redcrayon Comments

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  • Switch's eccentric new hardware is a link to Nintendo's past in the most exciting way

  • redcrayon 18/01/2018

    @mega-gazz
    Theyíve also got Pokemon, Mario, Animal Crossing and their respective mobile games. Itís not like this is the only thing Nintendo is selling to children, the above were all designed for children first before they grew up.
    Reply 0
  • Nintendo has announced Nintendo Labo, a bizarre new interactive cardboard toy line

  • redcrayon 18/01/2018

    @Incubati0n
    Do you really begrudge a toy company occasionally making stuff for kids, and especially after a year where they just released the best Zelda and Mario games in ages, backed up by a load of other quality software for their long-time, now grown-up fans?

    Itís OK not to want this stuff. They already said it isnít aimed at you, the Switchís focus for computer games isnít entirely based around it and theyíve still got all their usual IP on the way later on. What I do know is my
    kid is far more interested in this than the usual swords and guns that have made up the Nintendo games Iíve played since I was a child, and that makes me happy.

    Itís great to see the games industry cater to young players with the odd product rather than just selling toys to adults who think play should revolve around them.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 18/01/2018

    This is made even funnier by the Amazon ads Iím seeing in the EG article with a picture of a cardboard shipping box and Ďshop now!í underneath. Finally, google ads gets it right :D Reply +1
  • redcrayon 18/01/2018

    @deathrowghost
    A kid spilling their drink over a cardboard piece where you can print a template off the internet and make a replacement part as a project together out of any shipping box youíve got lying around is better than them spilling their drink over a pro controller.
    Reply +4
  • Nintendo Switch announcement tonight to reveal "new interactive experience"

  • redcrayon 17/01/2018

    One minute I was board rigid, the next I was creasing up. I can see my family banding together over this. Crafty move by Nintendo. Reply +2
  • New UK studio from makers of Driveclub, MotorStorm

  • redcrayon 15/01/2018

    Best of luck Wushu Studios, looking forward to hearing about it later on. Reply 0
  • Learning to speak Monster Hunter

  • redcrayon 14/01/2018

    You can speak Monster Hunter when youíve got the best hat in the village, made from the tail of some nightmarish beast, and are yet more concerned about the precise grilling to perfection of ten steaks at a time :D

    I felt quite lucky at having a load of EG regulars show me how to play when Tri launched, its been a gaming passion of mine ever since.
    Reply +6
  • Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp is secretly Nintendo's first Early Access game

  • redcrayon 12/01/2018

    @tomphillipsEG
    Not always a distinction you make when reporting on what Nintendo is releasing though :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 12/01/2018

    Wouldnít that title go to FE Heroes though, which also has had a load of different modes and several times the amount of initial maps added since its launch almost a year ago? Reply +3
  • Gorgeous nature-themed platform adventure Fe is launching in February

  • redcrayon 12/01/2018

    @Khazmo
    Howís that working out for you? :D
    Reply +3
  • Pokťmon Go will drop support for older iPhones and iPads

  • redcrayon 10/01/2018

    @LordDemigod
    No, because it would have been unreasonable not to support iPhone 5 in summer 2016. Because of that, then letting kids pour hundreds of hours into it then pulling the plug on them barely 18 months later unless they suddenly come into a new device costing several hundred pounds seems a bit mean to me, and like a lack of forward planning on the part of the developers.

    Theyíve made a huge amount of cash off of this. Is there really no way they could create a Ďlightí version that allows young users with older devices that have helped make it such a success to keep playing and collecting (with limited functionality) until they can upgrade?
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 10/01/2018

    @LordDemigod
    Pokemon Go is only 18 months old. Binning platforms that worked fine with it at launch when they were happy to take the money spent on offered micro transactions only 18 months ago seems like incredibly rapid obsolescence in comparison.
    Reply +13
  • redcrayon 10/01/2018

    @Bekkersly
    It matters because children are far less likely to have an up-to-date phone than a hand-me-down one, as the cost of having multiple phone upgrades and/or newer models in a family is extremely high. Not to mention that kids are more likely to break them, so the cheap older model revisions lets them benefit from a family iCloud etc while still being reasonably replaceable.

    If itís software aimed at adults I can see why some devices get left behind but kids are going to be a few years behind the curve. Even then itís annoying, I use an iPhone 5 myself and have no particular reason to upgrade apart from the ridiculous bloatware IOS upgrades gradually reducing the functionality of older devices.
    Reply +8
  • Monster Hunter World gets a final PS4 beta

  • redcrayon 05/01/2018

    @Dysisa
    Yeah, Deviljho is a wyvern that uses Dragon attacks, itís not complicated :D

    Iíll never forget the first time I ran into Jho with a load of fellow hunters from the EG forums when we were playing MH Tri on release, he wasted our entire team with one breath weapon attack. Best tutorial on the value of elemental resistances and weaknesses in the game :-)
    Reply 0
  • World Health Organisation now lists "hazardous gaming" as health disorder

  • redcrayon 02/01/2018

    @MrTomFTW
    Exactly. WHO.
    Iím sure the Beebís favourite time traveller has many problems with gaming. I understand that Skaro has shitty WiFi but have no sympathy with cheating timey-wimey bastards messing with the in-game clock.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 02/01/2018

    @The_Goon
    Either that or mobile gamers stumbling into the road pursuing Pokťmon, or lorry drivers playing Candy Crush on the motorway.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 02/01/2018

    @brazzauk
    The headline would have been clearer if it had been ďWHO adds Ďhazardous gamingĒ to existing list of health disordersí.

    This isnít singling gaming out, itís adding it to a compendium that will include a wide variety of activities that can become addictive, to which those with addictive personalities are perhaps particularly vulnerable.

    This isnít about targeting gaming or dragging it through the mud (although if itís a slow news day soon you can expect that from the tabloids), recognition invites research and can help people get help.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 02/01/2018

    @Loneck
    Sounds like CEX will be a stockist of the final product.
    Reply 0
  • Eurogamer readers' top 50 games of 2017

  • redcrayon 01/01/2018

    @bladdard
    I think the mix of multi plats, indie, AAA and new original IP without a battleground, battlefield and call of duty anywhere near the top 10 and very few pay to wins gives a very credible top 50.
    I think itís gives a very credible top 50 detailing the platforms EG readers use the most. The lack of portable, mobile and VR titles isnít indicative that there was nothing worth playing there though, just that those platforms arenít anywhere near as popular with EG readers as PS4/PC/Switch.
    Reply +13
  • redcrayon 01/01/2018

    @NeoVDR
    To be fair the methodology of taking a vote and assigning points based on their position in the list was the same for the staff and readers (besides the whole Ďfudging the top ten in the pubí element). Itís just that the staff is obviously much smaller and so their personal taste is more visible, whereas oddball picks, the high placement of whatever multiplayer stuff a small group is playing in their office and very niche titles get smoothed out by sheer popularity in the readers list.

    Assassins Creed placed very highly today too- it seems like the sheer apathy EG have for open-world games isnít the same for the readers, as opposed to GAAS.
    Reply +20
  • redcrayon 01/01/2018

    Interesting to see the readers top ten is all lengthy single player adventures rather than the online multiplayer titles, when taking the pulse of who reads EG (and can be arsed to vote).

    Definitely amusing to see all the curious posters wondering why Mass Effect Andromeda has a mid-table entry in the staff list, then it turns up mid-table in the reader list too! Edith Finch takes a fairly big hit in the reader list, and Persona, Nier and Horizon all jump into the top five instead.
    Reply +62
  • redcrayon 01/01/2018

    @Some_Goats
    I voted for Steamworld Dig 2, Fire Emblem Echoes, Ys vIII and Monster Hunter Stories (in addition to BotW) so at least one of my faves made it in! :D
    Reply +4
  • Eurogamer's games of 2017: The big debate

  • redcrayon 31/12/2017

    @Tomo
    I think Image and Form ended up redoing one of the Steamworld icons because of online discussion. So it is a Ďthingí, albeit an incredibly, bizarrely niche one :D
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 31/12/2017

    @ChrisTapsellEG
    I appreciate that you want to cater to readers tastes in proportion, thatís why most outlets focus on AAA games to the detriment of everything else, but surely it also rounds out EGs editorial content if there was slightly more coverage of VR, mobile and portable software. On any given day thereís almost guaranteed to be something about the big GAAS titles, but I also read EG to find out about the odd niche title and the general variety of what the industry offers too. If I just wanted to hear about Destiny and Battlefront I could get that from relatively mainstream news outlets with small gaming departments like Metro etc, as opposed to a specialist gaming website like your good selves! Otherwise you end up with only having people interested in the big stuff visiting as less and less comments on smaller stuff means less and less coverage. I mean, you having Edith Finchís at no.2 shows thereís editorial value in covering smaller titles even if they arenít tentpole releases.

    I appreciate both this article and you replying to comments though :-)
    Reply +12
  • redcrayon 31/12/2017

    @JoelStinty
    I think this is a really good point, as genres have merged and RPG elements are in loads of single player games, the average run time of the big single player titles is huge, while GAAS titles can occupy someone for months or years.

    I mean, I like JRPGs and played four this year, but the shortest one took me 60 hours and a month to finish, and Iím not someone to grind or hang about for the post-game stuff.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 31/12/2017

    @Whitster
    Just to play devilís advocate here, does Nier really Ďchange the way we think about narrative?í with a similar impact to BotWís dominance of open-world discussion?

    I mean, any open-world game next year is going to be compared to BotW, I donít think all cinematic single player games are going to be compared to Nier going forward (for good or ill). Thatís not a criticism of it, Iím sure it challenges the concept within itself and have seen a few discussions on forums about it, itís just that I donít think it has quite provoked an industry-wide discussion about narrative in a similar way to BotW and open-world. Perhaps thatís because of Zeldaís general higher visibility, the more immediate visability of whatís different etc.

    Of course if it turns out that everything from God of War to Spider-Man or Red Dead etc all have their narrative structure compared to Nier A, I shall concede the point this time next year! :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 31/12/2017

    Wes: PUBG should be Eurogamer's game of the year. Everyone's playing PUBG. Who here is still playing Zelda?

    Double Tap: Some games aren't made to be
    played consistently over months. Some games are finite.
    I thought this exchange was interesting. Wesís point is exactly what the big publishers want us to think about GAAS in general, that, if locked into a gameís repetitive content all year, that itís a wonderful thing, when itís actually the cheapest, most cut-and-paste way of providing an hour of gaming while rinsing players for cash month in, month-out. I played Fire Emblem Heroes for twenty minutes every day on the train this year, those minutes add up to a lot of hours, and the idea that, by such logic, it was the best game I played compared to all the awesome other single player games I loved is a bit silly. Just because a game is addictive and with a carefully designed business model based around providing daily content thatís just diffferent enough to make it a comforting habit to return to doesnít make it better than content crafted to actually be fun for its own sake.

    @EG
    In terms of the staffís general feelings, it was good to see an admittance of apathy towards even very good open-world games, yet widespread enthusiasm towards GAAS you think are massively flawed cash-cows yet keep returning to for some reason. Thereís a reason for that, and after a year of some great articles investigating such business models, hopefully the recognition of the effect this has had on a group of gaming journalists, let alone the general customer base is worth bearing in mind going forwards.

    but how did we settle on the top 10? A mixture of science and alcohol, it turns out.
    I realise this is a tongue-in-cheek opener but Ďwe took a vote then fudged the results in the pubí is a bit closer to the latter than the former, I feel! :D Happy new year EG.
    Reply +65
  • Eurogamer's Top 50 Games of 2017: 10-1

  • redcrayon 30/12/2017

    @MrTomFTW
    Alphabetical order? Iím fed up of the mods around here and EGís bias towards A games.
    Reply +12
  • redcrayon 30/12/2017

    @Malek86
    Thatís true, fair enough. I think their tendency to use mobile games as digital marketing for the console ones means that itís probably closer than we think.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 30/12/2017

    @Malek86
    Most of the Nintendo big hitters have been released all at once in 2017, and next year we are unlikely to get another Mario Kart, Zelda, 3D Mario or Splatoon. Maybe Metroid Prime 4 or Bayonetta 3, but that
    sounds very unlikely for 2018.
    Animal Crossing: New Leaf has sold well over 11m copies. Itís more of a Ďbig hitterí than Metroid or Bayonetta by a long way, despite their consistent critical acclaim, I think thereís good odds weíll see it as one of their broader-audience games next year.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 30/12/2017

    @GuybrushThreepwood
    Is the most obvious answer really a conspiracy theory than having the first thing to jump to mind when asked Ďwhat was good this yearí being the ones they played in multiplayer in the office? I mean, do you think they are on the take for Mario + Rabbids and Arms too? If I had been playing any of those four games a couple of times a week on my lunch breaks with friends at work Iíd probably have voted for them too, instead of all single player games.

    Anyway, interesting reading. I only played one game off of EGís top 50 this year so plenty to add to the list and catch up on later on. Looking forward to the refined taste of the reader list, get the port and cheese out, in sure it will be a discussion of quality amongst civilised minds! :D
    Reply +6
  • Eurogamer's Top 50 Games of 2017: 20-11

  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @Murton
    So basically youíre suggesting reviewers would buy a game then put in an expenses claim, being down the value of the game until the claim was processed along with their invoice? Iím not really sure how a journalist surrendering £60 for a few weeks rather than using review code really teaches them the value of something as opposed to just sounding like a tabloid-esque arbitrary punishment for doing their job. It would be immediately streamlined because people arenít stupid, as a freelance Iíd just start asking for the £60 upfront to account for such an unfair policy if it was routine, at which point itís easier (and more time-efficient if you want the review done for release day) just to hand out review code.

    Press trips really arenít all sunshine either, as someone that works in publishing (not games though) I can tell you from experience that tight cost-control means jollies stopped being about all-expenses-paid sunny holidays with the odd interview/meeting a long time ago. HR departments are pretty hot on eyeballing anything that looks like a gift or a reward rather than work-related if itís more expensive than the odd box of crap biscuits or a mass-produced mug with a logo on it at Christmas. Bloody things always have the handle fall off like those Cadburyís mugs that come with Easter Eggs :D

    Besides, as far as I remember EGís company policy is already to avoid them as far as possible and pay for travel/accommodation, or declare anything like that under the article, for the reasons you hint at, that itís hard to give an unbiased opinion of a game youíve only been allowed to play in a controlled environment.

    I appreciate that if you donít write for a living in 2017, games publishing looks like being paid to sit around and play games where other people like us pay a lot of money for the privilege, but I donít think removing the value from a writerís bank account for a few weeks is fair any more than I think a restaurant, film or travel critic should be (temporarily) out of pocket to Ďteach them the value of the productí either. What looks like a perk of the job on the outside is balanced by mundane note-taking, working around press officers, plenty of unpaid hours playing something you donít want to, unpaid hours spent travelling, and random trips spent away from your family if you do it for a living. If my editor asked me to spend dozens of hours interacting with and critiquing a new piece of software for little more than a couple of times my day rate (let alone have me surrender a temporary £60 up front for the privilege!) Iíd laugh, and yet that seems common in commissioning for games publishing.

    edit: sorry for rant Murton, this is probably more about me venting about publishing in general. I agree in principle with you that a reviewer shouldnít be flippant with regard to the £60 purchase price a customer is expected to pay.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @Murton
    In fact I think games writers should pay for everything they review. The review for a broken game you were given for free will be much more forgiving than a broken game you had to out £60 of your own money down for.
    I understand the sentiment of perceived value taking a massive hit when you get something for free, but how much do you think a games reviewer gets paid if you think they should take a £60 hit before writing each article? If youíre expecting them to pay £60 then spend effectively a working week or more finishing an RPG, at the point they get paid theyíll barely be reimbursed at all.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @Dizzy
    Iíve only played one so far :D
    Reply -4
  • Eurogamer's Top 50 Games of 2017: 30-21

  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @Robertoverge
    To put all these absolute trash indie (sorry, but people need to stop trying to be cool and putting them on the same pedestal as good triple a titles) ahead of these titles in lunacy. The joke is over. You are not cool for liking them.
    Dismissing indie games as Ďabsolute trashí, that AAA games are automatically better than other titles, claiming you stopped reading EG ages ago and that Persona isnít ranked high enough. This is like an entire comments thread in one post. Not everyone gives a shit about teen drama, growing pains etc, and I say that as someone who really likes P4.

    Suffice to say I disagree with you. I like the articles here and donít think AAA titles are automatically of higher quality or have a greater claim to coverage. There are great and poor indie games as much as there are great and poor AAA ones, which is why the most common complaint here is about Mass Effect. Any site that only covers the biggest games is one I canít be arsed to read as that info is everywhere. They already tediously suck up the editorial oxygen all year round, leaving hundreds of even medium-size games uncovered, no need for them to have the entirety of the end of year discussion focus on the handful of games everyone has already read loads of articles about too.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @GreyBeard
    Yeah, I kinda agree with you there. I think EG donít take it as seriously as their readers do, and that occasional irreverence is what some people like about the site, others not so much.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 29/12/2017

    @GreyBeard
    What conclusions are we supposed to take from this?
    That it isnít entirely out of the bounds of possibility for a set of reviews by individuals with specific tastes throughout the year, and the combined results of a vote by a load of people months later, to come up with different results? Itís possible for a reviewer to find a game to be amazing and half their colleagues to find it bores them to tears, JRPGs in particular seem to be a bit marmite these days, same goes for lots of stuff that might be wonderful within itís niche. In a similar vein, even if every reviewer said shooter x or sports game y was fantastic, Iíd still be unlikely to bother playing it, let alone vote for it. If the methodology was framed around selecting games based on only the 2017 EG reviewer opinions rather than a rough vote amongst the entire staff, Iíd agree with you. The conclusion to draw is that this is roughly what the EG staff, on average, enjoyed this year, rather than a straight-laced, objective attempt to place games of wildly different appeal in order of quality.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @fitzy1982
    Thanks for the thought-out reply, yeah, thatís much clearer, fair enough! Enjoy the rest of the holiday, letís see what the readers list comes up with :D
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @Malek86

    most of the games in this list are made by tens, if not hundreds of people. Actually, most of the games in the previous lists and probably the next ones too. That's already proof enough, I think.
    Yeah, fair point, youíre absolutely right. Bit of a weak argument on my part there.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @fitzy1982
    I think the reason that you don't have several big hitters featuring is more to do with editorial loose discipline, than the broad range of games in 2017. Though that is a recognised thing too.
    What do you mean Ďnot featuring?í Theyíve already appeared in this list of Ďtop 50 gamesí, had plenty of coverage earlier this year, and will certainly appear in the readers list too. I suspect a more accurate interpretation of your point is Ďloose editorial discipline meant that you didnít vote my favourites to feature more highly hereí, but I can see why you didnít put that as it sounds a touch more petty than pretending that your favourites didnít get a mention at all.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @albertino
    This isnít a list composed by a bunch of judges sitting around a table, with shortlists and criteria establishing ranking and taking every single one of the hundreds of games released into consideration. Itís a list of the results of a vote by a relatively small bunch of people who didnít play everything, and didnít all play your favourites.
    Reply +6
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @JoelStinty
    I agree- if I was asked to vote as part of a few dozen office workers, realistically Iíve only played half a dozen long games this year, so it would be hard for me to stick multiple 80 hour games on my ballot even if they are utterly amazing or whatever. My ballot would include loads more smaller titles, those that I had played with my mates on my lunch break and the handful of lengthy games I actually finished. Multiply that by 30-odd and I can see how the EG staff list forms up. The problem is people taking whatís a bit of fun as some definitive statement of ranking to use as ammunition for online warz.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    Iím hoping to see Steamworld Dig 2 in the top 20. Long odds perhaps, but I loved it. Reply +1
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    @TiGerrr_Uppercut
    This list was compiled (I think) as a vote by EG staff and contributors. The readers list compiled by public vote normally follows it.

    Note that the relatively small number of contributors to the staff vote always makes it a bit more random than the public vote that aligns much closer to sales and popular opinion. The upside is that smaller titles that ended up being played by much of the staff have a far higher chance of appearance than the public vote, where anything that wasnít either a cult hit or a critically acclaimed big seller struggles to get into the top 50. The downside is what looks like oddball picks that favour staff curiosity (possibly of the morbid type in the case of ME...) over popularity. Alternatively, that can be another upside depending on how much you enjoy these threads :D
    Reply +17
  • redcrayon 28/12/2017

    This is going to be a fun comments thread. Does seem a bit odd to have ME:A up there when all the staff quotes about it seem lukewarm at best towards it. Maybe itís just that lots of the contributors actually played it (as opposed to some of the other games) due to it being multi format, high expectations based on the previous games etc?

    Good to see AC Origins getting some credit. AC was gaining a rep for being shovelled out each year, but Origins is pretty good. It had its thunder almost completely stolen by Horizon and Zelda framing the discussion about open world games around themselves early in the year as they launched together (not that thatís a bad thing, both excellent etc) but itís still exactly what the AC franchise needed, and proof that hundreds of people working on a mega-franchise can still turn in some imaginative, creative work if given time and good direction.
    Reply +25
  • Eurogamer's Top 50 Games of 2017: 40-31

  • redcrayon 27/12/2017

    @Mr.Spo
    Did you try Monster Hunter Stories? Iím determined to advocate for it as no one else will :D
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 27/12/2017

    @Sea-360

    Sony publishes games for the sake of the diversity of the platform all the time, despite individual games not being profitable, presumably because it make the platform as a whole more interesting.
    Isnít that kind of what Nintendo are doing with Bayonetta? Publishing something because it rounds out the console with something they donít have? All companies want to make money, on this point of whether a company sees something as profitable or not, I donít blame a company for not doing something they will lose money on, and donít think Nintendo are especially poor in this regard. I do agree that NoAís initial decision not to publish a major Nintendo title in Xenoblade was silly though, and also that their back catalogue is routinely expensive. However, Iím not sure that refusing to discount your products as quickly as possible is a bad thing- again, it seems understandable to me from a business perspective rather than being an innately Ďrobber baroní move. Thereís a reason most western AAA games are heavily discounted six months later and it isnít the publishers being incredibly generous, itís that they go for massive regional print runs as itís cheaper per copy, but get stuck with masses of overstock after launch that costs retail to keep on shelves. Itís easy to look at things as a customer and think Ďcheap games good!í, but itís not a result of publisher generosity as opposed to market forces. Nintendo games tend to hold their value, even the ones with huge print runs like Mario Kart. We could argue till the cows come home as to why, but this is heading off topic.

    I agree with some of your points and not others, happy to leave it there.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 27/12/2017

    @Mr.Spo
    What Iíd be interested in is an article each covering what was released on mobile and the 3DS/Vita etc- both of which rarely get much coverage in end of year lists compared to the titles that gained the lionís share of the coverage all year round.

    On the other hand, itís understandable, in a roundabout way, that if they donít get much coverage all year there isnít much for the writers to recap at the end :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 27/12/2017

    @Sea-360
    It is ok to piss on Sony and Microsoft, but Nintendo is sacred, despite being the worst robber capitalists in the entire gaming industry.
    I think publishers rubbing their hands with glee at putting lootboxes in paid games and claiming itís a feature have a slightly bigger claim to that this year.

    Honestly, itís not like Sonyís games havenít won plenty of awards from EG in the past- Bloodborne took the EG GOTY in 2015 and Uncharted 2 in 2009, as far as I remember, thatís not exactly a history of pissing on or bias against Sony, is it.

    Nintendo has had a very strong year after spending some time in the wilderness, thatís all.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 27/12/2017

    @Ragnor
    Thatís what Iíve been thinking since I first saw the art for it. That and the Transformer dinobots. Robot dinosaurs will never not be cool :D
    Reply +4