever appeared on this site.

    I'm often not sure what to think about Japan. For a country that is (here and elsewhere) patly dismissed as being sexist, they sure seem to have a much more liberal, permissive and generally less repressed attitude toward sexual mores and taboo than we do in the west. And that's *post* 50 Shades of Grey: don't forget that we live in a country that, during our last parliament, banned the production or possession of S&M porn - criminalising an entire sub-culture of consenting adults who were just doing what made them happy.

    Clearly the Japanese don't have it all figured out, but what I think is to be celebrated about their approach is that, yes, while they do produce a lot of sexual content, the whole spectrum of demographics is embraced as potential consumers of it - spanning the spectra of age, gender and sexuality. Hence otome games, shōjo, yaoi/boys love and bishonen: all of which are consumed voraciously and sit alongside the (still more prevalent) content marketed at 18-30 males of the type that would be (exclusively) released here.

    An aside: Look how much Cara Ellison enjoyed Hakuoki: Memories of the Shinsengumi. The first time I read that review, a certain part of my brain wanted to start pointing and yelling about double standards, and hypocrisy, and cross referencing arguments made by social justice advocates who have often criticised the male fantasies typically serviced by romance mechanics in video games.

    Eventually I realised a better response would surely be to celebrate that, when a product exists that caters to a different audience, the appeal of such experiences can be communicated to that audience instantly, at a stroke, crossing the hotly-contested battle lines of politics in a way that shouting and pointing never will. It should never be a case of 'if I don't get to have it, you can't either', but one of 'well, why can't we both have this thing?'

    (I appreciate that in the case of a series like MGS, we're going to be waiting a very long time for the AAA action stealth-em-up starring a female protagonist who can hold X to perve on a dude's almost-exposed package. But in a better universe... at least Bioware are moving us in the right direction on this, whatever reservations you might have about the other qualities of their games.)

    Because it's only one segment of the populace being catered to in the west, we tend to interpret existence of sexual content in our media, especially that which exists specifically to gratify, as A or The Problem. I don't think gratification is the problem. I reckon the real problem has more to do with lack of the diversity for whom these works are aimed - leaving a lot of people outside the tent.
    Reply +9
  • Nintendo's new 3DS Pullblox game is free to download

  • thisisatempaccount 13/05/2015

    Yeah, old fuggers like me will remember this model being called shareware in the nineties. The more things change... Reply +6
  • Christopher Lloyd joins the cast of King's Quest

  • thisisatempaccount 11/05/2015

    I can only pray this is a small step towards a universe in which Lloyd signs on for a Toonstruck 2 Kickstarter. Reply +2
  • The Witcher 3 dev battles leaked footage, spoilers

  • thisisatempaccount 11/05/2015

    So I have a theory. By rushing to shut down all these leaks, they generate news stories, which make people curious and, in a 'screw the man!' kind of way, more likely to go and seek out this footage. I mean, if you wanted people to be exposed to your imminent AAA release, you really couldn't ask for a better free, viral, grass-roots marketing campaign.

    I dunno, does that sound completely paranoid?
    Reply +3
  • The enduring appeal of Nintendo's StreetPass

  • thisisatempaccount 11/05/2015

    If you don't like Pokemon Shuffle, Tom, I recommend getting your hands on Puzzle and Dragons Z. Not only is it a better match 3 (both in its intrinsic mechanics and its RPG meta-layer), but because it's a boxed released it doesn't have a whiff of IAPs. \o/

    On the other hand, it sounds like your problem is that you do like Pokemon Shuffle. For which I think the only solution is to get on the board of a FTSE-100 company or join the City of London.
    Reply +4
  • Huge Dota 2 update adds nod to Terry Pratchett

  • thisisatempaccount 29/04/2015

    @romelpotter The sniper nerf is significant, certainly, but it won't dramatically alter how the character plays. Those sort of nerfs are rare (Tinker in the last patch was fundamentally altered in that his main source of farming was taken away from him). You will still be able to play him and you will still be able to win games.

    Having said that, this game isn't LoL and the whole roster is there for you to pick up whenever you like. Maining isn't really a thing, and the more heroes you play the better you will be when you face up against them. So trying out lots of different heroes is great for all sorts of reasons, even if you have to dial the bots back while you get comfortable.

    Good heroes that are easy to learn the game with: Sven, Death Prophet, Drow Ranger, Lion, Weaver, Luna, Venomancer, Viper, Wraith King, Rikimaru, Shadow Shaman.

    A note about shadow blade: yes, it will save your life a lot of times on a character with no escape. All that it takes to counter it, though, is a 185 gold bag of dust. As such it's best not to rely on it too much as a crutch because for the money there are items which will add greater power to your hero and can't be so easily nullified.
    Reply 0
  • Sofa-nerfing Battlefield Hardline patch out now

  • thisisatempaccount 29/04/2015

    I wonder if this has anything to do with the squeaky teenagers on XBL who keep calling me a pouffe. Reply 0
  • Mortal Kombat X modder makes unplayable characters playable

  • thisisatempaccount 17/04/2015

    I'm sure someone in the games press will be along shortly with an op-ed about why it's a good thing for all of us if (sorry, when) these fighters are released as DLC. Reply 0
  • Mario Kart 8 x Animal Crossing DLC track list and footage

  • thisisatempaccount 15/04/2015

    DUH DUH DUH-DUH DUH DUH DUH DUH DER-NER DER-NER!!

    :D
    Reply +4
  • Square Enix tones down Mobius Final Fantasy's "too sexy" leading man

  • thisisatempaccount 07/04/2015

    I think my eyes were really opened by how many girl gamers loved Ghirahim of Skyward Sword. You see posts all over the miiverse praising his sexy/trashy look and his skimpy lycra outfit. I'm not sure if the character was designed with them in mind - it felt a bit like the character's aesthetic existed at least as much to weird out guys as it did to provide fan service for girls (edit: or gay dudes!). Still, he makes a positive case for sexy in games, in that he broadens the appeal for the series to a (perhaps) non-traditional demographic. I don't care for fan service generally, but I'd rather see it provided for everyone than insisting all sides start covering up. It just seems a more generous way to be fair about things. Reply +8
  • Dragon Quest Heroes review

  • thisisatempaccount 07/04/2015

    Huh. The minion system makes it sound a bit like Shiny's Sacrifice. But if it doesn't feature Tim Curry as a squabbling lightning god it just isn't the same. Reply +1
  • Is Bloodborne the best game ever, or just the second best?

  • thisisatempaccount 24/03/2015

    It all sounds very exciting. I have to admit I'm a bit worried about these reports of long loading times though - in a game about brutal difficulty and frequent game overs, that really isn't an enticing prospect.

    Sounds like a digital version of the game will be a must for all but the most ardent of disc-lovers. It might even be worth replacing the PS4 harddrive with an SDD for this game alone.
    Reply +5
  • Use your remaining Club Nintendo stars on digital 3DS, Wii U games

  • thisisatempaccount 20/03/2015

    @kingbelly That's a good point. One more thing to take into consideration. Reply 0
  • thisisatempaccount 20/03/2015

    Two final points to consider. The value of purchasing power per star, translated into real currency, seems relatively even between straight redemption through the Stars Catalogue and points redemption for purchases on the Wii Shopping Channel. For example, Pullblox World costs £8.99 of real currency, or 5600 stars. The exchange rate for Shopping Channel points is £7 for 1000 when purchasing points via credit card, or .7 pence a point. If you do the sums, 5600 stars worth of converted Shopping Channel points would have a real currency value of £9.80 - slightly higher on comparison.

    Secondly, the Nintendo e-Shop often runs special offers, with steep discounts on many of its popular games, so the average price of any e-Shop download over time is not necessarily stable. That is, you might be able to nab any of these listed games for less money in the future. Whereas the Wii Shopping Channel has, to the best of my knowledge, never had a sale. These two things combined make the Wii Shopping Channel a more attractive proposition for getting the most out of your stars, provided a) you do want something for sale there and b) don't want one of the games being offered in both the Stars Catalogue and on the Wii Shopping Channel (including but not limited to Super Mario World, Super Mario Kart, Pilotwings, Super Metroid, Super Punch-Out!!, Link To The Past, The Legend of Zelda, Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels, Zelda II: The Adventure of Link).
    Reply +1
  • thisisatempaccount 20/03/2015

    @Malek86 If Nintendo were to hate me I would figuratively literally die. :*( Reply +1
  • thisisatempaccount 20/03/2015

    NOTE: If you want to buy MARIO'S SUPER PICROSS there is a CHEAPER way to do it which will cost you LESS stars! See below..

    ( I'm not trying to clickbait you, this is a PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT :D )

    So it's worth remembering that you can still also use your stars to purchase points for the Wii Shopping Channel, accessible from the Wii U menu. The Wii Shopping channel has a lot more stuff to choose from than the games on offer here, and isn't limited to the Virtual Console but offers original and third party games in the form of WiiWare, although running games through the Virtual Console and the Wii U's Wii Mode may result in some visual issues due to double upscaling and other stuff that I'm pulling out of my arse because I don't even slightly have a head for tech stuff.

    NOTE: You will need a NINTENDO CLASSIC CONTROLLER or CLASSIC CONTROLLER PRO to play SNES or N64 games! These are the pads that plug into the bottom of a Wiimote. You CANNOT use a Gamecube controller via WiiU adapter or (I'm pretty certain but do correct me on this if wrong) X-boxy looking Wii U pro controller for these games.

    Everything else on the Wii Shopping Channel can be played with a Wiimote.

    The conversion rate for stars to Wii Shopping points is a flat 4/1; I've done all the conversions for purposes of comparison:

    - A NES game costs 500 points, therefore 2000 stars (2400 for Hanabi festival titles)
    - A SNES game costs 3200 stars (3600 for Hanabi festival titles)
    - An N64 game costs 4000 stars (4800 for Hanabi festival titles)

    So as you can see, if you want to buy Mario's Super Picross it is 900 stars cheaper using this method! Fortunately this isn't true in any other case, Super Punch-Out!! (for example) costs 2100 stars straight from the catalogue as a Wii U download, but 3200 points to obtain through the Wii Shopping Channel, while the Legend of Zelda is 1300 as a Wii U download but 2000 through the Wii Shopping Channel. If you're not taken with any of the games listed in the article, there are a *lot* of other games to choose from, albeit via a slightly fiddly means and at a slight stars premium.

    For anyone interested, here are the prices for the non-Nintendo Virtual Console stuff:
    - Master System games 2000 stars
    - TGFX16 games 2400 stars (2800 for Hanabi)
    - Megadrive games 3200 stars (3600 for Hanabi)
    - NeoGeo games 3600 stars (4000 for Hanabi)

    Finally here's a selection of notable WiiWare titles and their prices in stars:

    - Bit.Trip Beat - 2400 stars
    - Cave Story - 4000 stars
    - La Mulana - 4000 stars
    - Lost Winds / Lost Winds 2 - 4000 stars
    - Retro City Rampage - 4000 stars
    - Sonic 4 Ep. 1 - 6000 stars
    - World of Goo - 6000 stars

    Hope this info proves useful to someone, I've wasted enough time today working it out!
    Reply +10
  • Video: Why Telltale's new IP might be its best game yet

  • thisisatempaccount 27/02/2015

    @TekMerc What an inspired idea. The problem with Star Trek games is that shooty combat (the go-to genre for licensing in games) is only really about 10% of the series - I think they spend less time shooting at things in The Next Generation than they do trapped in the bloody holodeck, and even Jim Kirk was more of a lover than he was a fighter.

    What the series really was, to me at least, is a sort of grand, Ferrero-Rocher themed adventure full of diplomatic tensions, cultural misunderstandings and political dilemmas. The Telltale style isn't a good fit for everything, but I can't think of anything it'd be more perfect for than letting you hang out with Data, Worf and pals while negotiating a peace treaty on a planet full of crinkly-foreheaded telepaths.
    Reply +2
  • Eurogamer has dropped review scores

  • thisisatempaccount 10/02/2015

    I always thought review scores did more harm than good so I applaud both the sentiment and bravery required for EG to make this step. That said I'm not sure how removing a 10 point scale (albeit more a de facto 6 point scale, based on how scores between 1 and 4 were so rarely awarded) and replacing it with what amounts to a 4 point scale is going to be less reductive, exactly.

    The other changes to review policy, well, frankly they should have always been in place, shouldn't they? They're welcome nonetheless.
    Reply 0
  • Resident Evil HD Remaster review

  • thisisatempaccount 20/01/2015

    Perhaps Mr. Parkin would like to share some examples of games that he feels have bettered this one's formative designs? Don't be coy now, Simon. Honestly, I have no horses in this race or anything, but I am genuinely curious to know. Reply +3
  • Club Nintendo to close later this year

  • thisisatempaccount 20/01/2015

    This scheme really came to my rescue when I was at uni. I was flat broke and some bell-end of a best mate stubbed his (cough) cigarette out on my mouse mat, warping the plastic. I couldn't really get on with a piece of paper - the best replacement within the cheeky bugger's means to provide - but a misspent youth's worth of GBA games translated to juuust enough points to secure me an Animal Crossing: Let's Go To The City!® mouse pad, delivered promptly and straight to my hall of residence.

    To this day I've never played a game from the series, but it taught me an important lesson about the value of free promotional tat. Probably the wrong one, but...
    Reply +28
  • Nintendo experimenting with free-to-play, cross-buy for Mario and Pokémon spin-offs

  • thisisatempaccount 14/01/2015

    Ugh. We've seen how this sort of thing has been the thin end of the wedge on pretty much every platform on which it's arrived. Sometimes it feels like Nintendo are one of the few developers who aren't treating their audience with total contempt, so this feels like a bad direction to be moving in. Reply +23
  • Succulent is a popsicle-sucking parody game you have to see

  • thisisatempaccount 14/01/2015

    I have to see it? Am I on buzzfeed? Reply +16
  • How Duke Nukem 3D managed to be ahead of its time while trapped in the past

  • thisisatempaccount 13/01/2015

    @DeLoftie All right, I think we've reached an understanding. You don't see evidence of subversion in those early levels (it's worth noting that the game doesn't actually revisit the red light district over and over, even if that's what it's remembered for), and I do. That's actually totally fine.

    A creator's responsibilities when creating, versus their right to create what they want, well, gosh. That's a whole other can of worms and not something I've frankly taken the effort to hammer out a coherent opinion on. I do sometimes worry about the term 'problematic' being deployed euphemistically by critics in an attempt to circumscribe the sphere of permissible art, but I can hardly fault its use in connection with Duke as he's obviously a divisive figure whose games pose for many people obvious and legitimate problems. And I totally agree that the game deserves critical assessment, I just didn't happen to agree with the job Dan did of it, or at least not all of it, because he seemed to come at the question of the developer's intent with a very straight bat.

    At any rate I'd like to thank you for the discussion, which I enjoyed and feel I got a lot out of.
    Reply +3
  • thisisatempaccount 13/01/2015

    @DeLoftie We seem to be arguing past each other. I just don't accept this idea I'm getting from you that you can only subvert something didactically. Incongruence and absurdity can be hung around an environment for the player to notice, or not; the player can continue blithely to receive gratification that the surface level a grubby game like Duke provides (a handy way to get sales from the immature, I'm by no means arguing that 3D Realms wasn't using this stuff to sell games), while still leaving open (encouraging, even) the possibility that at some point they might have a little think about what they're doing - whether the game has earnestly created that environment as an altar of eroticism to be celebrated, or whether its secretly quite amused by it and its adherents.

    Maybe it's just me, but I think stalking the aisles of porno mag shop, the level following the cinema, the representations of individual titles too grainy to even decipher, much less be titillated by, couldn't fail to give players pause. What am I doing here? Was I really getting turned on by this stuff in the last level? I wan't, right? That would have been.. pathetic.

    I agree totally on your points about the normalisations of strip clubs in other media, I think you made them very well. But let's not forget that Duke doesn't wow the sex workers with his alpha status in this game, he doesn't get 'a free show'; he has to pay his dollar like any other hapless schmoe. The seedy environments Duke inhabits are absolutely constructed from 80s Hollywood pastiche, but I feel like if you look at the details there really is a lot of subversion going on. It just isn't the explicitly communicated, take-a-trope-and-tweak-it-like-a-clown's-nose stuff you seem to demand be the bar for permissible satire.
    Reply +1
  • thisisatempaccount 13/01/2015

    @DeLoftie I dunno mate. I definitely think it's possible to subvert something without needing Duke to wink to the camera while THIS IS SATIRE is flashed up on the screen.

    Does anybody - did anybody ever - really think strippers are cool? Having to pay for sex (or more pathetically, a voyeuristic skin flick, jazz mag or flash of tasselled nipple - Duke never actually gets his bone on in the game) is a socially derided act, the behaviour of the sexually desperate and ineffectual, at complete odds with Duke's portrayal as the all-conquering hero. That juxtaposition is subversive, as is the early levels' depiction of L.A. - that vaunted beacon of American affluence, culture and spiritual home of those supposedly-admired 80s action movies - being that of a grimy, dismal hell-hole barely worth the saving.

    It may not be not very clever, it may not be very nuanced, but it's there.

    I know wikipedia isn't much of a source, but for what it's worth, from the opening paragraphs:

    "Reviewers praised the interactivity of the environment, level design, gameplay, and unique risqué humor, a mix of pop-culture satire and lampooning of over-the-top Hollywood action heroes."
    Reply +4
  • This third-party Wii U GameCube controller adapter works with PC, too

  • thisisatempaccount 13/01/2015

    My theory is that everyone's hand sizes are different, but pad sizes are constant, so the comfort/discomfort in using a given pad deriving from this probably has a vast amount more to do with how 'well-designed' it is for a given person than things like ergonomics and symmetry.

    Personally I found the N64 and gamecube controllers to be absolute brillo, but couldn't get on with either xbox or 360 controller (too big). I also quite like the various species of dualshock so it's with some trepidation that I must conclude I have smaller than average hands.
    Reply +4