redcrayon Comments

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  • Watch over an hour of Xenoblade Chronicles X gameplay

  • redcrayon 25/04/2015

    I feel lucky to have grown up playing games on 8-bit computers. Modern computer games invariably look spectacular to me regardless of whether they are on a WiiU or a playstation or an ipad. Reply +5
  • Xbox sales decreased 20 per cent year-over-year in Q1

  • redcrayon 24/04/2015

    I'm amazed at the commenters who can't view a console as anything other than a raging success or a total failure. I realise pithy comments don't allow for nuance, but still. Over the last thirty years there have been plenty of consoles that wished they had the sales of the XBO.

    Is it disappointing for MS after the 360 spent years out in front of the PS3 in the early half of last gen? Sure.

    I do think it's a good thing that MS seem to have realised that the thing people buy 300 games consoles and online subs for is, er, games and not American football and facebook. It bodes well for next time around for all console manufacturers.
    Reply +10
  • Total War: Warhammer the first title in a trilogy

  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    @Achtung_Englander
    Odds of warhammer eclipsing Total War for mass appeal are slim-to-none. There's room for both and a crossover of fanbases., plus it's not like they don't have multiple teams considering that they are working on mobile Total War games too.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    @Kasjer
    The ideas for 40k's Imperium isn't based 'heavily' on Dune, although the dark, feudal approach to a galactic empire was obviously a touchpoint on release. The concept of psychic navigators is a very small part of it, but even then in Dune they 'fold space' to teleport the entirely human armies of the great Houses that hate each other around. Whereas in 40k most long-distance travel requires a navigator to guide the ship through 'the warp', which is filled with predatory deamons and aliens desperate to get into the ships full of precious human souls. Similar initial starting point but hardly a copy just because the guy at the top is an Emperor.

    The Imperium has also taken references from a hundred other fictional and historical sources. Historical ones include the Inquisition, the Crusades, The Black Death, the British Empire (Preatorians), the Catholic Church (the ecclesiarchy, preachers, cathedrals and their architecture) Russian WWII infantry (Valhalla), Atilla the Hun (Rough Riders) various Greek names (Ultramarines) Templars (Dark Angels) etc etc. Fictional ones included Starship Troopers, The Forever War, Aliens, pretty much any space military fiction prior to 1987. The Even the Horus Heresy (where the marines split into two factions as the Emperor's favourite genetically-engineered son leads half of his 'angels' in rebellion) had various religious touchpoints too. All the most batshit insane stuff in Dune doesn't come close to some of the Adeptus Mechanicus, or the relentlessly dark sacrifices of endless hordes of psykers to keep the corpse-emperor alive and holding back chaos.

    It's a huge hotchpotch of (often poorly written but sometimes great) stuff comprising hundreds of books written by dozens of writers worth of it's own lore over three decades, saying that The Imperium's background ideas heavily come from one source just doesn't work when it's put it's own twist on so many references. It's also come up with a lot of widely-imitated fresh ideas, as well as touched on endless references in order to parody hundreds of individual sources/cultures as their own factions/worlds/armies to fill out the galaxy, and sell new kits every year. I'd say Warhammer is a much closer fit for your argument, as it took decades for GW to find an identity for it's own High Elves, Orcs, Goblins, Trolls, Treemen, Halflings, Wood Elves and Dwarves that isn't just LOTR and D&D. Those factions, along with Bretonnia, have much clearer sources than the teeming, stinking mass of humanity that comprises The Imperium, I reckon.
    Reply +2
  • Everybody's Gone to the Rapture and the particular joy of the British apocalypse

  • redcrayon 22/04/2015

    No mention of The Kraken Wakes? Wyndham's best quasi-apocalyptic tale in my book, and essential reading for X-com: Terror from the Deep fans. Or just fans of sci-fi in general. It's a shame it has never been filmed the way Triffids has multiple times, but it would require something more of an effects budget than several walking plant suits and a flamethrower!

    It also encompasses the 'cosy catastrophe', as a pair of lovely middle-class journalists enjoy a gentle existence as radio operators while the sea level rises, the survivors generally behave themselves, aliens attack etc.

    Great article though, more like that please.
    Reply +10
  • Probing the latest Mass Effect 4 leak

  • redcrayon 21/04/2015

    What is it with fantasy/sci-fi and naming their ancient races? It just seems really unimaginative that they are always referred to as something like forerunners/precursors/old ones/ancients/remnants etc. Sure, it's evocative of their role in the story, but the 'they didn't leave their names but they did leave enough weird weaponry to level the universe' idea is such a cliche. A whole universe of possibility and we're still a space marine on the trail of a super-weapon. Same goes for Bioware and their current trend of 'player is both space/chainmail jesus and the coolest commander with the most resources and most friends ever'. Why the ego stroking? I'd love to see an rpg that dealt with the smaller issues of advanced sci-fi/space exploration without glossing over it due to having to see it down the scope of a rifle and against a background of saving humanity yet again, but I suppose multiplayer deathmatch requires it.

    It's not just computer games, authors seem to struggle with it too. I suppose it's an easy way to include space magic macguffins without having to commit to coherent motivations for antagonists beyond 'when I get this I can control the galaxy bwah hah hah!'.

    Still, much as the ME3 ending sucked, I'm really looking forward to this. The series had too many great moments in it's 100 hour running time to write off for one red/green/blue pill.
    Reply +1
  • Rich Stanton on: Skill and the random element

  • redcrayon 19/04/2015

    @gregsheppard
    Agree on randomness in multiplayer not hobbling one side from the start, and that AW is fantastic. I do prefer FE though, as I like a bit of a random element in strategy games, and the hit percentages rather than swapping-off hit points in AW supplies that. I do like the AW/Panzer Tactics etc mechanic that a units HP and attack strength are linked though, rather than fantasy games where a unit hits at full strength even when it only has 1 HP left. TBH I love all kinds of strategy games and have spent hundreds of hours with both :-)

    I preferred AW before Dual Strike though, where multiple commander powers in a row ruined the core, precise balance between units for me. Particularly when Eagle could spam two turns in a row, that kind of thing. It's not random, but it did put a gimmick out in front of the true beauty of AW which is the careful balance of all of the unit choices, their cost, counters etc. Dark Conflict wasn't too bad though.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 19/04/2015

    @StixxUK
    That reminds me of Mario Kart too. A good player will still beat a poor one 95% of the time, and the random element helps keep it interesting when there is a vast disparity in skill, like when playing at home if you have young children.

    But I think players objected in MKWii where the skill difference online was minimal, the time between first and last place only a matter of seconds, but the items given out the same in their ability to shake up the game as if the player in sixth was a lap behind rather than three seconds. MK8 feels a bit better in that regard. Having said that, MK is a game where a good player recognises that just being the fastest isn't the only strategy- item availability is predictable in their power level, so there is an advantage in being back in third/fourth. There is also a kind of balance in that the player in first wasn't getting murdered by everyone in the pack with triple shells, and also was the least likely to get hit by stars and bullet bills as the players at the back move up. They view it that they are miles ahead because they are the best, but really they might just be miles ahead because their threats are only coming from one direction.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    @KanePaws
    All fair points.

    Personally I prefer the tension of moving on without a character now and then rather than worrying about missing a few lines of dialogue or the sentence regarding what they do afterwards in the end credits.

    Although one of the FE games (Shadow Dragon? Can't remember) offers you new units only available if other ones have been slaughtered to the point that you are desperately in need of reinforcements. Truly a nightmare for the player who wants to see everything! :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    @Bernkastel
    Fair enough, I do appreciate that in an SRPG, you get more attached to characters than to unnamed units in other strategy games, same goes for xcom.

    My favourite FE campaign was when one of my best units died halfway through, and I decided not to restart the mission. He was a bit of a crutch, and it forced me to step up my fame for the next few levels as the other cgaracters couldn't just let him absorb damage any more. I suppose that's one of the addictive things about it, you have control of an army, soldiers die in war, but you have the option to replay the mission in exactly the same way and change the fate of any unit. Just being able to do that makes the choice to continue on without them hard sometimes.

    I do tend to let annoying child and animal characters die though, especially if their dialogue is particularly awful.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 18/04/2015

    With Monster Hunter players seem to be on a constant hunt for a perfect gear set, particularly mining for the right talisman when there are a near-infinite amount of potential variations, or spending hours grinding for relic weapons that are incrementally better than each other and have the right amount of slots needed for their 'perfect' skill set.

    The trick is not to build sets around kit you don't have. I've always just improvised around what I've been given, and seen the randomness as part of the fun.

    With Fire Emblem, players often dislike that enemies are capable of critical hits (3x damage) too. Again, this comes from the obsessive desire to keep everyone alive, a perfect save file in a strategy game about leading a fantasy army. When I play Total War, I don't worry when my elite crusader units get annihilated by a series of disasters, and so it doesn't bother me when Timmy the 12-year-old battlemage gets stabbed in the face by a plucky enemy swordsman. More xp for the luckier combatants :D Maybe it's just the desire for 'perfection' that puts players at odds with a RNG.

    Seeing as FE is already a game where you can see enemy movement and attack ranges, and count on them moving solely to inflict the most damage each turn, I don't think a player is much of a strategist if they can only continue when the enemy is entirely predictable and never has any good luck, while remains at the mercy of the pmayer's good fortune and godlike vision.
    Reply +6
  • Battlefield: Hardline trumps Bloodborne in March US retail sales

  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    Fair enough, i think we're stumbling towards a grudging agreement so I'll leave it there :-)
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @mega-gazz
    Only 10% of PS3 owners bought TLOU and that was just as critically acclaimed, and featured guns and zombies, probably two of the most popular elements in games in recent years.

    Just because a game doesn't have as broad, mass market appeal as Battlefield, GTA or CoD doesn't mean it's awful. Do you seriously take sales figures as an indication of quality despite almost unanimous acclaim elsewhere?

    An awful lot of the best games of all time were bought by well under 10% of the system owners. Expecting everyone, not just forumites but also the vastly greater number of who only buy two games a year, to turn out for a niche Japanese action game that released the week after guns, cops n'robbers is just silly. As is you trying to paint a niche series greatly increasingly in popularity as some kind of sales fail.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    It depends on your starting point.

    If we accept that all player bases are equal in skill, no matter the franchise or niche, then sure, I would agree, percentage of them beating mid-point bosses is interesting.

    However, Bloodborne still only has a small number of people playing compared to a larger western ego-stroking shooter/rpg published by EA and sold to a wider audience. If Bloodborne's player base consists of more dedicated players, including a large chunk of the fanbase of the Souls games, then any comparison is meaningless. Surely we'd be better off looking at those gamers who we know have played both, and I think that, of those, the opinion of 'Bloodborne is easier' would be a less popular one.

    I mean, I wouldn't expect to compare the total of players who don't progress past high-rank bosses on Monster Hunter with those not progressing past mid-level bosses on CoD and expect to come up with any useful stats either, when you can't prove it's the same group of players or the same level of skill.

    All this aside, I agree with you that anyone can get into Bloodborne, I just don't think it has the same casual appeal as Bioware games, especially the more recent relatively streamlined ones. It's increased sales feels like it's more due to word of mouth about how awesome it is rather than that it's easy to get into.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @grassyknoll
    I don't think Bloodborne is impenetrable at all, but your logic of comparing players who have beaten first bosses is flawed.

    DA and ME have a long lead up to their first real bosses, allowing time to explore but also time for players to get bored and give up- you can't claim that just because a player hasn't progressed past a boss, it means that they reached it and couldn't defeat it due to it's difficulty. In Bioware's titles they could have wandered around for quite a while, and also the battle systems are far more forgiving, requiring less crucial timing.

    Bloodborne is much more claustrophobic and intense, which is a good thing for a game with horror elements. Bioware tends to make their games as welcoming as possible, hence the 'you are space/chainmail jesus' ego stroking.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 17/04/2015

    @mega-gazz
    Considering this was US sales, ranting at 'you PS4 owners' on Eurogamer seems a bit pointless.

    Mega western franchise with mass shootbang appeal, available on five platforms and for an extra week, outsells niche, critically acclaimed Japanese action game available on one platform in the US. Not really sure what your point is. Battlefield selling shitloads (despite selling less than previous entry due to being a spin-off), when it was the only multiplat shooter out that month, was inevitable, whereas Bloodborne's sales are a great indication of a cult game with a growing fanbase due to word of mouth. Not all games are created equal in sales potential.
    Reply +2
  • Gunstar Heroes, Streets of Rage 2 and Sonic 2 heading to 3DS

  • redcrayon 15/04/2015

    SoR2 is easily my favourite megadrive game, can't wait for this. Reply +1
  • Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate passes 1m shipped milestone in West

  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Fair points. I suppose my counter-point to that is that our discussion hinges on exactly how niche MH is outside of Japan. Your example of Dark Souls at least has the advantage of being a single-player, blood-soaked, dark-fantasy action rpg, which has a very healthy appeal to western gamers- it appeals to both rpg fans and fans of the character action games with their deep combat mechanics. I'm not sure a quirky, largely co-op, firmly-Japanese-in-style loot 'em up like MH has even the same appeal as Souls outside of Japan at the moment.

    I think MH4 is a landmark moment for the series in terms of western appeal though, it feels like the press have finally realised what it is, and multiplat feels ultimately inevitable, it's just a matter of when.

    I also think the sheer depth of systems and the focus on unrelenting enemies and player skill over xp and stat upgrades gives Souls and MH something in common that might well have helped MH over the last couple of years in terms of word-of-mouth from dedicated gamers, but that's another discussion!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Monster Hunter has been a niche interest in the west for a long time, having started as a Japanese curiosity and requiring a vibrant online community where friends can play together. It remains primarily targeted at a Japanese player base that's profitable enough to support it alone. Dragon's Dogma, at the moment, consists of a single game that was their most expensive ever project to develop, was tailor-made for and directly targeted at western rpg fans, and the pawn system mattered nowhere near as much in terms of friends playing and slaying together. No wonder they have taken a different amount of time to grow outside of Japan- DD was designed from scratch for overseas.

    The development and curation of each franchise has different factors in play, I don't see how they are comparable. Capcom have already said that they didn't want to split the playerbase, and I'm not sure that splitting it over 3DS/WiiU/PS3/PS4/PSV/XBO globally would really be worth the cost of both HD development and running costs for ongoing much smaller online communities.

    Sure, it would have sold more copies, but you've got to weigh that against vastly increased development costs, plus the loss of Nintendo shouldering the marketing costs, plus not including the fans who would have bought the 3DS version anyway. While i sympathise with gamers who want multiplat MH (I want to see it on other systems too as obviously the game can be beautiful) I'm just not convinced that there is enough interest for that to be viable. Yet. :D Let's hope it gets to the point where MH is so huge worldwide that a community on any popular platform becomes an inevitability,
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    @whatfruit
    Citation needed. Have you got a link?

    The deal for Monster Hunter on Nintendo platforms was that they help promote it overseas, I very much doubt large bags of cash were needed outside of that, both Capcom and Ninty profit from it. The idea that the fate of a franchise of such huge importance to Capcom would be decided by such a short-term factor as who had deeper pockets in 2012 rather than who was better placed to help them achieve growth on portables in the west seems a bit odd.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    It's not often a game gets its teeth into me the way monster hunter does, and MH4 is the best one so far.

    The combination of great (and free) online play, 100+ hours in single player even if you don't want to go online, tinkering with kit, not knowing what you'll find on an expedition. It's just a fantastic piece of work, with free DLC releasing monthly and even the guild quests via streetpass offering new surprises too. The content seems almost endless, I'm still finding new quests after nearly 200 hours. The community is great too, really friendly and helpful.

    It's an example of how to carefully move a series forward without abandoning everything that makes the original fun. It's also refreshing to find a series that is so generous with giving the players more stuff to do, rather than begging for a fiver for a few new quests or weapons.
    Reply +4
  • Titan Souls walkthrough and game guide

  • redcrayon 14/04/2015

    It isn't even out on PSN yet, wouldn't it have been better to wait until the weekend when readers have had a go and maybe got a bit stuck or something? Reply +1
  • Titan Souls review

  • redcrayon 13/04/2015

    @penhalion
    I grew up playing one-hit-kill games, everything from Contra/Probotector and Robotron to Metal Slug, Gradius, R-Type, Dizzy, Donkey-Kong, Pac-Man, Chuckie-Egg and dozens more. More recently, Super Meat Boy, Spelunky etc carry on that fine tradition. At no point did I feel your sense of 'unfairness' unless I felt the death wasn't my fault, that's a new one on me. I certainly didn't 'hate' the developer, otherwise I wouldn't have bought half a dozen Contra, Metal Slug, Dizzy, R-Type etc etc games. I was always looking forward to the next one and revelled in a new challenge.

    A game not having a life bar isn't a failure of game design as long as the player can see why they died, and it wasn't due to shit controls or enemies spawning off screen. Being constantly one hit away from death adds tension in a way that the sense of safety in having a lengthy health bar, a two-litre bottle of healing potion and save points every three metres never will. I always felt like every death means a little more of the pattern is revealed, a little more experience gained as a player, rather than extra hit points.

    These days it seems like some gamers are terrified of repeating even a few seconds of play. A seven-second sprint to a boss and infinite continues still pretty much guarantees progress through tenacity and seems pretty generous to me.
    Reply +10
  • Strategy RPG mash-up Project X Zone 2 headed West

  • redcrayon 13/04/2015

    I was disappointed to find there wasn't much in the way of strategy with the battles in the first one. Maps are very basic, and the entire appeal is on the cool real-time combos and characters rather than any kind of tactics. I appreciate people buy it for the fanservice, but for such a long game it really felt like a repetitive chore towards the end. Reply 0
  • Resident Evil Revelations 2 is coming to Vita this summer

  • redcrayon 12/04/2015

    @lukasheinzel1
    I don't think many Vita fans are expecting anything major out of E3, why would you think they are? I mean, I love my Vita but Sony was pretty blatant about stopping development of exclusives for it. Not even a full-on, exclusive set of AAA games could help the Vita at this point, Sony have done everything bar put out ads saying 'no more AAA games!' for the thing.

    I'm not maintaining any illusions of a resurrection for it, but personally the smaller downloadable stuff is all I need. Can't wait for Ys 8, Liege, Banner Saga, Space Hulk, Titan Souls, Cosmic Star Heroine, Drifter, Darkest Dungeon, Severed, Zodiac, Hyper Light Drifter, Dragon Fin Soup. If the release list keeps ticking over with stuff like that for another couple of years, I'll be more than happy with it.

    Exclusives matter for hardware sales, and that's a battle already lost a long time ago. Why you think Vita fans are still clinging to the idea that major announcements at a western games show are a) likely or b) would make the tiniest bit of difference to it's fate is a mystery to me.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 11/04/2015

    Gyroscopic aiming is great in Vita shooters. My favourite part of Uncharted GA, shame about all the QTEs. Reply +2
  • What made Super Mario 64 so special?

  • redcrayon 12/04/2015

    While I love SM64 and OOT, the N64 game I go back to the most is Lylat Wars. It still plays like a dream, the camera isn't an issue, and I can blast through it in an afternoon. Graphics (and the early 3D graphics in particular) can feel a little primitive, but good gameplay never ages. Reply +5
  • Skylanders-style Lego Dimensions features Batman, Gandalf, Back to the Future

  • redcrayon 09/04/2015

    @Mr-V
    Isn't that kinda the whole point of the lego games though? It's not like any of us are going to buy it and then be shocked to find it interacts with a vast range of (expensive) toys and DLC. It's a bit like complaining that a Disney DVD comes with a flier for a shitload of Frozen tat aimed at little girls. Licensed games and toys manufacturers have been sharpening their skills at getting into your wallet via your kids for thirty years, this is just the modern version of it. I remember my dad complaining when my Transformers comics and toys came covered in ads for more of the little bastards back in 1986.

    I suppose the difference was that lucky eight-year-olds back then didn't have to deal with adult collectors diving in to pick up all the rare ones first :D
    Reply +6
  • redcrayon 09/04/2015

    @Mr-V
    Hypothetically, would it make you feel better if the content wasn't on the disc, but it took you an extra ten minutes to download each piece of DLC?
    Reply +1
  • Code Name: STEAM update speeds up enemy turn times

  • redcrayon 09/04/2015

    Developed by Fire Emblem and Advance Wars studio Intelligent Systems, Code Name: STEVE launched in North America earlier this year.
    Er, 'Codename STEVE' ?! Wake up EG :-)
    Reply +20
  • Video: We very almost speedrun the Titan Souls demo

  • redcrayon 08/04/2015

    This looks great, but I don't really get the link to the Souls games outside of the name- the Shadow of the Colossus and Zelda references to the architecture and boss fight structure seem about right though. Reply +1
  • Bloodborne tops Japan sales chart

  • redcrayon 01/04/2015

    @CaptainKid
    I mean, if it's sitting on my armrest at home when my wife and I are watching the telly, I'm quite likely to pick it up and instantly dive back into a game for ten minutes rather than go into the office and start booting up my computer then loading a game. I might do that if I fancy a longer gaming session though.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 01/04/2015

    @CaptainKid
    Portability, accessibility? A tablet is a godsend if you're a gamer with a long commute. I used to dislike playing games on my phone, but my tablet is much better suited to my stubby fingers :D It's also nice to be able to instantly start/stop when I'm at home or in bed.

    I'm sure most people prefer playing games on their PC/home cinema setup but I love the instant sleep mode and portability of tablets and handhelds. I don't have much time for gaming at home and it allows me to still play lengthy rpgs and strategy games.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 01/04/2015

    @ver1go
    That sounds like far too broad a brushstroke to be true. Plenty of console games only require the lightest interaction with them, plenty of tablet games have a depth of interacting systems that demand your full attention, and plenty of players are interested in both. I've played strategy games on an iPad that had me lost in them for hours.
    Reply +3
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 3D review

  • redcrayon 01/04/2015

    I'd never have time to play it at home, so perfect commute fodder for me. Reply +1
  • Nintendo issues takedown notice for Super Mario 64 HD project

  • redcrayon 31/03/2015

    @arcam

    I agree with you there on people voting via popularity. For what it's worth, I'm firmly with Atari on that one despite enjoying TxK on the Vita.

    I'm not sure that Nintendo wins popularity contests by default around here though, and I think the 'emotional' argument against Atari, at least, revolved around the fact that they didn't seem to give a toss about Tempest until someone else did. That's kinda different, even though the trademark argument is the same.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 31/03/2015

    @arcam,

    They aren't suing him, a takedown notice is an attempt to avoid that.

    Even if we remove the argument of 'they must do this because precedent', I think it probably comes down to it being a relatively small amount of everyday work for their legal department. If I employed a legal department to protect my work, this crossed their desk and they didn't at least question the unauthorised use of my assets, I'd wonder why I bothered employing them.

    Sure, it comes across as 'faceless big company vs little fan', but I suppose their legal dept kinda had to do it once they were aware of it.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 31/03/2015

    @arcam.
    Sure, a couple of fan products don't threaten a trademark if we look at them in isolation. What if you have one of the most famous trademarks in an industry, used across games, merchandise, other media, clothing and a thousand pieces of knock-off tat across markets worldwide? What about five, or ten, or a hundred fan projects? Your post is the one based on very little understanding, as you seem to believe that only the current fan project under discussion is relevant, and that Mario is only rarely going to used outside of Nintendo's control. That absolutely isn't true, hasn't been for a long time, and is why protecting the use of the characters, where possible, is vital.

    It isn't reasonable (or even feasible) to expect Nintendo to try and stop every tiny tee-shirt maker making clothing with their trademarks on it. That's why the bigger online clothing sellers that advertise on EG occassionally come up with smart ways of referencing gaming IP without imposing on trademarks. It is absolutely reasonable to take action to stop a single, publicised source releasing a version of one of their most popular games, with their most popular character, that's why they have to be seen to do this.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 31/03/2015

    @arcam
    Nintendo aren't just 'within their rights' to have it taken down. If they don't have it taken down and defend their trademarks, it directly affects those 'rights' and their ability to do so in future if faced with a less savoury use of their IP.
    Reply +11
  • Battlefield Hardline fends off challenge of Bloodborne in UK chart

  • redcrayon 30/03/2015

    Presumably this also includes sales of Hardline on PS360? I wonder what the split between that and PS4/XBO is. Reply 0
  • redcrayon 30/03/2015

    @Nephirion
    To be fair, I imagine brand loyalty/awareness has helped Bloodborne too, regardless of quality. Both had fans of previous games and plenty of press coverage.

    Battlefield just has wider appeal/awareness amongst a large crowd looking for a new generic shooter across PC/PS3/PS4/360/XBO, and in total they outnumber fans of action games who also own a PS4 by a huge number, simple as that.

    Edit: lol at the negs for suggesting Bloodborne may have also been bought by fans of the souls games. Clearly a controversial observation.
    Reply +5
  • Bloodborne review

  • redcrayon 27/03/2015

    @penhalion
    I agree, one of the cornerstones of the mythos is that, while it costs them their sanity and often their life, good people can strive to at least put off the inevitable. And then hand the task down to their descendants through their memoirs (pro tip: never open your forebear's journal). I don't like much of the naff fan-fiction where modern investigators wield elder-signs like crucifixes, handily beating the minions of the dark gods easily, but some of the classics like Dunwich Horror work because of the sheer tenacity of the Miskatonic staff, facing down bowel-quaking horror in the name of science, humanity and a pipe full of good tobacco. It might have been an insignificant event in cosmic terms, but any scrap in which humanity clearly pulls a temporary win over Yog-Sothoth hardly makes the plucky academics insignificant on this planetary backwater. The Elder Gods want their planet back and are imprisoned and plotting our demise- surely by gaining their unwanted attention, that makes us unfortunately significant (yet doomed!). :D

    I read the books when I was at school, and the dogged pursuit of the unknown in Mountains of Madness made me want to explore the world more. And roll funny-sided non-euclidean dice.
    Reply +3
  • Nintendo might be making the most exciting online shooter in years

  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @IronSoldier
    Ah, suddenly all becomes clear. Cheers.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @Blammo72
    Are you actually 43 or so? Your entire dialogue in this thread is primary-school level at best. Use the filters rather than trolling threads.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @Blammo72
    Er, so I'm a hipster or possibly even a 'furry' for suggesting you don't click on articles about stuff you don't like? Ok mate.
    Reply +12
  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @Blammo72
    Perhaps you could not click on them, or use the filters to avoid them if you don't even want to be aware of their existence? The site puts up a bit of something for everyone, I know I only read about 10% of what they put up.
    Reply +11
  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @Mr.Spo
    Seeing as people have logged hundreds of hours in Monster Hunter using gestures, 'pinging' the map and a few pre-set phrases (and a few editable phrases for specific situations), I think they'll probably go with that. Let's face it, if the hardcore online crowd can get over the cartoony presentation, lack of voice chat isn't going to put them off. Most people mute everyone else after dealing with a few muppets anyway, I know I do.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 23/03/2015

    @YourFetish
    On the other hand, having local multiplayer and a single player campaign will mean you'll actually still be able to play Splatoon in a few years time. Lots of online games have their playerbase tail off after a year or two, leaving only the husk of a tacked-on single player game, I'm hoping Splatoon will be different. Still, it'll be interesting to see the reviews.
    Reply 0
  • People are selling the Final Fantasy 15 demo on eBay

  • redcrayon 19/03/2015

    Seeing as it's a digital code freely available in every purchase of a mass-market game rather than a collector's edition being scalped, I really don't have a problem with this, especially when the price is 60 for a digital copy of Type O that not everyone wants.

    I'm not overly impressed with Squenix for gating a demo behind a full game purchase so can hardly blame people for there being an interest in getting the demo without paying for a game they don't want.

    If people are happy to pay 20 for just an advance teaser demo because they have zero patience for something that will be free to everyone in good time, then fair enough, but it seems like something that should have been free to everyone now (with the bonus to SE of getting an expanded audience interested in FFXV), not used to scrape up sales from FF's long-suffering fanbase on a PSP port.

    Still, you know you have a fanbase by the balls when you can get them to pay for you to market your next product to them. After the XIII games I feel like SE should be paying me! :D
    Reply +9
  • With the announcement of the NX, Nintendo admits defeat with the Wii U

  • redcrayon 18/03/2015

    A huge amount of speculation in this article based on very few facts.

    The WiiU is a failure, sure. It won't have a lifespan longer than any other Nintendo home console, probably a year or two shorter. But have we seen anything suggesting that this new format is actually replacing the WiiU? As far as I can see, it looks like the idea is to have games playable across multiple formats, including the then-aging home console and whatever their new machines are.

    This article seems more like bolting old thinking about console lifecycles like 'console-follows-console' onto the news of a new business model designed to avoid the boom/bust/drought risks that have dogged their 'new box every five years' way of doing things.
    Reply +2