redcrayon Comments

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  • "I've seen people literally spend $15,000 on Mass Effect multiplayer cards"

  • redcrayon 23/10/2017

    @KTFX
    There's hundreds of games releasing every year, and less and less AAA ones. They take up most of the oxygen but in terms of numbers there's so many other great games worth playing.
    Reply +3
  • The Shin Megami Tensei game that's coming to Switch is Shin Megami Tensei 5

  • redcrayon 23/10/2017

    The sound (soundscape?) is good, it's a key part of the SMT games atmosphere to me. Maybe it's the audio cues and instruments that hark back to previous entries, that kind of thing. I'm not very good at explaining it. I just like it. :D Reply +6
  • When it comes to FIFA 18, you can most definitely cash out

  • redcrayon 23/10/2017

    @Mrsyms
    Do you have to read them? They publish 100+ articles a week. I get tired of the Destiny ones and so don't click on them.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 23/10/2017

    @Mrsyms
    No, it's more likely that gaf's implosion just took the 'biggest story' vibe.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 23/10/2017

    @dai_bonehead
    Odd comment. Trust and retaining a small piece of privacy (especially when having kids means you can't even use the loo in peace without little fingers appearing under the door) is more important than total transparency to loads of people. Joint accounts are cool if your incomes are wildly unbalanced (I.e. One of you is a stay-at-home parent that then spends more time using cash for kids events), even then some view them as archaic. A quick run through the bills each month and a rough idea of who is paying more of the standing orders is enough for us, we don't need to know what each other spend our (little) disposable income on.
    Reply +11
  • How video game difficulty became a cultural battleground

  • redcrayon 21/10/2017

    @udat
    how do you do quotes properly here? :D
    Use 'quote' and '/quote' in square brackets.
    Reply +1
  • Remembering Dyna Blaster, the first Battle Royale game I played

  • redcrayon 20/10/2017

    Super Bomberman with a multitap on the SNES and a couple of friends is how I remember those heady days, I remember it had the feature where dead players can hang out on the edges, lobbing bombs in out of spite! To this day Bomberman/Dynablaster sits up there with Worms as one of my favourite multiplayer games, mainly as they only need a few buttons, you can teach new friends to play as fast as you lose them :D Reply +1
  • In praise of bad game design

  • redcrayon 20/10/2017

    @neuroniky
    The difference between Megaman X and the modern 'map-as-jobs-list' being that, depending on the order you did the stages, the environments changed based on which ones had been previously completed, allowing access to new areas and items or removing hazards. Such a shame they abandoned that concept in later games, I always thought it was the best development of the Mega Man setup since the original 'choose your next stage' idea.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 20/10/2017

    Nice read, enjoyed that!

    Re. The headline- is anyone making or even commenting on games really saying that a game not being as streamlined as one that gently guides the player is 'bad' game design?

    Seems to me that the games that let players get lost or work out the mythology themselves, or pursue non-essential yet interesting sidequests (The Witcher) or offer odd bits of detail non-essential to progress (the hug button in A Boy and his Blob), or let players decisions raise the possibility of them continuing with little chance of success (Xcom, Fire Emblem) are often praised for such elements. Meanwhile, the 'all roads lead to the same point' school of design has come under a lot of criticism for modern RPGs often lacking the granular decision-making of older ones due to increased cost of voice acting etc.
    Reply +11
  • Fire Emblem Warriors review

  • redcrayon 19/10/2017

    @UncleLou
    To be fair, Metro's review is a bit of an outlier. At first glance, combat is simplistic compared to many action games, until you realise that it's not really about individual enemy units offering a challenge to the heroes- they are expected to be able to stride around the battlefield doing heroic shit and defeating whole platoons at a time. It's relatively simple so you can keep an eye on the minimap and deploy or switch to your allies to where they are needed, whether that's to run for an objective, defend a fort etc. Really you're playing two games at once, one of which is the power fantasy of being a monstrously capable hero, the other of which is keeping an eye on the battle as a whole, as it's possible for your favourite character to kill 600 people and still lose the battle if your force hasn't held on to any territory. Script is pretty bad though, I mean, it's a fanservice game about magic portals putting people from a half a dozen different worlds conveniently together. It was never going to be a stunning tale of consequence :D
    Reply +1
  • Dead Space is the sequel Resident Evil 4 deserved

  • redcrayon 18/10/2017

    @christopherherman
    There's a button that displays a direct coloured line leading to the next objective n Dead Space, isn't there? Been a while since I played it.
    Reply +4
  • Yes, Hitler is in Wolfenstein 2

  • redcrayon 18/10/2017

    Being surprised that Hitler is in a Wolfenstein game is a bit like getting to the end of a Castlevania title and thinking that the bloke with the cape and the fangs looks strangely familiar. Reply +3
  • EA has shut down Visceral Games

  • redcrayon 18/10/2017

    "What's everyone playing?"
    "Online looter shooters."
    "What are they buying after the initial £50?"
    "Microtransaction tat"
    "Star Wars fans have been buying endless amounts of add-on shit for years, why aren't we rinsing them too!"
    Reply +7
  • redcrayon 18/10/2017

    @SHPanda
    I preferred the original as well, but Dead Space 2 achieved high critical acclaim compared to the first title (as far as I remember).
    Reply 0
  • Rogue Trooper Redux review

  • redcrayon 17/10/2017

    Loved the comics as a kid but missed this first time around, will give it a go, I quite like shooters that aren't based around online play. Reply +2
  • Sony to release indie game on Nintendo Switch

  • redcrayon 17/10/2017

    @Kremlik
    Is the Switch really likely to lose joycons if used as a portable? I think it would have been more likely to lose the stylus from DS/3DS units, them being small and light and not immediately noticeable if they are missing (unlike half your controls!) but in a decade of constant play I haven't done that either.
    Reply +1
  • Online petition forces government response to loot boxes

  • redcrayon 16/10/2017

    @Sekuiya
    I'm not saying it's gambling. That doesn't mean I think it shouldn't be regulated. Lots of industries are subject to regulation without being gambling because they, their ad agencies and retailers can't help but take the piss, the junk food and booze ones for a start as I detailed below.

    Also, I don't play games on PC, I'm mainly talking about console games here. If you say lootboxes on Steam games are cool because players can trade then great, go for it, although I'm still not sure how you're not seeing how digital transactions are different to physical ones for such things. I'm arguing about the ones in £60 console games, that often have very little in common with sticker albums and trading cards due to the lack of such systems. A few 'good' examples aren't going to define how lootboxes work in the future, profit is unless we talk about it now.

    As for 'please', I'm sure you understood that when you wrote 'is a little one-sided for the company' that people reading that might raise one eyebrow and think that's a mild understatement! :D

    Perhaps we can agree that the model itself varies as publishers are trying different approaches, and that some are better than others.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 16/10/2017

    @Sekuiya
    No, because there are more dissimilarities than that, (ease of digital transactions being different to physical ones for children, smaller number of randomised items, higher number of high-value pulls, being able to write to the publisher at the end of the run to get missing ones for your collection, the collection having a physical presence, the initial buy-in not being £60, amongst others), the outside-the-publisher-economy was just one of the more obvious examples.

    Some loot box models are definitely better than others, though, I prefer ones where the player can trade anything they don't want (thus having the 'ease of use' element of digital actually work for the player in some way). I just don't think that the sticker and card collections (and kinder eggs) that I spent odd bits of my pocket money on in the 80s are in any way a reasonable comparison to loot boxes in £60 AAA console games.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 16/10/2017

    @Sekuiya
    Arguments that loot boxes are anything like trading cards isn't one I'd use either. With trading cards, by definition, there is an economy outside of publisher control where you can trade and sell with other collectors. With loot boxes you are only playing against the publisher, with hidden odds and a far greater array of digital trinkets, and thus opportunities to pull only things that are worthless (to you), than the range of any physical card collection.

    Kinder Eggs are another one my brother and I loved as kids, and another terrible comparison- the chocolate itself was alright, and the toys usually from very limited ranges of whatever was in that season, with a little flier inside of the others in the range. It wasn't a handful of things you might want and thousands of options of just worthless plastic sprues.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 16/10/2017

    @TheStoneRoses
    shouldn’t it be your responsibility to make sure you’re daughter doesn’t get her hands on this type of thing instead of wasting the governments time on it?
    I absolutely agree parents have to take responsibility as much as possible, but I also agree with stuff like the relatively recent UK restrictions on junk food advertising to children. It's one thing for me to teach my children about healthy eating while being firm about what they can and can't have, that's on me, but it's irritating to do so when being undermined at every opportunity by a small army of millionaire creative agencies that now have decades of experience in selling sugary shit to kids via any means possible. It's then tacitly backed up by the supermarkets POS material offering promotions on sweet stuff everywhere you turn. I've got a handful of years experience as a parent, and like to think I'm fairly media-savvy, I work in media and love tinkering with our parental controls on wireless networks, search engines, consoles etc while talking about it with my daughter, but it was (and still is) relentless. If industries that target kids showed the capacity for even the slightest bit of restraint, I'd be less cynical, but they don't, so I am.

    As an aside, this already happens for adults, where the ASA now has all manner of recent additions in rules regarding the advertising of alcohol to young people (they aren't allowed to use actors under 25, encourage binge drinking or suggest it makes people tough/confident etc), mainly due to the utter lack of restraint shown by the ad industry when left to police itself.

    This relates to the games industry in that, left unchecked, media only follows the money and gets better at it, that's not a good thing for anyone but them, whether you care more about children being exposed to predatory business models or quality game design. An industry that demonstrates a complete lack of restraint is asking for regulation, and seeing as lootboxes have undoubtedly made a selection of the biggest publishers a huge amount of money, somehow I don't think 'restraint' is going to be as popular a word as either 'money' or 'lootboxes' in the boardrooms of publishers right now. That some gamers love them isn't a reason not to keep an eye on it- I love beer and mars bars but wouldn't trust either industry as far as I could throw it.
    Reply +5
  • Shadow of War players are using tricks and cheats to combat loot boxes

  • redcrayon 13/10/2017

    It's there, from my perspective, for people who are protective of their spare time and scared when a massive game comes along that they're not getting to see the full experience.
    That, to me, sounds like a game that isn't worth £60 for a busy person. Why would I pay £60 then pay more to avoid grindy gameplay and 'get the full experience'? The 'full experience' sounds a bit wanky to me.
    Reply +4
  • Are loot boxes gambling?

  • redcrayon 13/10/2017

    @parkboyer
    That is another of the things that bothers me about microtransactions, the constant begging for money throughout the game even when I've already paid to pay it.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 12/10/2017

    @JoelStinty
    I absolutely agree with your point, it's just a shame that it's some of the biggest games from hugely successful multi-media franchises that seem first to the 'loot boxes in paid games' trough. CoD, Battlefield, Shadow of War, Assassins Creed etc would be hugely successful in terms of revenue with or without them. Enough is never enough for them, having several of the biggest publishers and franchises adopting a business model that will inevitably impact game design on some level is absolutely worth talking about.

    Still, as you say, it's not like there's a shortage of other stuff to play, large and small titles included. Currently downloading Wulverblade. Can't wait.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 12/10/2017

    @kaya08
    By 'a guarantee of a return of some kind', it has to something of debatable equivalent value to avoid being gambling. A guaranteed return of a penny on a £1 bet is clearly a very, very poor deal- you may as well say that any complimentary hospitality in a casino stops it being gambling as you're getting something even if you put a grand on red and lose two minutes later. The idea is that, with lootboxes, stickers etc, you are agreeing to exchange £x for x random items from a large selection, whether they are the ones you want is immaterial, one mans paper/plastic/digital trash is another's treasure. You are effectively making a blind purchase, not placing a bet. With gambling, you are entering an agreement to put money down before a random chance that you might get nothing at all, might get a return of far superior financial gain than your bet.

    /not an expert, happy to be corrected!
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 12/10/2017

    @Norlo
    Fair enough mate, happy to leave that point there, I appreciate you're trying to keep discussion on track :-)
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 12/10/2017

    @Norlo
    I'm not getting sidetracked at all. The point is that lootboxes aren't like sticker albums, they are much, much worse in terms of both odds and initial investment. Your point of 'but both give you something!' is irrelevant when my point isn't that lootboxes are gambling, it's that sticker albums are a poor comparison because you could actually complete the collection in reasonable time and trade with both the publisher and other players to get what you want.

    As for 'how would publishers fund AAA games without them', there have been plenty of successful AAA games this gen that didn't use them. The key thing linking the current games under discussion for using them is that they arent the ones struggling to fund development, they are already part of hugely successful multimedia franchises. They absolutely don't need lootboxes to survive, it's just that where profit is concerned 'enough is never enough' to quote that cartoon regarding greed and indulgence, 'Over the Hedge'.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 12/10/2017

    Really not sure how sticker albums are a valid comparison. When I collected them in the 80s/early 90s, the book itself was dirt cheap, you could easily swap with your friends/classmates and at the end of the season, you could write to Panini and they'd send you the ones you wanted if they had any left. The number of items in the collection was also extremely limited compared to the number of possibilities in loot boxes. Neither are gambling but sticker albums, despite the complaints of parents at the time, were nowhere near as predatory, cynical and worthless as loot boxes in a £60 game. Reply +4
  • Stealthy murder mop-'em-up Serial Cleaner is sweeping onto Switch later this year

  • redcrayon 11/10/2017

    I like the idea of disposing of bodies by feeding them to crocs, seems quite fun. Stylish too. Reply +2
  • Stardew Valley review

  • redcrayon 10/10/2017

    @neilka
    Stephen's Sausage S(and)witch? It's going to take them a while to ketchup.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 10/10/2017

    @SiroccoJetProp
    People talk of Sony bias and Xbox bias around here too. There is a visible trend. In that they are all talking bollocks due to their own irrational feelings of their preferred multinational company being hard done by. Bless.
    Reply +22
  • Capcom's hard play for the west has resulted in a very different Monster Hunter

  • redcrayon 04/10/2017

    I'm really excited to see how this plays out for MH games going forward. After a thousand hours enjoying the gameplay loop of the previous games, I'm pretty much ready to move on, and a lot of the changes and the new monsters look great to me. Reply 0
  • Cuphead review

  • redcrayon 02/10/2017

    @faizi1997
    I guess Eurogamer can only give 'Recommended' or 'Essential' to Nintendo games. Really getting tired of the bias.
    Other commenters seem to think they are biased towards Sony. Really getting tired of people thinking that a site employing a couple of dozen writers and freelancers would have an editorial policy of bias towards a manufacturer of one of the many platforms they cover. Most editorial teams I've worked with go to great pains to avoid influence from their commercial side, even though if anything it would make more sense to be biased towards the publishers whose media agencies buy the most ad space than a blanket policy requiring all staff and freelancers to support the electronic toy of choice in print, like a 90s playground spat writ large.
    Reply 0
  • Watch: Ian plays the SNES mini for 90 minutes

  • redcrayon 01/10/2017

    @saxxonde
    Absolutely, there's half a dozen games there I'd happily swap out for more of my personal favourites from back in the day, but if the brief was to show off a small selection of the best or most popular/familiar titles across as many genres as possible for as wide appeal as possible, I don't think they've done too badly at all. Super Aleste/Space Megaforce and Legend of the Mystical Ninja were two of my most played, but I totally get why FF, Street Fighter, Kirby, Mega Man, Zelda, Castlevania and Metroid are there instead for the western release.

    Speaking of genres, I was a bit surprised at first at the lack of a scrolling shooter like Aleste, Axelay, UN Squadron, Gradius, R-Type etc, but I suppose Starfox 1/2 have the 'little spaceship' angle covered!
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 01/10/2017

    @Darkolol
    Depends what you mean by graphics really, what caught my eye with the SNES when seeing it on a demo station in Dixons in 1990 or whatever was the animation in Super Mario World combined with the upbeat music, it looked like a huge upgrade from our NES/Amstrad etc and certainly 'blew the minds' of my brother and I. Of course there were better graphics kicking around on computers and in the arcades, but the whole package looked so colourful and enticing to us. No wonder Sega packaged Sonic with the Mega Drive after that, as it made Altered Beast look a bit drab in comparison.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 01/10/2017

    @saxxonde
    My theory is that they tried to have a bit of variety in the games list. Seeing as Secret of Mana is the one most EU players will remember more than CT or FFVI which didn't release here, that got first choice on a global list, alongside Mario RPG. With two lengthy JRPGs already out of twenty games, they probably only wanted one more of Square's RPGs at the most and either flipped a coin or thought that FF was more recognisable name to players who have perhaps lapsed from gaming over the years.

    It would have been great if Contra III had the option to play it as Super Probotector:Alien Rebels, that was my favourite unlockable in Contra 4 on DS.
    Reply +1
  • Nintendo Super NES Classic mini review

  • redcrayon 01/10/2017

    @DEDE1973
    I have to admit, the concept of a games 'drought' didn't ever occur to me in the early 90s when the sheer price of games meant that realistically I only received them as presents and saved up for one or two extra ones a year through my paper round. The £40 price tag was by far my biggest complaint as a teenager! :D

    It helped that the SNES had a strong early library- between SMW, Pilotwings, UN Squadron, Actraiser, Final Fight, Castlevania IV and Zelda a bit later on, I don't think I ever sat and thought 'there are no games I want to buy right now', even if there were gaps in quality releases in later years.

    Games 'droughts' are something that young adults see when they have plenty of money and free time to burn through all the latest games on release. These days I only have time to play half a dozen a year even if I can reasonably afford to play pretty much anything I want.
    Reply +19
  • Star Fox 2 review

  • redcrayon 28/09/2017

    @Shawn855
    They'd probably get people moaning about 'spoilers' if they showed it! :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 27/09/2017

    @DanielPlainview
    Can't say I'm overly interested in Danganronpa, and I probably spend a lot more of my gaming time playing niche Japanese games on the portables than most people on here. Starfox 2 isn't just an 'old SNES game', it's a selling point of the SNES classic and the subject of various rumours about it for the last 20+ years. Considering the average age of EG's readership and the popularity of retro articles, I suspect Starfox 2 is of more interest here. Anyone looking for news on the latest visual novel about Japanese teenagers probably isn't looking here, and every site can only allocate its budget/resources sparingly when they can only ever cover a minuscule amount of the hundreds of niche games released each year. Everyone thinks their favourites should get coverage- personally I would have loved to have seen a Monster Hunter Stories review- but realistically it's hard to please everyone when EG quite rightly also spend time covering deserving smaller stuff that isn't going to get a dozen reviews and championed by a small but dedicated fanbase elsewhere.
    Reply +2
  • A dog has turned my life into an RPG

  • redcrayon 26/09/2017

    @Doomspoon
    Thanks for the tip! Do you ever eat at foodilic (western road)? I sometimes grab lunch there with my brother, he's vegetarian and quite likes it there.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 26/09/2017

    I've often thought Brighton is a bit of an rpg town. Lots of adventurers passing through, rolling hills outside full of wildlife worth 1xp, the Lanes are full of shops selling overpriced tat and there's probably plenty of dungeons. Overpriced coffee but quality restaurants- I recommend the Giggling Squid in Market Street for Thai food (they are a chain now but the Brighton one was the first). Reply +4
  • Shadow of War developer discusses the game's controversial loot boxes

  • redcrayon 25/09/2017

    @Sasha_
    Sales numbers are not always an indication of good trends for the industry, as the piles of licensed shovelware that filled the ranks of platformers in the 80s and 90s, followed by endless shooter clones as publishers chased the money, followed by IAP in full-price games today, can attest. Not every financially viable trend is wonderful for the long-term health of the genre even if it makes one particular game a raging success- damage to consumer confidence can end up pissing in the pond all the publishers are drinking from.
    Reply +4
  • SteamWorld Dig 2 review

  • redcrayon 20/09/2017

    Definitely going to pick this up, I love the Steamworld games. Reply +1
  • Monster Hunter World gets global release date

  • redcrayon 19/09/2017

    That trailer was great, good to see some old favourites mixed with the new monsters, I love their creature designs. Reply -1
  • Skyrim's Switch release date slated for November

  • redcrayon 14/09/2017

    @FilthyAnimal
    I agree with the thrust of your point but wouldn't Zelda have filled that slot for them? Maybe it's about selling devs on 'western' open world games.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/09/2017

    @Ste_Eagles
    Alternatively, 'a huge game that only came out six years ago on large home consoles and PCs can now be played on a portable the size of a tablet.' Depends on your point of view, I enjoyed Skyrim on release (well, once they fixed the PS3 issues) but am definitely looking forward to having it on a portable so I can chip away at it more easily. I don't have time to sit in front of the telly for timesinks any more.
    Reply +4
  • Doom and Wolfenstein 2: The New Colossus are coming to Switch

  • redcrayon 14/09/2017

    @mega-gazz
    I thought that until I played Killzone Mercenary on the Vita. I suppose that has the advantage of being specifically designed for a portable, but having said that I've put hundreds of hours into Monster Hunter and dozens into shmups like Darius on portables too, it's not like you can't play intensive action games on them.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 14/09/2017

    Really pleased to see Wolfenstein II there, Id been thinking 'I'd love to see that since seeing the e3 trailer'. Just having it on a portable makes a huge difference for me. Reply +2
  • Splatoon is a multiplayer shooter for introverts and I love it

  • redcrayon 14/09/2017

    Having played over a thousand hours of Monster Hunter online and needing nothing more than the signals for 'everyone come here' and a few editable prompts for 'help' and 'wait' etc, I can't say I've ever missed voice chat. Seems useful in more
    complex PvP games though.
    Reply +8
  • Bungie removes "hate symbol" from Destiny 2

  • redcrayon 13/09/2017

    @Excelsion
    "History being written by the victor" is true, but while atrocities like the Holocaust might have been carefully glossed over in history books if the Axis powers had won, it still wouldn't change the atrocities from having happened. The best way to find out about life in Nazi Germany in the late 30s and early 40s is from the people who survived it. The Holocaust differs from many historical attempts at genocide in that it happened in the 20th century in Central Europe. The first survivors of it had contacts and relatives in neighbouring countries and a postal/rail network following centuries of European civilisation, were able to see it coming, flee or write and tell the tale, with recording equipment and the evidence left afterwards clear for all to see as Allied troops found the camps afterwards. Not all attempts at extermination were so unsuccessful in keeping it quiet, the march of technology both enabling it and recording it for posterity so it might never happen again.

    That isn't Allied countries going 'we won, so Holocaust evil!' That's people worldwide going 'what the fuck did they do, mechanised genocide on that scale is an abomination no matter who wins the martial contest'. Some of the bravest men and women who tried to save people, those friends and neighbours and children, from it, or alert the allies, were German. By denying its evil by arguing 'victors decide what's right!', you render their attempts to do the right thing in the face of state-led murder, torture and genocide by their own leaders inconsequential.

    Note thatplenty of political regimes (including most of the home countries of people posting here at one time or another) have lost wars in the past without being called 'evil', a term of wrongness on an existential scale. War is eternal, but trying to exterminate your own bloody people is something else.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 13/09/2017

    @Raizing
    Are you really going down the 'we can only call specific members of the Nazi party Nazis' route out of pedantry? When hate groups adopt aspects of their racial purity ideology and iconography, calling them 'modern day nazis' seems pretty fair to me, particularly when white supremacist groups exist that pretty much describe themselves as such.
    Reply +7