redcrayon Comments

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  • Fatherhood isn't the shortcut to emotional complexity games wish it was

  • redcrayon 28/06/2016

    @dagas
    Good point. Agree that dad sims are also really about recognising the current average age of those buying western AAA titles, and the thing that might resonate with them the strongest. Romancing sixteen year old girls starts to feel a bit odd when you're pushing 40 and the wife keeps looking up from her phone with an eyebrow raised :-)

    Perhaps it's also about having close relationships in games that aren't all between people of the same peer group and first loves etc, which resonates with younger people more. Although I'd concede that your Uncle and cousin in P4 make it a nicely rounded view of life as a teenager too.

    Agree that P4 is brill though. isn't it ten years old now? Interested to see P5.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 28/06/2016

    I've often thought that the trend for 'dad as violent protector' in computer games is a transitional step towards more emotional maturity in AAA games, as it's one that still allows the player to revel in violence while also providing them with a loose justification for it. It effectively allows the player to be both the powerful, skilled aggressor and also have a moral superiority of defending something good.

    Having said that, part of parenthood is preparing them for the world they will live in. While that means, for my daughter, similar stuff to what Nathan mentions in the article, if I was raising a child in the game worlds of TLOU, God of War or Dishonored, damn right I'd be teaching them to shoot straight in between sticking the bubble writing on the blood-spattered fridge! :D
    Reply +3
  • The new Monster Hunter feels like a best of Capcom's series, but it's not quite the best

  • redcrayon 27/06/2016

    As someone who only got into the series with Tri, I suspect much of generations might as well be new content to me. Looking forward to Aerial lance, it's MH Dragoon time! :-)

    Foraging as a cat sounds quite relaxing too when just looking for materials.
    Reply +2
  • The UK's two biggest video game magazine companies are now one

  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Edge was the first part of games media to realise that there was a huge crossover between trade magazine interest (recruitment ads and general development articles) and consumer interest (news/reviews etc). You can see it on forums, games enthusiasts are much more interested in the trade side of things, and the day-to-day business of various large companies and publishers, than consumers of other media types.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @Cheeky-Girl-Gamer
    I still prefer the feel of print, but I don't buy anywhere near as many as I used to. Even then, the heavy discounts on subs by desperate publishers are probably why I still buy them- I doubt I'd pay 5 in the newsagents for them any more.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @ghostgate2001
    Super Play was fantastic, my brother and I would sit there and look at all the games we'd never get to play too!

    SNES games were expensive, and of the Japanese games from less common genres (at the time and in the UK) that came out over here, there are plenty that I love that I never would have even tried without Super Play raving about them. Secret of Mana and Legend of the Mystical Ninja spring to mind.

    The first Future mag I bought on a regular basis was Total! though- the reviews were long and I remember thinking it was much more informative than the official Nintendo mag of the time.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @Kasper_Finknottle
    Yeah, the No Mans Sky one was good too.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @matthewhaycock
    Thanks for that, much appreciated!
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @jabberwocky
    Few magazines focus on news these days. It's mostly news analysis, features, previews, reviews etc. I read EG for news most days, but the features in print mags tend to be longer and more in-depth.

    Even tablet mags aren't doing that well- encouraging advertisers to pay for space in either print or tablet editions is a tough ask these days. The magazine I work on has both a print and a tablet edition, and while the print edition's ad revenue is much less than it was a decade ago, the tablet yield is still a pittance in comparison.

    Did Edge stop doing their bespoke tablet edition with the animation etc? It was really nice, but I remember thinking at the time that they couldn't keep that up for long unless the tablet ad revenue picked up.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    Games TM is great, I've got a subscription to that. I'd rather keep that than Edge, which I cancelled years ago.

    Hopefully if they do close the magazine they'll actually let subscribers know rather than just swap the sub over to another one automatically, like some publishers have done with closed titles in the past.
    Reply +3
  • We played Zelda: Breath of the Wild four times and here's what we discovered

  • redcrayon 21/06/2016

    @-TheDarkSide-
    I always used to leave Zelda games/rpgs at the entrance to the next dungeon or town, to give me a fighting chance of jumping back in if I left the game for months.

    That was until I ended up saving at the entrance after having completed every quest relating to a town (one of the Star Ocean games, I think), returning months later to then spend ages interrogating everyone and wondering where the hell the questline was. These days I keep a notebook in the drawer by the telly, with pages of cryptic hints like 'try x next, speak to man in hat'. My wife was clearing it out one day and said it reads like a disjointed journal written by some half-crazed adventurer. She's probably right.
    Reply +4
  • The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the most ambitious Nintendo game in years

  • redcrayon 15/06/2016

    I love the idea that adventurers should wear warm clothes when heading to the mountains, after years of watching characters stroll into the snow wearing little more than sandals, a shirt and the same gear they investigate volcanos with. Reply +10
  • Homefront, Fire Emblem fail to dislodge Doom and Uncharted 4

  • redcrayon 23/05/2016

    Not really sure how Fire Emblem 'failed to dislodge' the AAA shooters from the top of the IK charts, I wouldn't have put it as a required objective for a niche strategy rpg on a portable in the UK to sit any higher than it did. Still, good to see Valkyria Chronicles up there too. Reply +4
  • What exactly is going on with the different versions of Fire Emblem Fates?

  • redcrayon 19/05/2016

    @pogomeister j
    That's correct: if you buy Birthright, then the Conquest and Revelations campaigns are effectively DLC expansions, and vice versa.
    Reply +1
  • EA dev chief initially rejected World War 1 setting for Battlefield

  • redcrayon 18/05/2016

    @goggyturk
    Exactly. I know its easy to cast executives as being corporate drones who just want to follow the money, but 'that doesn't sound like fun to play' seems a pretty reasonable concern for a games exec to me, and taking the time to play the demo and change his mind seems pretty fair too.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 18/05/2016

    @ramshot
    WWI wasn't all trench warfare, although that's understandably the lasting image of the western front to those of us in western Europe and the US (due to media coverage, Blackadder, the accounts of our soldiers who took part and the resonance of armistice day etc). The advances and retreats of the eastern front that defined the battles between central and eastern european factions raged back and forth over hundreds of miles.

    I'm not surprised that any westerner thinks it was all static trench warfare and thus not exactly suitable for run-and-gun and vehicle play as that's pretty much the general assumption.

    It's easy to see how complex conflicts become simplified to a single image over time though- you can see it with World War 2 often being cast as a battle of good vs evil or freedom vs dictatorship as it makes a simpler story than the various economic, political and territorial struggles that were also part of it. Same goes for the Crusades, where hundreds of years of warfare with huge periods of relative peace, dozens of factions and different campaigns with different goals all get summed up in a few sentences of narrative about Jerusalem and an image of western knights vs saracens.

    Makes me wonder how the last 25 years of western action in the middle east will eventually be all thrown together and branded as a single entity, no matter the different goals and objectives of actions taken years and hundreds of miles apart.
    Reply +8
  • Homefront: The Revolution review

  • redcrayon 17/05/2016

    @Sheetbike
    The only thing that 'Nork' seems to discriminate against is the invading force, and correct English due to the military need to shorten a four-syllable faction title when under fire. That shorthand then presumably catches on. If it was an invading Uzbekistan army, (for the sake of a four-syllable, non-western country name), I'm not sure that the defenders shortening it to ''the Uzbeks' would be racist and a racial slur rather than a shorthand of convenience. Two factions being of different ethnicities and bitter enemies doesn't automatically make catchy battlefield shorthand for a long country name racist. Feels like you're reaching a bit here when there's plenty of other crap to call the game out on. If anything, I think 'Nork' is fairly polite for a term to describe a comically evil totalitarian invading force. Pretty sure there were also much nastier names for invading German forces in WWII than the relatively benign 'the gerries '.

    I'm also concerned at the lack of gags regarding the use of Aus/UK slang for breasts. Come on EG, what are we paying you for? Oh... Sorry. Carry on ;-)
    Reply +13
  • Combat fatigues: How Uncharted is a walking simulator in action game's clothing

  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @SpaceInvader2
    I think that the opening of 'isn't this adventure story setup of white bloke killing baddies and spunky journo girl generic' is only to offer a counterpoint to the next thousand words of praise for its pacing.

    If he had mentioned Drake's race in isolation as a 'white guy= bad' thing I'd be criticising
    the article too, but he didn't- it's been pulled out of context when what he was talking about was the generic airport thriller (a genre of books almost exclusively featuring white bloke adventurers) feel of the characters. To be honest, even then I think Naughty Dog did it on purpose- if you want to make a successful pulp adventure series, I can hardly blame them for borrowing the template those stories have followed and sold tens of millions of books and cinema tickets on the back of for nearly a century.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @Sedoi
    The article doesn't claim Uncharted is 'bland', 'just because' the protagonist is white and male, you've just read that into it. The article claims that Uncharted's setup, and it mentions lots of things other than Drake's skin colour and gender like killing baddies, Elena's personality, their attractiveness etc, is generic. Which is true for adventure stories, as I pointed out- I must read at least a dozen of those kinda pulp thrillers a year when travelling and characters like Drake and Elena are pretty much the default. You saying 'it really doesn't matter' hardly rebuts my point.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @Sedoi
    If you'd have read the article past the first paragraph, you'd realise that's not the point it's making at all.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @NeoTechni
    I'm struggling to see the racism in the article. It calls Uncharted's setup generic for having Drake and Elena as a globetrotting handsome/pretty white couple, but in the context of adventure/action games/films/books/stories that is about as genre-common or 'generic' a setup as you can get. Seriously, go into a bookshop and look at the thrillers/action/adventure books, you'll see the shelves full of Cussler, Ludlum, Child and loads more, virtually all of which feature a leading white bloke who is an experienced traveller and familiar with combat, usually paired with a smart, slightly younger white woman with a more academic skillset.

    It's not racism to acknowledge that setup has been the template for characters in action/adventure/genre fiction since Penguin made paperbacks popular. It's not just about how they look, it's a popular storytelling template because it gives a complete adventurous skillset of street smarts, adapting to exotic locations easily, existing contacts, investigative, academic and combat ability, plus a certain amount of vulnerability and romantic tension, all with just two characters.

    Like all tropes/cliches, it doesn't mean it's a bad thing on an individual basis, it's just visable when looking at the template for adventure stories as a whole. A bit like with games, where there's absolutely nothing wrong with having a white bloke with brown hair and a gun as your lead character, but when everyone did it, it started to look a bit silly.
    Reply +6
  • Ace Attorney 6 set for a western release this September

  • redcrayon 12/05/2016

    @Binba442
    Civ 6 got a pun and Ace Attorney didn't? ;-;
    Wright Anything.
    Reply 0
  • DICE's Great War: classes, horses and more in Battlefield 1

  • redcrayon 11/05/2016

    @Doomspoon
    Yeah. I've often said the same when people bring up wanting to play FPS games set in the US civil war, war of independence or Napoleon's campaigns. In those settings it's all about an officer getting a greater amount of rounds per minute pointing in the right direction in the right formation, and the interplay between artillery/cavalry threats restricting formation choices. Seeing as each individual is only contributing a handful of shots per minute, for the tiny amount of time they are engaged before being routed/victorious, it lends itself better to strategy than to being about individuals greatly affecting things through working in very small numbers of heavily-equipped personnel. Nobody cares what a one-man-army sergeant redcoat is when he physically can only fire half a dozen musket balls a minute, and isn't allowed to run around the battlefield owning noobs on his own. Unless his surname is Sharpe, of course. :D
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 11/05/2016

    @spekkeh
    The trenches and tragedies of the Western Front have become the iconic view of WW1 due to their relevance to the countries putting out most of the media concerning it (Western Europe) and the more understandable nature of that location and the factions involved to interested people in the US. However, if Battlefield 1 raises awareness that millions of people dying on the Western Front wasn't the only theatre of that war that deserves interest, then it might achieve something yet. Plenty of huge battles and campaigns by other factions that are only really noted by historians were highly mobile, but western interest focuses on the western front as the image of it is what had the most resonance for us. The western front is only named such because the Eastern front also existed, and the central powers there fought back and forth over hundreds of miles.

    Winston Churchill called it the unknown war:
    In the west, the armies were too big for the land; in the east, the land was too big for the armies
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 11/05/2016

    Is it going to have players running around with machine guns with huge clips for the sake of keeping the run-and-gun play the same, or be based around the actual period rifles? The interview sounds like they are allowing players to run around with machine guns, which kind of destroys the setting for me. If you're going to let people run around wielding light machine guns in 1915, it's a WWII game in a WWI skin.

    Aleks Grondal: We are going for authenticity to some degree, but there's always fun over authenticity. That's always what we do with Battlefield games. We do take creative liberties.
    Isn't it a bit silly when you're selling the game on a setting that hasn't been explored much, but using 'creative liberties' to feature the exact same types of weapons that have been explored to death in hundreds of games set decades later for the sake of player familiarity with them? Fun is a great reason to do something, but I wouldn't be entirely sold on a Crimean game where the firing line on both sides are all equipped with machine guns either. Why not try to make period gunplay tactical and fun, as I suspect it's less about fun and more about being utterly terrified that online shooter fans don't want anything too different from modern weapons. Which seems at odds with the creativity evident in adding biplanes and cavalry charges.
    Reply +3
  • Persona 5 gets a Japanese release date and new trailer

  • redcrayon 06/05/2016

    @DasManiac
    I've never understood why Japanese developers refuse to translate their games during development. Pretty much every Western game releases with multiple languages. Japan needs to do the same. Also it'd be nice if Atlus would stop being biased towards Sony and start releasing their games on PC and Nintendo consoles.
    Altus releases loads of games on Nintendo consoles, they just mainly happen to be on portables, like SMTIV, Etrian Odyssey etc. They put shedloada out on DS too. The problem (for the few of us that like their output on Nintendo devices) is the constant change in EU publisher combined with region lock.

    They don't make that many home console games, but I suppose that Fire Emblem / SMT game is on WiiU.

    'Bias' sounds both petty and the least likely reason for platform decisions that have to be justifiable to senior management. Putting their games on Sony home consoles and Nintendo portables when those are the market leaders both at home and worldwide in the console/portable spaces doesn't seem like such a bad idea to me.
    Reply +1
  • Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War 3 announced

  • redcrayon 03/05/2016

    @Rogueywon
    Geek hat on, but Imperial Knights aren't a new addition to 40k lore, they were around in the small-scale tabletop wargame, Epic, since 1990, and then again a few years later in Titan Legions. They are new to the current edition of 40k itself though, the huge new model kit is really nice.
    Reply +3
  • Space Hulk: Deathwing actually looks really good

  • redcrayon 30/04/2016

    @EG
    While I'm sure many of those interested in the story will know what a marine librarian is in the context of Warhammer 40k and you're just repeating from the press release, it might have been worth a quick search and sticking a simplified job description of 'psychic officer' in for people unfamiliar with the somewhat labyrinthine lore, who are now wondering why the hulking Deathwing Terminators have dragged the curator of the local book depository along! :D
    Reply +1
  • Sony's PSN is making more money than all of Nintendo

  • redcrayon 28/04/2016

    In this thread, 'PSN alone makes more money than Nintendo's 200m profits' is interpreted as 'Nintendo didn't make any money at all'.

    It's entirely possible for the WiiU to have tanked and Nintendo to still be making cash off the back of other stuff instead. Not a great look for them long-term, but hardly indicative of their imminent collapse if they are still posting profits with a failed home console that has sod-all third party support and a meagre release schedule.

    I hope NX doesn't have a 40 sub for online play.
    Reply +17
  • Dark Souls dev begins work on new IP - report

  • redcrayon 28/04/2016

    Part of the issue with the games industry at the moment is that when a developer stops making a swords-and-sorcery fantasy series, everyone says make a Sci-fi/space fantasy (or vice-versa) instead, as if they are the only options.

    I love sci-fi and fantasy with all my heart but there's so much more games could cover than magic swords, ancient races, dragons, space marines, robots, spaceships, hacking computers and the living dead. For a global creative industry with projects largely aimed at adults these days there is a reluctance to try anything other than the 'familiar fantastical'.

    I hope talented devs like From find a path that hasn't been well-trod before, or at least a new angle on an old one. Best of luck to them, the choice to let a successful series rest rather than milk it to death is a brave one and one worth applauding.
    Reply +3
  • Telltale's The Walking Dead season three sees return of popular character

  • redcrayon 27/04/2016

    @kevinkdobdobson
    A choice doesn't always have to make a difference long term to have value to a story, sometimes a choice can personalise just a scene or just an arc rather than echo through every arc going forwards. If Clem has parted ways with anyone she might have ended Season 2 with (and let's face it, groups of survivors have trouble staying together and even staying alive), that seems fair enough. Why hold Telltale to continually have to account for an ever-widening pool of choices when a timeskip deals with it nicely? They can easily have your previous choices and surviving acquaintances acknowledged in a minor scene rather than have to waste time writing and working in stuff to do for characters that are either dead or missing in at least half of the player's stories anyway, and so can't have major roles.

    Of the two different adults Clem ended up accompanying in my playthroughs, they were both damaged enough people that I really wouldnt be surprised if they parted ways. A couple of scenes at best as a nod to past escapades would be enough for me, rather than being shackled to characters whose arcs and defining moment for their value and influence on Clem are largely complete after the finale of S2.
    Reply +8
  • The Gears of War 4 season pass costs 40

  • redcrayon 26/04/2016

    @super_monty
    While I remember reading something about that, PS2 games were also 40 15 years ago. I don't think the entire industry has been price-fixing for the entire last quarter-century. The price of console games has barely changed but the complexity and development costs of them has increased many times over.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 26/04/2016

    @PlugMonkey
    Agree entirely. For my 'shooters' 25 years ago, I remember paying 40 each for Probotector and Gradius. Both were single player only, had under 10 stages and could be completed in about 25 minutes, after spending the first few hours of owning the games playing the first three stages over and over again due to high difficulty and limited lives.

    40 gets us a lot of computer game today, there were very few games in the early 90s that I could pour hundreds of hours into the way the the best online and roleplaying games do today. I think part of the broad distaste with the pricing of DLC is that the main games are often fine in terms of raw content, but the add-on DLC ends up costing the same amount again when it clearly isnt double the amount of 'game'. If 40 buys you the single player campaign and a functional multiplayer with a load of random maps, I'm not sure how just a few permanent maps and skins is also 40. Maybe if, after playing a map, you could 'lock' it to your profile for an extra couple of quid each or something? Otherwise I'd always choose to pick up another game instead.
    Reply +6
  • Blizzard has nerfed Hearthstone's "sorry" emote

  • redcrayon 26/04/2016

    @woof
    There's loads of great online communities, it's just that the bad are more memorable as someone going out of their way to insult a stranger sticks in the craw more than someone saying 'thanks for a great game'. The only online game I play is Monster Hunter. Maybe it's that it's co-op or that k/d (unless you repeatedly use up all of the team's three revivals) and rankings based on performance in each match don't matter, but the community is great.

    Besides, people downvoting your comment doesn't prove your point about people online being arseholes. Sometimes it just means several people disagree with what you said or the sulky, passive-aggressive way you said it.
    Reply -1
  • redcrayon 26/04/2016

    I really don't see how players can't use 'well played', 'wow', 'oops' or 'thanks' sarcastically either.

    When I used to play at tournaments for tabletop games, 'thanks for that' and 'cheers, that was... Educational' and similar stuff were often lighthearted sarcastic remarks meaning 'I've just been annihilated in under ten minutes of a 90 minute game and now have to wait' or 'it wasn't much fun'. Not always though.

    Maybe it's just British humour where we just assume everyone is being sarcastic unless obviously earnest!
    Reply +1
  • Amazon marks GTA5, FIFA 16, Minecraft and more as "exclusively for Prime members"

  • redcrayon 22/04/2016

    @Rayza
    Not everyone values fast delivery as being worth 80 a year. I'm usually happy to play games weeks after they come out, or I'll buy something midweek to play the following weekend, as the free delivery option within 3-4 days is cheaper than both Prime and shopping on the high street. Paying 80 for the privilege of shopping there just for same day delivery on spontaneous purchases seems silly to me- if I bought enough like that to make it worth it, I'd expect my account to be valuable enough to not have to pay an extra fee. I'd rather plan my purchases more carefully than pay a subscription fee.
    Reply +4
  • One machine to rule them all: the triumph of Xbox 360

  • redcrayon 22/04/2016

    The 360 was a great achievement for MS, and it would have been more interesting to trace its heritage through today's games, but lines like
    the year in which its investment in third-party exclusives paid off with a software lineup never beaten before or since.

    And
    The Xbox 360 in 2007 was the zenith of the pure-games console, a high that will never come again
    read like pure hyperbole, especially when you have to bulk out your list with Lost Planet. The writer doesn't seem to be able to separate personal enthusiasm from a critical eye. Great year? Certainly. Industry best ever? Debatable. Never to be repeated? Come on.

    If the 360 was your first console (judging by the kids on the multiplayer games, it must have been for quite a few), AAA games the only thing that mattered to you, western shooters the main thing you play and you had little interest in Japanese games that pretty much defined the previous 20 years on consoles then fair enough, 2007 on 360 was great. Personally I had several better years on several other 'pure' games consoles over the previous couple of decades. The 360 lineup in 2007 wasn't for everyone (neither was the PS3/Wii), to each their own.

    I had a great time with the Gears games, Mass Effect and Dead Rising, when it wasn't in for repair. If you're going to aim for 'one machine to rule them all' for a decade, don't skimp on the build quality, and don't lose focus on the existing base of people who bought in for games once the new hotness arrives.

    But for ten years Xbox 360 was the industry default
    How on earth was it the industry default machine in 2015? That's quite a claim.

    After almost eleven years, the green ring of light is going dark, on an industry that's changed out of all recognition: that it kept up for so long and delivered so much is an unprecedented achievement.
    This is also ridiculous when MS abandoned focus on 'delivering' with it half a decade ago. A machine still being built doesn't mean it's still 'keeping up', and it's hardly an unprecedented or amazing achievement for popular consoles to still be being built 11 years after launch, and several after the primary markets start to lose interest, when they are selling in other markets. I think the PS2 and GB were still being made at that point too, and DS carts only stopped being produced a couple of weeks ago. Considering that games are still being made for PS3 in Japan following a slow PS4 launch I suspect that the PS3 will far outlast the 360 in terms of both hardware and software too.

    The article is a great rundown of the 360s lifespan, and it absolutely did change the console landscape's focus to what it recognisably is today, but the silly unrestrained hyperbole (that is usually the realm of single-format mags) lets it down.
    Reply +1
  • Dark Souls board game raises $71k Kickstarter goal in three minutes

  • redcrayon 20/04/2016

    Those miniatures look great. Reply +2
  • The end of Nintendo's weird GamePad era

  • redcrayon 13/04/2016

    @vmagic
    Plenty of us 30somethings also end up rediscovering Nintendo when we have kids, want to introduce them to the hobby and realise that the other consoles focus heavily on 15+ and 18+ rated games, alienating younger gamers. No wonder they look to mobile and minecraft.

    I do see your point in that Nintendo's utter disinterest in courting western AAA third parties seems pretty suicidal for a console manufacturer at this point, but the narrow focus on violent action games that only adults can play is another form of walled garden too.
    Reply +11
  • Dark Souls 3 review

  • redcrayon 12/04/2016

    @Tecstar
    I'm sure there's no way that your favourite genres could be rounded up in such a dismissive way ether, is there.
    Reply +3
  • Digital Foundry: Hands-on with Star Fox Zero

  • redcrayon 10/04/2016

    @dogmanstaruk
    To be fair, if you're objecting to gimmicks in Starfox games, Lylat Wars came bundled with an obligatory purchase of a huge rumble pak, that slotted into the bottom of the not-exactly-standard N64 controller.

    Not that it was mandatory to use or anything, just thought it worth a mention :-)
    Reply +3
  • Zelda's browser-based fan remake shut down by Nintendo

  • redcrayon 08/04/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    And you mate
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 08/04/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Heh, I went from freelance graphics to working on a publishing art desk a long time ago, but thanks for the pep talk, I miss my freelance days (mainly the hours) but don't miss dealing with late payments from companies and them taking the piss on copyright. :-)

    I still do a bit of freelance work on the side though, it's good that I enjoy my work and a bit of extra cash is always a bonus!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 08/04/2016

    At the time I was working as part of an designer/photographer team. While my colleague, an amazing photographer, was taking test shots and bracketing the lighting, he looked at me directing the parade of people in and out of the shoot that we needed that day and said 'just remember, I'm the bloody monkey!' :D

    I commission a lot of freelance photography and illustration, and addressing usage and copyright is something I put in the contract every time. It's amazing how many people just don't want to address it until it's a problem, especially when briefing people on short notice. Dealing with it afterwards is such a pain in the arse considering how many forms of media commissioned art might end up being reused in, that these days I just pay a higher initial fee to allow us to reuse artwork as long as it's credited. Ages ago I took a job as the art editor of a magazine and was horrified to find that their picture library, from which they reused stuff all the time, had no notes on copyright at all, or records of it in the art briefs. After dealing with several phone calls a week from freelances quite rightly objecting to this and asking for reuse fees, I eventually just had the entire old library marked as ' reuse fees apply' and made sure use of all commissioned and archived art went through me. The general idea from management seemed to be that if people complained we paid up and never used them again. I found it disgusting as someone who had been a freelance beforehand.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 08/04/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Yeah, I remember that- the case revolved around the idea that while the monkey was the 'originator' of the work under copyright law by pressing the button, the photographer's argument was that he had put in days of work in setting up the shoot. Interesting case, to be sure.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 08/04/2016

    @WilhelmvonOrmstein
    Don't ever try to make a living from creative work either, or try to find work in a legal department. A 'homage' to something isn't copying the whole damn thing. I'm not an automaton, I just think directly copying something and sticking it on the internet isn't automatically a great idea without adding your own spin on it.

    I'm amused at you bizarrely comparing it to criminal justice with consequences for people's freedom though. It's almost as if my thoughts on a minor common/civil law matter surrounding creative work might differ slightly from my thoughts regarding mitigating circumstances in criminal justice. But sure, I'm a faceless robot with no regard for the individual, keep telling yourself that if it makes you feel better. Personally I'm arguing from the side of an individual who has had to deal with people ripping off his work in the past, which is why I don't think it's a good idea, if you're talented enough to make games, to make someone else's.

    Large companies aren't wrong for employing people to defend their copyright and brands when protecting the value of those brands is what employs thousands of other people, and I don't think legal departments are wrong for wanting to stick to a clear response rather than debate what is and isn't allowed every single time either.

    Look at any of those gaming tee-shirt companies- they all sell clothing that is made by fans of popular franchises and that wouldn't sell if those franchises didn't exist, the difference is they add just enough of a unique spin on iconic imagery so that the homage is clear but it's a new creative work.

    You say 'they need to let this one go!', I say 'it wouldn't take much to remove any objection Nintendo could make', which is exactly what they are going to do and actually is a far stronger position for the dev going forward rather than a nebulous agreement with the copyright holder that could collapse at any time. What you're suggesting is an agreement that offers no protection long-term for the work- a company that turns a blind eye one day may feel very differently later on, it's still early days with media law online.

    I appreciate that you think I'm being unreasonable. I think distributing straight-up copies of work on the Internet is unreasonable too.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 07/04/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Agree on various gaming influences in 3D Dot Game Heroes (I particularly like the blacksmith nod to Megaman: "get your weapons ready!").

    However, the structure and dungeon design clearly borrow much more from LoZ than JRPGs IMO. Everything from the health system to the weapons, the dungeons to the puzzle solutions of bomb wall/move block/light torch is far closer to Zelda than any other game I can think of.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 07/04/2016

    @WilhelmvonOrmstein
    You're objecting to a 'lazy bureaucracy' that exists to offer a small measure of protection to creatives to retain control over distribution and be credited for their work, in the face of both modern technology that allows easy replication and common law that is still trying to understand the Internet.

    It exists to protect small creative businesses as well as large ones, and the devs were clearly aware of that. I think a company the size of Nintendo probably deals with a dozen infringements a day of it's various copyright, trademarks etc all over the world. I don't blame their legal dept. for having a blanket policy on protecting the use of their IP worldwide, no matter how well-intentioned the infringement, when those IP are the most valuable thing they have.

    As for 'why defend it?', it's precisely because these things work both ways. I work as a creative and keeping hold of the automatic copyright any of us have when creating original content is important to me. By all means be inspired by something, just don't copy it brick-by-brick and expect the originator to be cool with it, which to be fair the devs said that they knew the risk. It wouldn't have taken much in the way of clear tweaks for it to be protected as a deriviative work, which would have been the sensible option in the first place, rather than hoping a large company makes an exception to the policy it probably has to apply all the time.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 07/04/2016

    @nooneinparticular
    I don't think it would take much change to count as a deriviative work, either.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 07/04/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    When I think of Zelda 'homage', I think more along the lines of 3D Dot Game Heroes, not a straight up copy of the art assets and level design. That's not a homage heavily influenced by something, it's a straight-up copy. Good response from the dev though.
    Reply +12