redcrayon Comments

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  • The best Vita games

  • redcrayon 25/05/2015

    @loadstone007
    What's so good about Batman: Blackgate? I thought about picking it up but reviews weren't that great.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 24/05/2015

    Ys: Memories of Celceta is easily my favourite game on the system, I'm not sure why so many multiplat indies are listed when everyone already knows they are great. Killzone Mercenary should be on there too, and Toukiden.

    The game I'm playing at the moment is Damascus Gear, a great little loot-based mech game. It's not huge, but for 7.99 it's great fun as the core gameplay of mech combat, picking up dozens of parts and customising loadouts is grand. Not the best game ever or anything, but it's quirky little titles like that that make me keep a portable in my bag.
    Reply +10
  • League of Legends automated reform system targets toxic players

  • redcrayon 21/05/2015

    @Faramis
    Most bans seem like they will be temporary. Surely 'normal' players are able to play a game without sending out abusive messages every couple of weeks? I don't think I've ever felt the inclination to do so. If they only act like a dick every so often, they'll only get banned for a fortnight every so often.
    Reply +4
  • Nintendo's new 3DS Pullblox game is free to download

  • redcrayon 13/05/2015

    Seems pretty reasonable, the pullbox games are great. Reply +5
  • Dragon Quest 8 coming to Nintendo 3DS

  • redcrayon 13/05/2015

    Seeing as we didn't get DQVII, I think the chance of an EU release is pretty slim. Reply +2
  • Nintendo "optimistic" on ending region locks, starting with NX

  • redcrayon 11/05/2015

    @Pirederas
    To be fair, some of their previous consoles and all of their previous portables like the GBA and DS were region free, it's not like they have always blocked it up to now, they seem to have done it on a system-by-ststem basis. I was mystified when the 3DS was region-locked, I must have spent hundreds of pounds on importing DS software through VG+.CA.

    For me the main reason to import was Atlus's games which never got a release here on DS, so it's frustrating on 3DS that sometimes we get releases eighteen months after the US, and occasionally digital-only, when I could have easily imported instead.

    Instead, by the time EO Untold and SMtIV released here on 3DS to little fanfare over a year after the US releases, I had lost all interest in them and so had the press.

    Maybe Nintendo have realised that their previous portables being rife with piracy wasn't due to region locking, it was down to the OS being easily cracked. Now that the eshop and various games can require a system update to function, that's far more of a safety net than blocking some worldwide sales of their, er, worldwide games business when not every publisher has a competent EU office.
    Reply +9
  • The enduring appeal of Nintendo's StreetPass

  • redcrayon 11/05/2015

    The streetpass hotspots were a great addition to this, I regularly pick up Monster Hunter 4 streetpasses just by walking past a Starbucks on my way to work.

    I can also attest to the Zelda concerts being insane for streetpasses- I went to one when they played at the Hammersmith Apollo about 3 and a half years ago, and ended up with over two hundred of them just while I was waiting outside. The only annoying thing was the limit of only holding ten at a time.

    I have to admit tht I don't think I've looked at the mini games or puzzles in years. They were good fun when there was a bit of a games drought in the first year though, and for demonstrating that it was worth checking out streetpass features on the games I bought. I particularly liked the duels in LBW.
    Reply +1
  • Nintendo to launch five smartphone games by March 2017

  • redcrayon 08/05/2015

    I think they are right to be cautious, and to put some thought and investment into a few well-supported games designed for mobile play rather than just spamming their back catalogue with touch controls as is often suggested. There's a huge opportunity for a new revenue stream there, but doing it on the cheap might poison the well, as well as directly competing with it's own already embattled portable line. Reply +2
  • Nintendo records first annual profit in four years

  • redcrayon 07/05/2015

    What is coming up for 3DS in the next year to justify that forecast?

    I know we get Codename Steam next month (already released elsewhere) and Fire Emblem next year, but I can't see a couple of strategy games pushing sales that much, even if FE If matches Awakening.

    I wonder if they'll show another New 3DS exclusive port or something at E3 to push sales of the new model, or at least something sizable for the holidays.
    Reply +1
  • The ace hunter: Bloodborne vs Monster Hunter 4: Ultimate

  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    @SeesThroughAll
    I don't think that's entirely true about commitment to attacking. You also have to take into account that not only does attacking in MH lock you into attack animations for virtually all weapons, but they all require you to sheathe weapons to use items, and also just having your weapon unsheathed severely limits your dodging ability for most of the weapons. As a lancer, with my weapon sheathed I can't block but I can run and dive. With my weapon unsheathed, I can't use items or run or make any evasive manouvers apart from a tiny hop sideways or backwards.

    Those commitments to attack or defense in having your weapon ready or not, on top of being unable to cancel out of most attack animations, are as much a fundamental part of MH as they are to BB, it runs through the entire game, not just some of the weapons. Hunters sheathe and unsheathe every few seconds when fighting some monsters as they are so quick that lancers and greatswords struggle to close with the enemy.

    I do agree that its a poor pair of games to compare outside of them both being action games with nice, deep mechanics to explore though.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    @BellyFullOfHell
    Monster Hunter's difficulty is more on the side of learning it's systems initially- it takes a while to get your head around the rhythm of hunting and crafting. What I always recommend to people is to stick with it until you kill your first big monster. The tutorials are long but they do teach you the stuff you'll need to succeed long-term, like making potions and using traps etc. unfortunately, they aren't the most exciting part of the game, which is when you have a deadly creature ten times your size scared, wounded and running for it's life as you turn the tables, pursue it to it's lair and close in for the kill. If that doesn't grab you first time around, nothing will :D

    In general play, I find Monster Hunter more forgiving at higher levels due to having far more options for powerful consumables, and for tailoring armour and weapons vs specific monsters, but they are ones you have to make yourself. Monster Hunter rewards preparation like few other games, but turn up in the wrong gear and you'll likely get slaughtered.

    It's really hard to compare difficulty directly- in MH experience against one monster usually helps against ones of similar types and subspecies, so hours of play vs one species can make you good at that but leave you lacking vs another. One monster's final form almost always wrecks me, even in G-rank gear. On the other hand, often hunters are getting better and more rounded without even knowing it, realising they don't have enough time to chug a potion during a specific attack animation, always packing a farcaster (teleport back to camp item), packing an item that can heal allies, that kind of thing. It's really hard to describe. The best hunters are not only good all-rounders but have amassed specific knowledge and tactics vs specific enemies, and that applies to Souls too.

    Both games can leave you feeling scarily competent one minute and fleeing for your life a few moments later if you let your guard down, I think that's where this comparison comes from, they appeal to a similar mindset of wanting a challenge that can only be beaten by experience and preparation, not by stats alone.
    Reply +6
  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    @BellyFullOfHell
    Short answer is that yes they are good, and there's 80-odd hours of SP fun in them, but Tri (Wii) no longer exists online, and Tri U (WiiU) is fairly dead online these days. The good thing is that TriU (and 4G for that matter) allow you to tackle all the online content offline, albeit alone. If you want to try the series, 3U is your best bet, it looks beautiful (to me) and you can also play it on the gamepad in bed :D
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    One thing I do think both are good at is creature design. Bloodborne's fantasy stuff is beautiful and creative, and the MH team are great at making the monsters feel 'real' through observations of real-world creatures.

    For example, the way the snake wyverns coil and strike, or the way that a Gore Magala tenses then leaps sideways, reminiscent of a cat playing with it's prey. It reminds me of the monsters from Dragon's Dogma too, I remember thinking the Chimera and Hydra were really well-observed with lion/snake movement then too.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    I've spent 250 hours in MH4 and only really used 3 of the weapons so far, but as the article says, I've got the parts to make dozens of decent pieces of kit to experiment with. Which I'm starting to toy with, having beaten the online boss about 60 hours of play ago, and I'm still being given new missions. The Apex beasts don't go down without a fight, especially if you tackle them solo. Such an epic game.

    I've often thought that much of the first paragraph of the article is true about Souls and MH, they appeal to the same kind of player who wants to be encouraged to master the mechanics. I'm not too sure about the rest of the comparison though, and while its true that MH has struggled outside of Japan, it seems to be gaining traction, albeit at the same speed as a limping, wounded Great Jaggi.

    Both series pretty much sum up almost everything I want from action-based computer games though.

    MH is a strange beast in that while there is a lot of overly-complex stuff to get your head around (particularly the armourer/upgrade menus could be streamlined), I think the wackiness and light-hearted humour helps to welcome players by not taking things too seriously. For example, it doesn't really show you dying, cats come and wheel you away on a trolley. There's a mutual sense of fun online with all the silly dancing etc too. It's quite hard to complain about a failed hunt when you've all signed up to fight a shark in your pants (MHTri).
    Reply +21
  • The best 3DS games

  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    @Kasjer
    I like my Vita too but I'm not sure your argument makes sense- it's not like the Vita is brimming over with WRPGs compared to JRPGs either, and seeing as that's the system you can play FFVII on, your post seems more directed at it!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 04/05/2015

    @jammyskis1981
    I dont see how the majority of the third party stuff on 3DS is 'utter shite'.

    Between Monster Hunter, Etrian Odyssey, Phoenix Wright, Fantasy Life, Shovel Knight, SMT, Layton etc, I've spent far more time on them than the first-party stuff. I think the last first-party game I played was Zelda LBW.
    Reply -1
  • redcrayon 03/05/2015

    @DyneVyse
    Technically only chapter 5-7 are the bosses repeated, chapter 8 is the final dungeon and endgame. Not to say you don't have a point.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 03/05/2015

    I would have added Etrian Odyssey IV, EO untold, SMTIV, Fantasy Life and Starfox. I quite liked the last Layton game, Azran Legacy, too.

    Oh, and Persona Q. And Phoenix Wright DD. And Monster Hunter 3G. Just because MH4 is better doesn't mean 3 isn't worth playing!
    Reply +6
  • Code Name: STEAM review

  • redcrayon 02/05/2015

    @Dijon
    What I found odd was that, while, as you say, it wasn't explicitly grid based, the map is and you can count how far you can move in steam points by counting the squares on the floor, even when you move diagonally. It doesn't matter where in each small square you stand, but that is definitely how it's calculated. Makes me wonder why they didn't just say '1 steam point equals 1 square of movement', and I think it's because it might scare off players attracted by the more real -time aspects like the shooting. Interesting stuff!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    @One_Vurfed_Gwrx
    I agree with all of that, thanks!

    Yeah, while I can see the possible abuse of them, the in-mission saves in CNS are potentially a plus point if you can use them sparingly, some of the battle's can take a little while and I'm always worried about battery life, even in sleep mode. I did like the way you could choose to heal one party member or the whole squad for a price too, there are some nice ideas there.

    Agree on Perydwyn's point re. Appealing to new players rather than just genre fans too. Particularly with strategy games, which aren't amongst the most popular of genres outside of the PC. Games that only appeal to the same fans every time are often terrified of trying anything new as they can only lose sales rather than gain them. It's good to see IS taking that line with Fire Emblem too, the next one seems to offer a route for both old and new fans, rather than just a choice of difficulty.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    @perydwyn
    Hey, have you tried Ghost Recon: Shadow Wars? Probably the most underrated launch game on 3DS, but a pretty good turn-based strategy game. You can probably find it really cheap if you want to explore something similar-ish to Xcom, as it was made by the same designer.

    Certainly if you like Codename Steam, it's the closest thing on the system. Although you'll have to put up with the taking-itself-oh-so-seriously gungho nonsense of the Clancyverse instead :D
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    @perydwyn
    That's fair enough. Fair play to them for combining so much weird stuff into it, it's obviously a game where they are determined to stick to a vision for it rather than a target market, which is applaudable. It does make me wonder who is going to buy it though. Do we know how well it sold in the states? The lead characters being American means I'd expect it to be more popular there, but portable games aren't exactly selling loads anywhere outside Japan as a starting point, let alone picking a relatively niche genre. Having a beefy bloke with a gun on the cover doesn't seem to do any harm though!

    The next FE game is coming, so I can't exactly begrudge IS putting out another strategy title that doesn't float my boat, or trying a new IP.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    @One_Vurfed_Gwrx
    I'm not comparing it to a third person shooter at all. Everything I've compared it to is a squad-based, turn-based game that uses overwatch, primarily VC and X-com, as you say.

    Are you thinking I'm referring to the old PC Space Hulk shooter, rather than the board game and the recent turn-based computer game that is a closer port of it?

    Edit: there's some really weird negging going on here
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    @MccyMcFlinn
    Admittedly I have only played through the demo, but the concepts just feel to be fighting each other as a squad-based game to me. If you want to encourage aggressive play and movement from the player, having them with a very small squad and a very limited shared resource for both movement and shooting feels off. That's why both X-com and VC have your firing action as separate to your movement allowance, and why VC lets overwatch happen automatically if you are in the right position and using a weapon capable of it: it becomes about positioning, setting up overlapping fire arcs, and carefully advancing, not choosing between movement or firing or overwatch. Space Hulk makes you choose between all three only because the aliens can't fire at all.

    I'm going to pick it up when it's cheap on the eshop later on.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 01/05/2015

    If the demo was anything to go by it's easily the weakest of Inteliigent System's portable strategy games. I just didn't find the enemy units particularly interesting or that much fun to fight, compared to the whole armies of intricately balanced enemy forces on offer in Fire Emblem and Advance Wars, or even VC or FFT. In Codename Steam it didn't feel like there was a huge amount of strategy in play considering how few units you have to command, and the constant reinforcements make it feel lke it wants to be more of an action game. In a turn-based game where you have four units, you'd think it would be about making every shot count, but the reinforcements just make that pointless, you're better off making a constant advance towards the exit. It means that the enemy makes more use of overwatch than you do, which makes their turns even longer as they have far more opportunity to punish your mistakes than the other way around. Even Space Hullk got the balance right twenty years ago by not allowing the aliens to use overwatch to punish a squad when you are encouraging them to advance.

    I love Valkyria Chronicles, X-com, Advance Wars, Fire Emblem, FFT etc etc, but this just left me cold as a fan of the genre.
    Reply +6
  • Far Cry 4 developer is donating up to $100K to aid Nepal

  • redcrayon 29/04/2015

    @MerricK
    As a general rule, the Red Cross have a better idea of what to send in an emergency than a games publisher. Sending random stuff isn't helpful in a crisis, as it requires manpower to sort, store, manage and distribute. Various charities that specialise in critical response can order things like shelters that are fast to set up, expedite medical teams, that kind of thing. While some money does disappear into managing a response, at least it's not wasting resources on the ground by asking beleaguered local response teams to sort through well-meaning but potentially useless supplies (like shelters not equipped for the terrain/altitude etc).

    As medical and engineering advances have come up with all kinds of specialist kit for emergency relief (flat packed shelters stored near airports with built in power supplies compatible with western medical equipment etc), it also requires a bit of management to teach people how to use it. While the third sector has the same problem as every other industry in that management tends to propogate itself, considering how much milage gamers have got out of WWII, it seems a bit harks to be knocking an aid agency that were helping people then and still doing so today.
    Reply +41
  • Ouya seeks quick sale as debts mount

  • redcrayon 29/04/2015

    @IronSoldier
    Oh, absolutely. As you say, it'll be interesting to see what happens next.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 29/04/2015

    @IronSoldier
    I was curious about the survey data for that story- the link also says that 5% of gamers have preordered more games in the last year, so it's 25% less of a crisis than the opening headline and sentences make it sound. A net 15% reduction in UK respondents who chose to pre-order is still bad for retailers (MCV's target readership), of course, but now I'm wondering what the given reasons for those few who are pre-ordering more often are.

    Five per cent of respondents did say they had actually pre-ordered more games last year. The rest included 49 per cent who said they never pre-ordered anyway, while another 10 per cent said they had pre-ordered about the same (the rest were 'don't knows').

    Maybe they reeally want to play as Goro in MK :D
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 29/04/2015

    I don't know what 'Hells ya!' means, but from the context I'm assuming it means 'abandon ship, we're doomed!' Reply +65
  • Watch over an hour of Xenoblade Chronicles X gameplay

  • redcrayon 25/04/2015

    I feel lucky to have grown up playing games on 8-bit computers. Modern computer games invariably look spectacular to me regardless of whether they are on a WiiU or a playstation or an ipad. Reply +6
  • Xbox sales decreased 20 per cent year-over-year in Q1

  • redcrayon 24/04/2015

    I'm amazed at the commenters who can't view a console as anything other than a raging success or a total failure. I realise pithy comments don't allow for nuance, but still. Over the last thirty years there have been plenty of consoles that wished they had the sales of the XBO.

    Is it disappointing for MS after the 360 spent years out in front of the PS3 in the early half of last gen? Sure.

    I do think it's a good thing that MS seem to have realised that the thing people buy 300 games consoles and online subs for is, er, games and not American football and facebook. It bodes well for next time around for all console manufacturers.
    Reply +10
  • Total War: Warhammer the first title in a trilogy

  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    @Achtung_Englander
    Odds of warhammer eclipsing Total War for mass appeal are slim-to-none. There's room for both and a crossover of fanbases., plus it's not like they don't have multiple teams considering that they are working on mobile Total War games too.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    @Kasjer
    The ideas for 40k's Imperium isn't based 'heavily' on Dune, although the dark, feudal approach to a galactic empire was obviously a touchpoint on release. The concept of psychic navigators is a very small part of it, but even then in Dune they 'fold space' to teleport the entirely human armies of the great Houses that hate each other around. Whereas in 40k most long-distance travel requires a navigator to guide the ship through 'the warp', which is filled with predatory deamons and aliens desperate to get into the ships full of precious human souls. Similar initial starting point but hardly a copy just because the guy at the top is an Emperor.

    The Imperium has also taken references from a hundred other fictional and historical sources. Historical ones include the Inquisition, the Crusades, The Black Death, the British Empire (Preatorians), the Catholic Church (the ecclesiarchy, preachers, cathedrals and their architecture) Russian WWII infantry (Valhalla), Atilla the Hun (Rough Riders) various Greek names (Ultramarines) Templars (Dark Angels) etc etc. Fictional ones included Starship Troopers, The Forever War, Aliens, pretty much any space military fiction prior to 1987. The Even the Horus Heresy (where the marines split into two factions as the Emperor's favourite genetically-engineered son leads half of his 'angels' in rebellion) had various religious touchpoints too. All the most batshit insane stuff in Dune doesn't come close to some of the Adeptus Mechanicus, or the relentlessly dark sacrifices of endless hordes of psykers to keep the corpse-emperor alive and holding back chaos.

    It's a huge hotchpotch of (often poorly written but sometimes great) stuff comprising hundreds of books written by dozens of writers worth of it's own lore over three decades, saying that The Imperium's background ideas heavily come from one source just doesn't work when it's put it's own twist on so many references. It's also come up with a lot of widely-imitated fresh ideas, as well as touched on endless references in order to parody hundreds of individual sources/cultures as their own factions/worlds/armies to fill out the galaxy, and sell new kits every year. I'd say Warhammer is a much closer fit for your argument, as it took decades for GW to find an identity for it's own High Elves, Orcs, Goblins, Trolls, Treemen, Halflings, Wood Elves and Dwarves that isn't just LOTR and D&D. Those factions, along with Bretonnia, have much clearer sources than the teeming, stinking mass of humanity that comprises The Imperium, I reckon.
    Reply +3
  • Everybody's Gone to the Rapture and the particular joy of the British apocalypse

  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    No mention of The Kraken Wakes? Wyndham's best quasi-apocalyptic tale in my book, and essential reading for X-com: Terror from the Deep fans. Or just fans of sci-fi in general. It's a shame it has never been filmed the way Triffids has multiple times, but it would require something more of an effects budget than several walking plant suits and a flamethrower!

    It also encompasses the 'cosy catastrophe', as a pair of lovely middle-class journalists enjoy a gentle existence as radio operators while the sea level rises, the survivors generally behave themselves, aliens attack etc.

    Great article though, more like that please.
    Reply +10
  • Probing the latest Mass Effect 4 leak

  • redcrayon 21/04/2015

    What is it with fantasy/sci-fi and naming their ancient races? It just seems really unimaginative that they are always referred to as something like forerunners/precursors/old ones/ancients/remnants etc. Sure, it's evocative of their role in the story, but the 'they didn't leave their names but they did leave enough weird weaponry to level the universe' idea is such a cliche. A whole universe of possibility and we're still a space marine on the trail of a super-weapon. Same goes for Bioware and their current trend of 'player is both space/chainmail jesus and the coolest commander with the most resources and most friends ever'. Why the ego stroking? I'd love to see an rpg that dealt with the smaller issues of advanced sci-fi/space exploration without glossing over it due to having to see it down the scope of a rifle and against a background of saving humanity yet again, but I suppose multiplayer deathmatch requires it.

    It's not just computer games, authors seem to struggle with it too. I suppose it's an easy way to include space magic macguffins without having to commit to coherent motivations for antagonists beyond 'when I get this I can control the galaxy bwah hah hah!'.

    Still, much as the ME3 ending sucked, I'm really looking forward to this. The series had too many great moments in it's 100 hour running time to write off for one red/green/blue pill.
    Reply 0
  • Rich Stanton on: Skill and the random element

  • redcrayon 19/04/2015

    @gregsheppard
    Agree on randomness in multiplayer not hobbling one side from the start, and that AW is fantastic. I do prefer FE though, as I like a bit of a random element in strategy games, and the hit percentages rather than swapping-off hit points in AW supplies that. I do like the AW/Panzer Tactics etc mechanic that a units HP and attack strength are linked though, rather than fantasy games where a unit hits at full strength even when it only has 1 HP left. TBH I love all kinds of strategy games and have spent hundreds of hours with both :-)

    I preferred AW before Dual Strike though, where multiple commander powers in a row ruined the core, precise balance between units for me. Particularly when Eagle could spam two turns in a row, that kind of thing. It's not random, but it did put a gimmick out in front of the true beauty of AW which is the careful balance of all of the unit choices, their cost, counters etc. Dark Conflict wasn't too bad though.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 19/04/2015

    @StixxUK
    That reminds me of Mario Kart too. A good player will still beat a poor one 95% of the time, and the random element helps keep it interesting when there is a vast disparity in skill, like when playing at home if you have young children.

    But I think players objected in MKWii where the skill difference online was minimal, the time between first and last place only a matter of seconds, but the items given out the same in their ability to shake up the game as if the player in sixth was a lap behind rather than three seconds. MK8 feels a bit better in that regard. Having said that, MK is a game where a good player recognises that just being the fastest isn't the only strategy- item availability is predictable in their power level, so there is an advantage in being back in third/fourth. There is also a kind of balance in that the player in first wasn't getting murdered by everyone in the pack with triple shells, and also was the least likely to get hit by stars and bullet bills as the players at the back move up. They view it that they are miles ahead because they are the best, but really they might just be miles ahead because their threats are only coming from one direction.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    @KanePaws
    All fair points.

    Personally I prefer the tension of moving on without a character now and then rather than worrying about missing a few lines of dialogue or the sentence regarding what they do afterwards in the end credits.

    Although one of the FE games (Shadow Dragon? Can't remember) offers you new units only available if other ones have been slaughtered to the point that you are desperately in need of reinforcements. Truly a nightmare for the player who wants to see everything! :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    @Bernkastel
    Fair enough, I do appreciate that in an SRPG, you get more attached to characters than to unnamed units in other strategy games, same goes for xcom.

    My favourite FE campaign was when one of my best units died halfway through, and I decided not to restart the mission. He was a bit of a crutch, and it forced me to step up my fame for the next few levels as the other cgaracters couldn't just let him absorb damage any more. I suppose that's one of the addictive things about it, you have control of an army, soldiers die in war, but you have the option to replay the mission in exactly the same way and change the fate of any unit. Just being able to do that makes the choice to continue on without them hard sometimes.

    I do tend to let annoying child and animal characters die though, especially if their dialogue is particularly awful.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    With Monster Hunter players seem to be on a constant hunt for a perfect gear set, particularly mining for the right talisman when there are a near-infinite amount of potential variations, or spending hours grinding for relic weapons that are incrementally better than each other and have the right amount of slots needed for their 'perfect' skill set.

    The trick is not to build sets around kit you don't have. I've always just improvised around what I've been given, and seen the randomness as part of the fun.

    With Fire Emblem, players often dislike that enemies are capable of critical hits (3x damage) too. Again, this comes from the obsessive desire to keep everyone alive, a perfect save file in a strategy game about leading a fantasy army. When I play Total War, I don't worry when my elite crusader units get annihilated by a series of disasters, and so it doesn't bother me when Timmy the 12-year-old battlemage gets stabbed in the face by a plucky enemy swordsman. More xp for the luckier combatants :D Maybe it's just the desire for 'perfection' that puts players at odds with a RNG.

    Seeing as FE is already a game where you can see enemy movement and attack ranges, and count on them moving solely to inflict the most damage each turn, I don't think a player is much of a strategist if they can only continue when the enemy is entirely predictable and never has any good luck, while remains at the mercy of the pmayer's good fortune and godlike vision.
    Reply +6
  • Battlefield: Hardline trumps Bloodborne in March US retail sales

  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    Fair enough, i think we're stumbling towards a grudging agreement so I'll leave it there :-)
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @mega-gazz
    Only 10% of PS3 owners bought TLOU and that was just as critically acclaimed, and featured guns and zombies, probably two of the most popular elements in games in recent years.

    Just because a game doesn't have as broad, mass market appeal as Battlefield, GTA or CoD doesn't mean it's awful. Do you seriously take sales figures as an indication of quality despite almost unanimous acclaim elsewhere?

    An awful lot of the best games of all time were bought by well under 10% of the system owners. Expecting everyone, not just forumites but also the vastly greater number of who only buy two games a year, to turn out for a niche Japanese action game that released the week after guns, cops n'robbers is just silly. As is you trying to paint a niche series greatly increasingly in popularity as some kind of sales fail.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    It depends on your starting point.

    If we accept that all player bases are equal in skill, no matter the franchise or niche, then sure, I would agree, percentage of them beating mid-point bosses is interesting.

    However, Bloodborne still only has a small number of people playing compared to a larger western ego-stroking shooter/rpg published by EA and sold to a wider audience. If Bloodborne's player base consists of more dedicated players, including a large chunk of the fanbase of the Souls games, then any comparison is meaningless. Surely we'd be better off looking at those gamers who we know have played both, and I think that, of those, the opinion of 'Bloodborne is easier' would be a less popular one.

    I mean, I wouldn't expect to compare the total of players who don't progress past high-rank bosses on Monster Hunter with those not progressing past mid-level bosses on CoD and expect to come up with any useful stats either, when you can't prove it's the same group of players or the same level of skill.

    All this aside, I agree with you that anyone can get into Bloodborne, I just don't think it has the same casual appeal as Bioware games, especially the more recent relatively streamlined ones. It's increased sales feels like it's more due to word of mouth about how awesome it is rather than that it's easy to get into.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    I don't think Bloodborne is impenetrable at all, but your logic of comparing players who have beaten first bosses is flawed.

    DA and ME have a long lead up to their first real bosses, allowing time to explore but also time for players to get bored and give up- you can't claim that just because a player hasn't progressed past a boss, it means that they reached it and couldn't defeat it due to it's difficulty. In Bioware's titles they could have wandered around for quite a while, and also the battle systems are far more forgiving, requiring less crucial timing.

    Bloodborne is much more claustrophobic and intense, which is a good thing for a game with horror elements. Bioware tends to make their games as welcoming as possible, hence the 'you are space/chainmail jesus' ego stroking.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @mega-gazz
    Considering this was US sales, ranting at 'you PS4 owners' on Eurogamer seems a bit pointless.

    Mega western franchise with mass shootbang appeal, available on five platforms and for an extra week, outsells niche, critically acclaimed Japanese action game available on one platform in the US. Not really sure what your point is. Battlefield selling shitloads (despite selling less than previous entry due to being a spin-off), when it was the only multiplat shooter out that month, was inevitable, whereas Bloodborne's sales are a great indication of a cult game with a growing fanbase due to word of mouth. Not all games are created equal in sales potential.
    Reply +2
  • Gunstar Heroes, Streets of Rage 2 and Sonic 2 heading to 3DS

  • redcrayon 15/04/2015

    SoR2 is easily my favourite megadrive game, can't wait for this. Reply +1
  • Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate passes 1m shipped milestone in West

  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Fair points. I suppose my counter-point to that is that our discussion hinges on exactly how niche MH is outside of Japan. Your example of Dark Souls at least has the advantage of being a single-player, blood-soaked, dark-fantasy action rpg, which has a very healthy appeal to western gamers- it appeals to both rpg fans and fans of the character action games with their deep combat mechanics. I'm not sure a quirky, largely co-op, firmly-Japanese-in-style loot 'em up like MH has even the same appeal as Souls outside of Japan at the moment.

    I think MH4 is a landmark moment for the series in terms of western appeal though, it feels like the press have finally realised what it is, and multiplat feels ultimately inevitable, it's just a matter of when.

    I also think the sheer depth of systems and the focus on unrelenting enemies and player skill over xp and stat upgrades gives Souls and MH something in common that might well have helped MH over the last couple of years in terms of word-of-mouth from dedicated gamers, but that's another discussion!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Monster Hunter has been a niche interest in the west for a long time, having started as a Japanese curiosity and requiring a vibrant online community where friends can play together. It remains primarily targeted at a Japanese player base that's profitable enough to support it alone. Dragon's Dogma, at the moment, consists of a single game that was their most expensive ever project to develop, was tailor-made for and directly targeted at western rpg fans, and the pawn system mattered nowhere near as much in terms of friends playing and slaying together. No wonder they have taken a different amount of time to grow outside of Japan- DD was designed from scratch for overseas.

    The development and curation of each franchise has different factors in play, I don't see how they are comparable. Capcom have already said that they didn't want to split the playerbase, and I'm not sure that splitting it over 3DS/WiiU/PS3/PS4/PSV/XBO globally would really be worth the cost of both HD development and running costs for ongoing much smaller online communities.

    Sure, it would have sold more copies, but you've got to weigh that against vastly increased development costs, plus the loss of Nintendo shouldering the marketing costs, plus not including the fans who would have bought the 3DS version anyway. While i sympathise with gamers who want multiplat MH (I want to see it on other systems too as obviously the game can be beautiful) I'm just not convinced that there is enough interest for that to be viable. Yet. :D Let's hope it gets to the point where MH is so huge worldwide that a community on any popular platform becomes an inevitability,
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @whatfruit
    Citation needed. Have you got a link?

    The deal for Monster Hunter on Nintendo platforms was that they help promote it overseas, I very much doubt large bags of cash were needed outside of that, both Capcom and Ninty profit from it. The idea that the fate of a franchise of such huge importance to Capcom would be decided by such a short-term factor as who had deeper pockets in 2012 rather than who was better placed to help them achieve growth on portables in the west seems a bit odd.
    Reply 0
  • Titan Souls walkthrough and game guide

  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    It isn't even out on PSN yet, wouldn't it have been better to wait until the weekend when readers have had a go and maybe got a bit stuck or something? Reply +1