redcrayon Comments

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  • Video: Metal Gear Solid 5 and Mega Man Legacy Collection - The Eurogamer Show

  • redcrayon 29/08/2015

    @greg_wha
    Understandable, the Megaman games are pretty cool. :-)
    Reply +2
  • Angry Birds developer Rovio to lay off 260 staff

  • redcrayon 26/08/2015

    A good portion of their staff work in promotion and merchandising, which requires Angry Birds to be capable of selling lunchboxes, toys and t-shirts long-term. I'm not really sure how they thought that might work out. Their target market is all buying Minions and Frozen kit now (with toy and clothes shops having made room for it by binning less popular brands), and has been for at least the last 18 months.

    I hope those affected are able to find new jobs, but a huge portion of them aren't games developers, their skills are transferable to other industries a bit more easily.
    Reply +35
  • What's the deal with Metal Gear Solid 5 microtransactions?

  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @PlugMonkey
    Fair points
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @GreyBeard
    I think that analogy is cool for single player.

    In multiplayer it's more like me turning up to play footy, and finding the other team is starting 1-0 up because one of the players slipped the ref a tenner.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @PlugMonkey
    And you're welcome to think that. And they're welcome to think it's better to have the gear from the start (even if they're wrong). And if the publisher had offered them a $5 microtransaction to save them the bother of hacking the game, I don't really see how that spoils your experience any more than them spending time to work out how to hack it did.
    Because when you are learning to play a game with a twenty-minute or so battle, having two guys come in with gear that kills the enemy in seconds gives you no time to learn the tells of how to hunt it other than their overpowering brute force, and gives no incentive to work together and learn tactics in a multiplayer, class-based game. That's how. If they hadn't hacked it, characters of their level would have no way of having access to such equipment, usually it's evident from someone's rank what they might have access to. The idea that overpowered players don't affect the game of regular players seems a bit odd.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @PlugMonkey


    You're saying remove the grind altogether? Go back to simple 2D games? I'm all for that, but some people like the grind
    Not at all, I'm saying make it engaging gameplay for every single minute first, not an economy first.

    That's no more true than when the last guy said it. It's no more true than saying that all games exist solely to extract cash from people. Some do, some don't, regardless of payment model.
    Are you saying that microtransactions as a gameplay element don't exist solely to extract cash from people? What I'm saying is that once a player has paid fifty quid, an extra minigame based around fun gameplay is better than an extra minigame built from the ground up around microtransactions. It might also be fun, but it was entirely built around extracting even more cash, rather than just offering something extra. You seem to be trying to muddy the waters by applying it to all games. I didn't say that, I said the only reason for this mode to exist is as a cashgrab, not that games themselves don't exist to make money.

    I doubt I have any more time to play games than you do (mid-thirties, young family, job etc) but it certainly hasn't endeared me to the idea that I can pay even more to make up for the time that I haven't spent playing the game. That just seems utterly alien to me, there's no time limit that a game has to be played by. The idea that I could pay to avoid the grind kinda demands the question 'but if that grind was fun and engaging, why would I want to skip it?".

    I play Monster Hunter every now and then, and was surprised to find a handful of players had hacked it to get access to the best armour very early. Seeing as I was enjoying hunting monsters, rather than having a goal of getting the best gear as quickly as possible, it just seemed to miss the point of playing the game if you don't actually enjoy the grind.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @Eurogamer
    Can you have a proper look at how all this works in the review seeing as Konami doesn't think customers should have more than a few hours notice before buying it.

    @Plugmonkey
    I don't mind microtransactions in a free game, but in a 50 one it's taking the piss. Rather than some people paying to skip a tedious grind, how about just having a mode where it isn't a tedious grind but actually enjoyable gameplay? I put hundreds of hours into simple 2D games in my youth, playing the same thing over and over again, not because I would be rewarded with in-game currency or items, but because the gameplay was actually fun. Adding microtransactions means that the only reason for the mode to exist is as an economy of time vs money to grab more cash from players, rather than a distinctly more laudable goal of offering more engaging gameplay for everyone who has already paid 50 or more.
    Reply +3
  • Sony dates Tokyo Games Show PlayStation press conference

  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    @IamWeasel
    Are you suggesting that the entire Paris Games Show and TGS were scheduled in cahoots with Sony to happen specifically on those weeks so that Sony could choose to attend and run a press conference? That sounds a little unlikely. They can only run a TGS show on the week that TGS happens.
    Reply 0
  • PlayStation Plus' free September offerings revealed

  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    The PS Blog comments under this story seem a little more upset than the EG ones. Reply +2
  • redcrayon 25/08/2015

    I know some people won't like it, but personally Super Time Force and Xeodrifter is a great line up for me as a Vita-only PS+ subscriber. I was going to buy them both anyway. Reply +3
  • Star Fox Zero, Xenoblade Chronicles X, Mario Tennis release dates

  • redcrayon 24/08/2015

    Why does it matter which specific Friday Starfox, Tennis and Battlefront come out on? Q4 is always packed full of games, there's several dozen titles releasing across all formats. I doubt an online multiplayer shooter is any more likely to impact Starfox's (probably fairly small) sales than if it had picked the weekend with CoD, Halo, Assassins Creed or Fallout instead. Plenty of gamers are going to choose one of those (or any of the others) over Starfox whether they release six weeks in front of it or six hours. Reply +4
  • Why I will never call video games a hobby

  • redcrayon 15/08/2015

    @shehzaanshazabdulla
    I don't play tabletop games but I don't think many people find enjoyment in how they intepret them and then convey their interpretations (that is, expressing a part of themselves which the action has become).
    Fair enough on the rest of your post, I agree with most of that, but I disagree on this specific point- painting and converting hundreds of miniatures, to create colour schemes and provide a physical form for heroes you've invented yourself, is directly conveying your interpretation of them. I don't sculpt the models of the regiments of medieval infantry I use, but I do pose and paint and name the captains and units, inventing heraldry, adding base details, scars, weapons and smoke to give the impression of a battlefield as I imagine it. I really don't see how computer games are a form of gaming that can't be a hobby, when plenty of tabletop gamers devote years to researching and building armies and battlefields only to never even use them as the creative and historical or fantastical side of it rather than the gaming one is what matters to them.

    Like I said in my initial post, lots of hobbys have people that devote their lives and careers to them, a pastime can be both a hobby and a life's passion to two different people. I know that when I was younger my hobbies certainly seemed more important to me than now, when really they have turned into my social life once a week instead!

    Computer games, tabletop games, films and books, and even physical activities like running or sport or martial arts, can have a huge, deeper and more meaningful impact on some people's life than others, but I still don't think that 'hobby' is a bad description when that's what any of the above are to millions of people for whom it's just entertainment and exercise rather than life-affirming social commentary, a lifelong passion where creating or mastering it's mechanics is key, or a career.

    To quote Keith, sure, neither Hitchcock nor Antonioni saw films as a hobby. But the vast majority of people who viewed their works sure did, and outnumbered the film buffs and critics by a thousand to one.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 15/08/2015

    @shehzaanshazabdulla
    I don't think a hobby means an easily compartmentalised part of a life at all. I play wargames, it means a garage full of unpainted kits, paints and brushes, a shed full of paraphernalia, a loft full of boxes of painted models, a weekly evening out playing games with my friends followed by dinner in the pub. I have a young family, and while computer games are something I play on the train, tabletop games are the 'hobby' it would be far harder to remove from my life, as it's what I have in common with most of my friends and also provides a hefty chunk of my social life and my dad's support group! It's still a hobby, just because it is intertwined with my life and has provided decades of fun doesn't mean I need to call it a vital expressive medium, even though the artistic and modelling side of it is certainly that!

    What I would say is that, for people who work in any of these games industries professionally, it must be incredibly annoying if people suggest their career isn't a serious one. It looks like bloody hard work.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 15/08/2015

    Computer games are a hobby for an awful lot of people, the problem is with the author's assumption that the word 'hobby' is somehow demeaning to an medium that can mean an expressive medium, sport or employment to thousands yet nothing more than a regular few hours of entertainment to millions.

    Board games, roleplaying games and wargames have no such issue with being called a hobby, and have all manner of titles covering similar issues such as terrorism, zombies, the surveillance state, assymetrical warfare, the breakdown of society etc. The difference is that computer games provides a living for vastly more people (including the writer).

    For any of these they can be about expression and have something to say, but not all of them (or even the majority of them), and not all of the time. What they all are, all of the time, is games.
    Reply +5
  • Nintendo employee fired after podcast remarks on localisation, fans

  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @OliverH
    And as I understand it, he did not suggest he was speaking as a representative of Nintendo, but merely as a guy who works there.
    I suppose it depends on how people read his use of 'we did this' etc when talking about NoAs localisation. Fair enough, perhaps he only meant his department rather than NoA as a whole, but even so I think he didn't make it very clear, and without knowing the media policies in his contract it's hard to know exactly what line he crossed.

    the damage he did to the company was negligible, whereas there's a serious risk of fallout for his dismissal, given how it reinforces stereotypes about Nintendo's business practices.
    I don't think so, one junior employee getting fired doesn't carry much weight, it'll be forgotten pretty quickly. I certainly don't think there's a serious risk of firing him doing them long-term harm.

    The only real long term effect of this is unfortunately the poor sod's name being added to the growing list of people fired because of the confusion between personal and professional opinions on social media.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @PlugMonkey
    In an ideal world, it would be nice if stuff like this was seen by companies as relatively harmless, part of social media and taken on a case-by-case basis, particularly when the only people discussing it are the same 'small' group of people he spoke about in the podcast. But it's a bit pointless when businesses the world over with huge media, legal and PR departments aren't about to change their company policy and contracts to let junior staff pass themselves off as speaking in an official capacity for the business whenever they like.

    If you are going to publicly answer questions about your employer on your own time, I'd make damn sure to get something in writing from my boss first, and quickly check with PR to see if theres anything I really, really should stay away from. Insulting customers would kind of go without saying for me. Just rocking up to talk candidly about what 'we' thought of our customers strikes me as something I wouldn't even dream of doing, but then he isn't the first guy to lose his job because he though the reach of social media was smaller than it was.

    I don't think it's as simple as 'this is right' and 'this is wrong', I'm not sure stopping companies from enforcing the grounds for dismissal listed in a contract would be particularly fair either, no matter whether it's a global publisher or a small business. Instant dismissal is harsh, but then a blatant disregard for your employer's media policies when you want to appear on podcasts etc without telling them is not that smart.

    It seems like he really did love his job, and I do feel sorry for him for losing it over something so pointless as raking over the fallout of localisation requests on a podcast.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @TheRealBadabing
    The photo isn't from the podcast, it's from his work in his official capacity at E3.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @MattEvansC3
    His delivery was wrong but no reasonable person would treat this as being representative of Nintendo as an organisation. By firing him Nintendo are stating they control his personal opinion and his time outside of work.
    To be fair, he answered quite a few of the questions using 'we' to refer to Nintendo. If you talk about your company in that tense in a public forum, even if you do it on your day off, then listeners might well think that you are officially representing them, and your boss might wonder why you didn't just say 'I think' instead.

    Imagine if you, as a public servant, went on a radio show on your day off to talk about transport, and answered questions as 'we did this' and 'we did that'. I'm sure your boss might wonder why you didn't qualify it a bit if you didn't mean to come across as a spokesperson.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @Plugmonkey
    I think it's more that if your company considers it gross misconduct for you to do something, and you do it, that is a bit foolish if you like your job.

    Sure, only having official corporate spokespeople is boring, but there's a difference between it being a great idea for him to do it because we want to know what's going on (I found it interesting personally), and it being a great idea when considering the potential consequences to his career for agreeing to an interview where he would be portrayed as an official rep without clearing it with his boss first.

    I mean, most big publishers have PR staff wandering around with their senior staff to stop them putting their foot in their mouth too often, I can't imagine they are more flexible with junior staff that haven't told anyone what they are doing. Maybe if he'd have cleared it first, he would have had more of a leg to stand on.
    Reply +6
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @mazzaman89

    ? Because my company directors and HR department, not to mention my boss and our PR department, would view it as gross misconduct for me to be offering my opinion as the company representative at length without talking to them first? Particularly if I started talking about what we thought of our customers, and something relevant to our major release that Christmas and it was then widely discussed on the internet as our company being boneheaded? Pretty sure that's in my contract. It's why I don't talk about my work on Facebook, let alone to industry press shows.

    If you are a relatively junior employee, and you suddenly feel the need to spill the beans about things your company messed up and what you think of senior staff on social media, I'd think again. If they had done something illegal and he was whistleblowing I'd be totally in agreement that what he did was right, but if it's just pretending to be the company line on social media, then I don't think it was very clever.

    I sympathise with him having lost his dream job, you'd think a written warning would have been enough, but he brought it on himself.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    @mazzaman89
    So he lost his job for highlighting the reason Nintendo makes the decisions it does? The reasons which any reasonable human being can understand?
    That's a huge simplification. If I decided to randomly appear on one of my industries trade sites to talk about my companies failures, our customers lack of understanding and our senior staff at length, I'd expect to be in serious trouble afterwards too.

    If Nintendo risked money on every single obscure title that comes their way, they would have been out of business years ago.
    Well, they greenlighted the cost to develop Xenoblade X and Xenoblade 3DS in Japan, put a Xenoblade character in Smash, and are releasing the sequel worldwide to what I expect will be little fanfare. It's slightly different to expect huge first-party titles to be supported than obscure ones, even if one of their branches had to swallow the localisation cost. Even so, it was vastly more pricy to translate it for the EU than to just do it in English for the US, so perhaps the more interesting question is why did NoE see the potential in building it as a franchise when NoA didn't?
    Reply +7
  • redcrayon 14/08/2015

    So he didn't clear the interview with his boss, and went on to talk about how the predecessor to one of their biggest releases in their biggest market in the biggest season for Nintendo's strugglling home console this year doesn't have enough fans. While giving them silly voices. Any other company would be happy to know they have customers that want their products even if it isn't cost-effective to supply them, there's no need to talk as if the company line is that their fans are unreasonable for seeing a game being released that looks cool and asking for it. I think if I went onto a webshow to talk about my company like that, I wouldn't expect to still have a job either. Social media doesn't mean people don't mistake your opinion for the company line.

    Sure Xenoblade/Xenoblade X are a guaranteed loss, but there is wider value in having a range of games on a console other than all surefire hits in a handful of the most popular genres for that machine. Critical acclaim also isn't utterly valueless in terms of building reputation for the next machine down the line, and seeing as that's probably the only positive Nintendo are taking from the WiiU, I can't imagine them looking on his opinions favourably.

    Instant dismissal does seem a little harsh compared to most HR procedures, but it's probably more that a forum picked up on it and ran with it rather than what he said. Still, considering the grassroots demand for Xenoblade was pretty strong in forums, the fact that he didn't see that as a potential consequence was also a bit naive.
    Reply +4
  • Video: Where's the hype for these huge games?

  • redcrayon 13/08/2015

    If all you are doing is recycling press footage without adding editorial content, why be surprised if readers aren't using EG as a portal for footage of them? These games are everywhere on the internet (well, maybe not on Mumsnet). As a broader point, their promos are also very predictably similar- oh look, large amounts of people being brutally slaughtered in an urban environment by a PC in god-mode. Quelle surprise (or was that AC last year?). I don't need to see what's in them, I can probably guess.

    While I realise that the video's point is that these games aren't being looked at on EG as much as expected even amongst similar videos, maybe it's not such a bad thing that your readers don't just mindlessly follow whatever the biggest publisher tells us is going to be huge this 'holiday'. I much prefer looking at your videos with fresh editorial content like the one on The Swindle just before it's release or the breakdown of the Fallout reveal footage, there's a lot that can be done to make computer games look engaging rather than wonder why an aging, media-savvy audience isn't as partial to animated advertising as it used to be. I mean, years ago in print the previews were bad enough with a writer frothing about an upcoming title, but at least it was content, but with a video we often get fifty words introducing it and then it's an extended advert. The equivalent would be one of your video team breaking down the advert and offering some kind of insight on it, not just penning three sentences introducing it.

    I quite like the EG show, I can only see that here and it's been interesting seeing you all try different things with it, but if I want to watch samey press-released footage I can do that anywhere. I'm looking forward to seeing where you go with the video stuff though :-)
    Reply +5
  • Phil Spencer on Xbox's big year

  • redcrayon 13/08/2015

    @Esppiral
    How can a direct secuel of the greatest game of all times be awfull?.
    Plenty of sequels to great games ended up as poor iterations, let alone one made fifteen years later when the audience and director are older and hardware evolution, industry and the competition for open-world games are much more developed. Don't get me wrong, it might be great, but it might not capture the magic again due to it not being the exact same audience, conditions and development environment etc. We just don't know, but to assume something will be wonderful just because a predecessor was strikes me as a bit optimistic.

    Same goes for FFVII- it could be great, the characters are popular, and it could fix the problems of the original like the garbled mess of a translation. But it's going to be a whole new set of gameplay mechanics, a new battle system, and an overworld a little more developed than a few pixels on a world map. It's closer to a whole new game with all the possibilities for awesome new ideas, beautiful visuals and global success, or confused, bloated failure, than it is to automatically laying claim to the success of the original when many gamers had yet to discover FF nearly twenty years ago.

    What I do find interesting is the level of faith people have in specific series and developers/directors even after years of waiting, personally the last FF I really enjoyed was XII in 2006 but I still follow the series with interest. Let's hope they both meet people's expectations, but I think that's a tough ask after all this time.

    But then Shenmue3 happened and it is not comming to Xbox, because Phil is just retarded.
    Now that's just silly.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 13/08/2015

    I've never owned an Xbox but I like Phil Spencer compared to some of the previous industry leaders. He's clearly very capable, has worked hard to get great games moving on the Xbox One, but is respectful and enthusiastic about the industry as a whole rather than needlessly aggressive. Reply +13
  • We're all Palmer Luckey on the cover of Time magazine

  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    Just looking at the shot inside (you can see it here ) of him looking at the camera
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/insertcoin/2015/08/06/debate-rages-over-whether-or-not-times-oculus-cover-has-killed-vr/

    Is the idea that it's drawing a parallel with him lifting a scuba facemask off his head, so on the cover he's supposed to be swimming?
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    @SeeNoWeevil
    Damn right.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    @Ghibli
    In the early days of my career I would have dreamed on working on Total Carp :D Let's just say that a chunk of my inglorious time in editorial's deepest trenches was spent on titles most likely to only be heard of when appearing on that part of Have I Got News for You when everyone laughs at the trade press headlines! On my current rag it's a Friday afternoon tradition to laugh about which of us have worked on the most obscure title. Freelance subs usually win :-)

    I see that Forbes have put up an article wondering how much damage it has done to VR, and Time are on damage control by asking people to send them the funniest photoshops of their cover. I can see it now in conference: 'But our summer issue was the most retweeted cover ever, we're finally getting the digital age!"
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    @Ghibli
    Sure, it's possible, it's up for debate really, maybe you and Spacemonkey are right and I'm not cynical enough :-) I've been a magazine art editor for fifteen years, and agree entirely that Time is a top gig. Sometimes even the best editorial staff drop the ball though, I saw that Luckey was saying on Twitter that the journo missed some key points too. Part of me wonders if it's just as likely it was as simple as them thinking 'summer issue about the future of VR, we'll sell loads of copies at airports, people might take it on holiday, let's get a nice beach on there!" :D

    I just think that the ed/AD having a bit of a brainfart about a cover regarding a subject they don't understand is a more likely explanation that trying to hatchet-job someone with the artwork while praising them in type. I must have worked on several hundred magazine covers in my time and there are a few half-baked ideas of mine (or the editor's phoned in at a moment's notice), particularly on weeklies I'd rather not have in my portfolio too :-)

    Usually the covers on the weeklies are forgotten really quickly but this is so bad that it's going to run for a while. I don't think it's really going to do Time any favours either.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    @masseffectman
    The typography is awful too.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 07/08/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77
    I think it's more likely to be the mundane reason of the art director having a shit idea for the cover, the editor OK'ing it (or one or the other being on holiday) and they called it a day rather than a conspiracy theory to deliberately make VR look stupid because the internet is killing print publishing. They wouldn't be running a positive lead article and a strapline saying that it's about to change the world if that was the case.
    Reply +3
  • Gearbox's team-based shooter Battleborn out February 2016

  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    @grassyknoll
    Ah, fair enough, I thought it was something like that, and presumably the manufacturing/shipping cost of the cards is miniscule.

    I quite like browsing in games shops, I didn't realise they made so little on consoles, shame as that's the thing I prefer to buy from them, so I have somewhere physical to take it back to when it inevitably breaks down! I'm kinda 50/50 physical/digital at the moment, mainly due to the prices for new games on PSN/eshop etc is so high.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    I was thinking about this this morning- the only thing I've bought in Game for a long time is PSN/eshop cards, which are 20 for 20 credit. That also puts their loyalty points on my store card, enough so that my last one was effectively free. Are Game effectively paying me to take them away? Presumably they buy them at a small discount, but still! Reply 0
  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    @grassyknoll
    Fair point, the fact that you usually get more trade-in credit than cash does help to keep the money coming back.

    I think it's easy for a developer to look at someone buying a second hand copy of their game and complain, and not realise that a second customer buying a new copy might well have traded in their rival's game to do so.

    People seem to keep Nintendo games. I think it's because most of the big ones are a once-per-console thing rather than a new iteration every 1-2 years, as well as being pretty good. The first CoD or AC game on a console doesn't have much resell value when the fourth is released, but Mario Kart will still be 30+.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    @a-double-vodka
    I agree entirely, as I said, I think there's a world of difference between a seller privately offloading a single copy of a game they spent money on and don't want to keep, and a retain chain with hundreds of stores having a company policy of promoting second-hand goods that are only a couple of weeks old in place of a new copy at the till. The latter is a fundamentally broken relationship between retail and publisher, the former something that seems fair enough to me if someone doesn't enjoy a 50 product enough to keep it for more than a couple of weeks. When I was a kid and bought a dud NES game (or toy or book for that matter), I wish it had been as easy to exchange it/sell it as it is now.

    If developers want someone to keep their game and not sell it on, making good games that people actually want to keep is a good start for them, and dealing with an unhealthy relationship with games retailers that thought the future of their business was in promoting second-hand sales over new is a good start for their publisher.

    The rapid increase of digital sales this gen has high-street retail desperate for lifelines like exclusive DLC, toys-to-life and PSN/eshop cards, all of which seem to be longer-term solutions than fostering a toxic relationship with the businesses that make the stuff they sell.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    @Simatron3000
    I don't think it's as black and white as that. Sure, some sales are lost, but not every second-hand sale would translate into an actual one. I buy games all the time on eBay that I wouldn't seek out and buy from a store, it's just that I'm browsing there with a paypal balance and sometimes spot them at a price I'm happy to pay, whereas I absolutely wouldn't seek out and pay the ludicrous 60 on the digital stores. They haven't lost a sale as they had no chance of getting my money at that price even if the second-hand copy wasn't available. It's not helped by an industry that puts no value on keeping it's back catalogue available, and the odds of you finding something more than a couple of years old on the high street is pretty slim.

    The idea that every pre-owned sale is a lost brand new, full-price sale just isn't true. It's kinda being countered by those (just as bad in my eyes) retailer-specific download/pre-order packs where you have no idea if any of the codes have been used in a pre-owned copy these days anyway, but that was because retailer's promoting second-hand copies over new ones en-mass was a far bigger problem than individual gamers flogging individual games they were done with on eBay. That's small fry compared to when Game was doing it as a matter of policy here and Gamespot doing the same in the US.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 06/08/2015

    Probably the most generic game name for a while. What else was on the shortlist, 'warblood' and 'killmaim'? It's like they are taking 90s Image comics as an inspiration. Reply +1
  • New article on Konami paints a bleak picture

  • redcrayon 03/08/2015

    @airjoca
    Wasn't just the SNES, on the PSOne you still had Castlevania and Suikoden amongst others.
    Reply +1
  • The Swindle review

  • redcrayon 28/07/2015

    It's out now on EU PSN if anyone's wondering, 10.19 for plus subscribers, 12 if not. Reply 0
  • redcrayon 27/07/2015

    @asal_bach
    It's out tomorrow.
    Reply 0
  • Video: The Swindle, fan remakes and Choice Chamber

  • redcrayon 25/07/2015

    @Zyrr
    Vita version comes out same day as the PC edition, on Tuesday. Looks great, should see me through a summer of commuting!
    Reply +1
  • How's Xbox doing?

  • redcrayon 22/07/2015

    @SlartyBartFarst
    'Some folk' would claim that EG are biased towards global annihilation if they thought they could score points for their favourite multinational corporation's new toy by doing so. Who they are accused of bias towards seems to change depending on the week and given day.
    Reply +4
  • Watch 26 minutes of Monster Hunter X gameplay

  • redcrayon 21/07/2015

    @Atthasit
    MH4 (and 3G) has a lock-on option for the camera that I found fine for my highly enjoyable 250 hours+ with it on an old 3DS XL, with no circle pad or anything else. I put in 230 hours on Tri on the Wii with a classic controller beforehand, and really didn't find the lock-on to be any worse at all. Sure, there is an option to have camera controls are on the touch screen if you don't have a New 3DS or a circle pad. But that's all they are, an option, I never even used them once, the super-easy lock-on option made them utterly redundant as all you ever do in MH is point it straight at what you are hunting anyway. If anything, I found the options for adding shortcuts for items and shoutouts etc on the touch screen to be a far more useful addition instead.

    If you are using the touch screen camera rather than lock-on (if you don't have a second stick option) you are probably doing it wrong, I don't know why anyone would choose digital buttons for something so important rather than have it automated to constantly look at the target. You can easily have it switch between multiple large targets as well, it's what it's designed for. Otherwise it's like complaining that the Vita rear touch buttons aren't as good as a missing l2 and R2. Of course they aren't, that's why there's a better option for MH3G/4's camera instead.

    Personally, the worst platform for MH for me is the one I can't drag onto a train (being a dad without 200 spare hours at home any more), so opinions and all that.
    Reply +1
  • Nintendo president Satoru Iwata passes away at 55

  • redcrayon 13/07/2015

    @Bickle2
    There are going to be years and dozens of threads to examine Iwata's legacy, and I don't think anyone would care if you do so in the most robust terms a bit later on, but if you don't understand why most people leave it out on the day someone dies out of common decency, I don't know what to say.
    Reply +6
  • Inside Shanghai's hardcore gaming heartbeat

  • redcrayon 13/07/2015

    Great article, more like this please! Reply +5
  • Crypt of the NecroDancer to get jiggy on PS4 and Vita

  • redcrayon 11/07/2015

    Not sure my dad-dancing will get me off the first floor without the monsters standing aghast (like most observers when I bust out my cobweb-encrusted moves) but I'll give it a go on the Vita! Reply +2
  • Jon Blyth on: Fixing Her Story

  • redcrayon 04/07/2015

    @leeroye
    I don't think they've covered Her Story to quite the same extent as Destiny.
    Reply +3
  • Keiji Inafune: video gaming's harshest critic

  • redcrayon 03/07/2015

    @perydwyn
    There are good and bad examples of games being embraced by the market at all development budgets, it's not like all AAA games are blazing successes either. The difference is that when an AAA game is rejected by the market, it often ends up with the studio closing and dozens of redundancies, hence risk-averse, throw-in-everything-bar-the-kitchen-sink design and fewer studios making those games.

    The idea that the market only wants massive AAA games isn't borne out by the vastly fewer amount of those games being made and the fewer amount of studios that can afford to make them. It's more of a fractured market now where anything goes, and indie devs can put out their latest bonkers games but it doesn't mean people will buy it. Meanwhile, devs making AAA stuff are terrified of making stuff that isn't a open world, collect-em-up, online multiplayer stabber/shooter because that's where the money is. That isn't any more healthy than an industry where we only see quirky oddball stuff.
    Reply 0
  • Project X Zone 2 UK release date kicked into 2016

  • redcrayon 02/07/2015

    First one was awful. On a system with Ghost Recon: Shadow Wars, Fire Emblem and Devil Survivor, a turn-based strategy game has to have more than a mountain of in-jokes to stand out. Reply +1
  • Video: Games with awful product tie-ins

  • redcrayon 02/07/2015

    I never knew what was worse in the early 90s, the product tie-ins like Cool Spot (7-Up) or the licensed bullshittery of the Mcdonalds games (MC kids/Global Gladiators etc) that were basically getting kids to pay 40 to watch an extended advert for burgers. Reply +2