redcrayon Comments

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  • Mass Effect Andromeda is another failure for trans representation

  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @the_milkybar_kid
    What happens when there's an LGBT character in a film or series? Nothing, because it doesn't have to be pushed to the fore to satisfy the SJW crowd.
    Have you considered that such characters in games also get talked about because
    a) they remain a rare occurrence and so people look at them with interest, criticising some and praising others.
    b) any kind of LGBT reference in a game gets jumped on by a different crowd screaming 'keep politics out of my videogames' as the more acceptable public face of 'keep any kind of increased diversity in the cast out of my videogames'?

    Yes, it would be nice if that second bunch would respond to such characters the way TV audiences do too. If the end point is a variety of well-written characters in games, without being tokens but without having to justify their inclusion either, and without a load of people screaming about SJWs, triggered snowflakes, and progressive/liberal agendas (is that the whole tedious litany of that line of discussion now?) on the internet about it, then great.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @PixelJumper
    What part of the article are you referring to? Nowhere does it mention trans characters as romance options, just poor dialogue for a minor npc.

    Have you just used the article to crowbar in a load of crap about a fear of 'trap' lovers or something?
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @Badassbab
    As opposed to those who would consider themselves the opposite of a 'SJW', who absolutely never get angry about matters regarding diversity in computer games, ever, right?

    Saying 'SJW' three times doesn't somehow make that ridiculous term for anyone who gives a toss any more valid, I appreciate it must be nice to have a simplistic badge to chuck everything you don't like under though.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @yukushi
    You mean the black dude playing the gatekeeper of the space bridge of the alien Asgardian civilisation that humanity has interpreted as the Norse gods in Marvel's fantastical superhero mythology?

    Agree with your second example, sure, if they remake Zulu/Zulu Dawn I don't want to see a single white guy like me legging it downhill amongst the rest of the attacking force either, but that Asgardian is a fictional comics character and they get re-imagined all the time. I'm totally ok with Samuel Jackson playing Nick Fury when I grew up reading the comics of him being a cigar-chomping white commando guy too, his brand of world-weary charisma suits the character.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @yukushi
    Why would such characters need to have any bearing on the story to be there? Agree that no character should be there just to serve an agenda, but they shouldn't need a higher barrier of plot relevance than a white bloke to be there either.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @Bran-Tse-Mallory
    Presumably if you don't care about characters orientation, sex etc you'd want all romance, flirting and characters designed to be attractive completely out of games too, because they just need to be characters?

    These aspects are all a part of characters, but I do think they need to not be handled as clumsily as they are in ME:A. I think a universal human trait is probably not to spill the toughest parts of your history to a stranger/colleague you've just met in the first two sentences, so if that's what you mean, then sure, sounds good to me.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @Sebeastian
    I don't think anyone should be forced to write anything they dont want to, but for an in-house writer, if the brief is 'we need a script for several dozen friendly human npcs, write a diverse cast', then they are pretty much going to have to, they can't just say in a writing job interview that 'I'm only good at writing people like me'. Any game writer, working for a company that is building 'universes', is going to see that a lot.

    One of my favourite fantasy authors is Robin Hobb, the pen name of Margaret Ogden, whose main series character, Fitz, is a bloke I've followed for a number of books now. She writes him (and a wide cast of supporting characters, mostly male) better than any number of lesser male authors writing violent fantasy dross, but has a pen name because her publisher thought that men wouldn't buy it otherwise. As you say, sure, she's a good writer. But writing other characters who aren't like you is something every writer has to do when filling out their world even if the lead is pretty much themselves.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @stevecrook
    Yeah, rejuvenation is a common one for futurists, some of Peter Hamilton's books have that, with the wealthy able to afford to constantly look young.

    With regard to 'old' characters, I always liked Wynne from Dragon Age. A lot of her dialogue was interesting as it added the perspective and wisdom on minor aspects of the group dynamic that comes from experience rather than the natural charisma protagonists tend to be born with that attracts and binds their adventuring party to them. Considering that RPGs tend to favour relatively young casts caught up in epic battles and star-crossed romances, having an elderly lady there was great.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @Sebeastian
    Good writers should be able to write good scripts for characters that aren't exactly like them. Plenty of game characters exist that have characterful, engaging or at least non-clunky dialogue and were written by people very, very different and in completely different situations. It takes research and experience to do it well, but it can be done, writers have been doing it for centuries. It would be great if we had a more diverse industry making games but in the mean time, considering that might take years or decades, asking for better writing/editing at the same time isn't unreasonable either.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @el-pollo-diablo
    I think it's more that they are getting bashed for clumsy writing than for not being progressive enough. For a studio that mainly makes RPGs, critique of poor writing isn't a bad thing. I think they could have done it as part of an article looking at poor writing across the board (because a good editor would have improved the whole script rather than one conversation), rather than focusing on just a couple of sentences from one character though.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @MrTomFTW
    I like the 'aviation police', it's funny to see how many of them fixate on wings as that was the topical future tech at the time (only a few years later HG Wells was predicting warfare conducted by aircraft bombing cities far from the reach of land-based armies, that then became a terrifying reality).

    I like the way 'battle cars' kinda predicts Mad Max etc too!
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @cozmium
    You made an account just to say that? To paraphrase your words, this article is a 'drop in the ocean' of all the opinion pieces regarding contributor perspectives on various aspects of games on EG.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @stevecrook

    Just in case its of interest, have you ever looked at these visions of the year 2000 from 1900? Always makes me smile when imagining the future. It's really hard for even good creatives to escape the limitations their mind puts on future tech and trends based on current tech, I'm reading Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie at the moment (space opera set thousands of years in the future) and that's really good.
    https://publicdomainreview.org/collections/france-in-the-year-2000-1899-1910/
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @tompagenet
    I agree that the 'start a new identity in a new Galaxy, 600 years in the future' isn't insensitive or crass- actually I think it's the opposite, and in the hands of good writers could be the start of an awesome character arc. I do think it's handled a touch clumsily just in how they blurt it all put to the player though.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @hobowithashotgun
    More like 'new galaxy, old problems' if that's the attitude going with them. Fortunately the cast seem a bit more chilled (if poorly animated etc etc).
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @mouseymouse
    What do you mean 'these kind of articles?'

    I thought it was quite interesting, I've never heard of a 'dead name' before, the more you know etc.

    I think Bioware is in a bit of a bind here- they have a reputation for having diverse characters and relationships within the cast, which is great, but then they feel the need to have characters talk about their identity (if they aren't immediately visible) almost straight away. I don't think I've ever had a conversation with someone I've just met where they laid their soul bare quite so easily, it just feels awkward. Admittedly in RPGs npcs often tell you their secrets without you even asking (or wanting the attached sidequest), but I think the issue is with Bioware feeling the need to have characters wear their identities clearly rather than reveal them over time. Maybe they don't want someone to get halfway through the game and think 'I haven't seen anyone like me yet', but this seems a bit of an inelegant treatment of something that could have been given far more importance and intimacy (no matter as friends or lovers) for them trusting to share something with you later on.
    Reply +6
  • The joy of Rime and the petrification of indie gaming

  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    @Dreadjaws
    In a similar vein, I'm really getting into Darkest Dungeon at the moment. The psychology aspect of it (presumably nicked from the Call of Cthulhu tabletop games) has me hooked, as I'm feeling sorry for my adventuring parties as I drag them from where they cling onto the scraps of their sanity in the bar, brothel and chapel and fling them into terrifying combat underground again. No other dungeon crawler has really had me quite so worried about my troops, even the ones with life points and permadeath.

    I've played a lot of smaller titles where the art style is taken from other sources, but what I like about both DD and Steamworld Heist/Dig is that their styles are very much their own. I've always liked the lighting on the Steamworld games, the sparks of tools and projectiles on stone and metal, that kind of thing.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 28/03/2017

    Much as I agree that 'indie' has become a useless term as a descriptive these days, I'd have more faith in EG's coverage of games that aren't from the usual AAA publishers if they didn't commission five articles on a weaker AAA game that's already plastered all over the games media. There's hundreds of great smaller games (across console, PC, mobile and portables) that do something new few others have covered and don't have EA's ad budget backing them up.

    I love EG's quirky take on stuff but a bit less revelling in the media storm of an awesome/average/terrible big release and a bit more coverage of the smaller stuff that hasn't had every single minute of its content raked over by several dozen media outlets and youtubers please :-)
    Reply +1
  • Mass Effect Andromeda physical launch sales down on ME3

  • redcrayon 27/03/2017

    @trissmerigold1
    The comparison is unwarranted as ME3 was released when physical editions were still going strong (Now they're not)
    Really? I'm pretty sure the majority of sales will still be physical copies of the console games. Physical copies are still far cheaper than PSN etc, although sure, we still don't have any firm numbers. Do you?
    Meaning that it actually really sold
    well? Like these articles are twisting and reaching to turn a success into a negative and I'm just shaking my head at how gullible folks are.
    I'm not sure how you are making the jump from 'we don't know how many digital sales there are' to 'meaning it sold really well'. How are you drawing that line of logic? What kind of percentage do you think the digital sales make up these days?
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 27/03/2017

    @Money_sandwhch
    By definition, a fad that doesn't go away isn't a fad. It might be a well-worn sentiment that's been explored at length over and over again, but it isn't a fad.
    Reply +7
  • How to triple your Switch battery life for under 20

  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @JAK620
    That's ridiculous. I often leave my phone or my tablet happily charging from my battery pack in my bag, and if I'm watching a film on the train, I've usually got the tablet plugged into it with the bag containing the battery pack on my lap.
    Reply +6
  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @OurDogFudge
    I use that one, if it's anything like mine it'll do you proud. Solid little gadget.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @mega-gazz
    Fair enough, doesn't sound like it's for you. I take your point on chargers, sure, it's something they should have done a decade ago, maybe I'm just surprised that they've used some common sense there at last.

    I do think that you're ignoring the way that modern tablets and phones burn through their battery really quick with high-power games too though, and that's why charge points and battery banks exist for a society with almost blanket use of such mobile devices. None of them are particularly wonderful if you want to play a high power-draw game miles away from a socket for hours on end and not carry a battery bank.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @mega-gazz
    I think having a decent suspend/sleep mode helps as you aren't going to lose progress, at least compared to the 3DS and it's terrible battery loss when asleep.

    Why can't you play while charging? Can't you just run a USB-C cable into the bottom and charge from a socket or a battery pack? With regard to 'flexibility', I play while travelling a lot and welcome the Switch charging via standard USB as it means I can use the same battery bank across my phone, tablet and portable now, I'm so glad they ditched the proprietary charger.

    Do you mean 'can't charge if it's in the stand?' Agree that's a design oversight. Sorry if I've got the wrong end of the stick here.

    You seem to think that the battery in the Switch, which is pretty standard for modern tablets, is somehow poor design. It really isn't, if you use a modern tablet or phone for gaming on the move then charge cables and battery banks are a useful thing there too. If you're carrying a tablet or a Switch you're probably carrying a bag too. A small battery bank is about the size of a phone, it's hardly an unreasonable concession to the limits of modern battery tech combined with the power draw of modern games.

    at 2 and a bit hours that still sits at the extreme low end of battery life (especially given as the device plays 'proper' games designed to be played for extended periods).
    2 and a bit hours on a game like Zelda on max brightness isn't unreasonable for a 300 modern tablet. Most people will get closer to 3 by not having it on max settings if they aren't near a charge point. Even then, how often are you going to sit with a portable for over two hours where you a) aren't near a charge point or b) don't have a bag couldn't possibly carry a small battery pack? It just seems like you're reaching to find the most extreme situation to claim it's poor design here. Sure, if I wanted to sit in the park all afternoon AND play Zelda on my Switch AND play it at max settings AND not carry a bag or anything then sure, it doesn't look like you can do that. I still don't think that's unreasonable as you couldn't do that with a high power-draw game on pricier tablets either.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @mega-gazz
    The battery life of smartphones would have been considered the same compared to mobiles ten years ago. Charging points in trains/coffee shops, industry standard USB charge cables and battery packs are all concessions to the limits of battery tech compared to other advances in mobile devices.

    I mean, I mostly charge my smartphone from my computer at work or on the train now, I couldn't do that ten years ago, and I do the same with USB cables from portables now too.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 26/03/2017

    @Trinitron
    Monumental lack of understanding that others have different lifestyles and demands on their time. Not everyone has hours to sit in front of a home cinema system, between parenting and working I mainly play on my commute, and besides, being chained to a particular screen feels archaic to me these days when half the the TV/films I do watch I do so on a tablet. I like being able to watch/play/listen/read something at home and then take it with me to make the most of my free time, I do that for books, music, tv and film, why not games? Even when I do play at home, sometimes I'd rather do so in bed or not take up the telly. I totally get why some people will only play on their home cinema setup- it's a cool way to play, but not everyone can or wants to.

    Flexibility, a console being whatever you want to be at the time, is as much a selling point as raw grunt under the telly to some people. It's why MP3 players and docks to play them at home sell millions compared to hefty stereo systems despite being blatantly worse sound quality. Some people care more about convenient access to the raw content itself.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 25/03/2017

    @sloth09
    Very few tablets and phones would be able to play a game with the power draw of BotW at max brightness and wifi on for over three hours. The Switch's battery life is on par with current battery tech, it's bizarre to compare playing a AAA game like Zelda at max. Brightness with general phone use. There are plenty of mobile games that are far less demanding than Zelda that destroy my phone's battery in a similar timeframe.

    I have a long commute and already carry an Anker battery pack in my bag for my phone, just in case, it's really solid, I recommend that one.
    Reply +6
  • Playtonic to ditch JonTron from Yooka-Laylee following anti-immigrant comments

  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    Is it just me or is there a larger than usual amount of American posters on this thread? Reply +1
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @d0x
    An attack yesterday in the UK, another attempted attacked today in Brussels....Yet there isn't even a plan to do anything about it.
    An attack on Wednesday in the UK. By a bloke from Kent, UK, who grew up in Tunbridge Wells, with a history of violent criminal activity throughout the 80s and 90s here.

    Not really sure how using it as ammunition for an anti-immigration stance really works. Did you just see the word 'Muslim' and make some convenient assumptions from there about migration or something? People from a dozen different countries were hurt in the attack at Westminster, if there's any multicultural factor to it, it's that.

    Please don't use tragic events you clearly know nothing about as evidence for a rant against people you don't know. The equivalent would be me, the next time some disturbed American bloke goes on the rampage with a gun, going on a rant and somehow blaming immigration from Mexico to back up an argument about securing UK borders. It doesn't make any sense.
    Reply +12
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @DrStrangelove
    The whole 'I'm sorry you're upset' thing has long annoyed me as the most insincere apology/not apology someone can make. It's essentially 'there's something wrong with you if you found my reasonable position upsetting, I feel sorry for you'.

    If an apology is worth making it's worth making wholeheartedly and with modesty, not insincerely weaselling it and hoping nobody notices.
    Reply +8
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @kangarootoo
    Fair points- I won't reply here as were way off topic but sure, happy to concede a good chunk of that.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @Cometothefall
    Looking around my office, our fabled tea-making skills have taken a severe dip this century. Milk in last you heathens! :D
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @kangarootoo
    Even if you don't believe in gods, you can still think that organised religion is often not a wonderful thing as it can encourage people to justify all kinds of horrible stuff, abandon personal responsibility for it, hide behind strength in numbers and claim a moral source higher than society itself. That's not to say that all organised religions (or their followers) do that, or that the same horrific social consequences can't occur from affiliation to other non-religious organisations.

    I've always thought personal faith in something can be a wonderful thing, inspiring people or allowing them to cope with awful circumstances. However, organised religion unifies that into a powerful, corporeal bureaucratic structure that is inherently prone to corruption, growth and promoting itself the larger it gets, and its those traits that then have an impact on people who don't want anything to do with it. That's my problem with religion itself as opposed to whatever it worships or any individual adherent to it. There's plenty of stuff we can lay at the feet of the very structure of an organisation, a religion or a country etc while not finding fault with any specific part of it, mainly as humans seem to like pyramid schemes that focus a huge amount of power at the top.
    I'm way off topic so I'll leave it there.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @robinsad
    How on earth is it censorship? Playtonic aren't obligated to use work they've paid for. It's not censorship when an actor gets cut from a film either.

    Nobody is stopping him spouting his vile bullshit, the fact that anyone can have a YouTube channel and talk on it is pretty much proof of that. What the freedom to express yourself doesn't give you is others being obligated to associate with you, listen to you or host/publish work featuring your voice that they've paid for. Even JonTron understands that.
    Reply +11
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    @Kain1
    I think the problem for people like you and I that are mystified by the appeal of it is that it is incredibly important to young people, Youtubers can become incredibly influential to them, incredibly quickly, and that has the potential to really skew the gaming media of the future.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 24/03/2017

    Most of his fanbase seem to be Internet kiddies shocked by how the real world works. Tech developers/media companies don't use small amounts of stuff supplied by freelancers all the time, let alone if that freelance turns out to be a massive racist on YouTube. Nobody is stopping him saying what he wants to say, YouTube thrives on people saying what they think is 'edgy' or 'unsayable', but he should probably stick to the internet where a crowd can be found to support any viewpoint, no matter how stupid, rather than expect any modern responsible company to turn a blind eye to that shit. Executives with far more pull get fired for saying something silly but relatively harmless (apart from to their company) on Twitter all the time, let alone spending hours expanding on their bonkers, naive and racist worldview on YouTube. Reply +12
  • Left Joy-Con issues resolved for future units, Nintendo claims

  • redcrayon 23/03/2017

    @Jabberwocky
    So if they accept that there was an issue that they are sorting out in the manufacturing phase then surely they are responsible for replacing or repairing the units out there that are defective?
    Isn't that what they are doing by asking people to give them a ring if there's a problem, and they'll repair it for free inside of a week if it's the controller? That sounds like accepting responsibility for repairing/replacing to me.

    'Manufacturing variation' is a bit of weasel-words though, I agree it sounds like it isn't a problem, just a natural variation in the process. It then makes everything following sound a bit insincere.
    Reply +2
  • How to actually enjoy Mass Effect: Andromeda

  • redcrayon 23/03/2017

    I find this kind of 'have a cynical eye towards npc requests rather than viewing them as an obligatory jobs list' advice applies to most modern RPGs and open world games, but especially those that seem to have been developed as a 30 hour game with an additional 30 hours of bloat stuck on top. It's optional, but it gets really tedious when every game location has a couple of 'find 5x this' or 'kill 10x that' quests. Easier to add than engaging, entertaining and surprising missions that make you glad you stepped off the beaten track I suppose.

    What I really want to see RPGs do is have a way to remove sidequests from your log, and reset them as if you never started them, particularly games that start adding them to your journal if you even overhear something about a missing piece of homework. Mass Effect 3 was bad for this, but also Skyrim- when playing a trader I don't really see the need to have 'join the assassins guild' permanently sat on my 'to do' list.
    Reply +4
  • How Zelda and Horizon fix open worlds in very different ways

  • redcrayon 22/03/2017

    Not sure why people can't grasp that a publication has many different writers. Expecting all writers to conform to the 'party line' on any given game, or, even worse, what the rest of the critics say, is a far worse proposition than publishing a variety of pieces about a game and sticking the writer's name at the top.

    Some commenters seem to take a review they don't agree with really personally. Try having really niche tastes, you'll see that few reviewers really like anything you do :D
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 22/03/2017

    Buying an open world game often feels like paying money to do a second job, one they have to work through in eight hour shifts. People used to crave realism in video games, but this isn't what they had in mind
    Nice article, this is exactly what an awful lot of open-world games feel like to me (I also agree it's a genre term that is becoming meaningless as so many different games adopt the template).

    Horizon and Zelda both have me wanting to play them though, it's nice to read something that is less interested at putting them against each other and more interested in what they both bring to the (increasingly crowded) table.
    Reply +10
  • Mass Effect: Andromeda review

  • redcrayon 20/03/2017

    @Indication
    Just because EG gave no particular accolade to either this or Horizon doesn't mean the reviews are similar. They praised and criticised different aspects of both, with the general tone of the Horizon review being significantly more positive than this one. I read the Horizon review and came away thinking 'that sounds alright to me', with this one, despite enjoying the last half-dozen Bioware RPGs, not so much.

    As an aside, I find my general 'add a point or two if you really like this sort of thing' works wonders with reviews of niche games, but it doesn't work as well with mass-market AAA games focus-grouped to oblivion.
    Reply +1
  • Blaster Master Zero: Switch vs... NES?

  • redcrayon 19/03/2017

    One of my favourites back in the day, I also had the Game Boy Colour version (enemy below?), that was pretty good. Reply +2
  • Breath of the Wild shows Nintendo is learning from PC games

  • redcrayon 16/03/2017

    @djkav
    That was also a one-off specific puzzle in a dungeon. What you couldn't do was walk into Lake Hylia wearing Iron Boots and tackle the Hylian Loach with a Hookshot at short range rather than fishing for fifty hours, which is the kind of logic that I imagine BotW would have sought to enable there. Having a set puzzle solution of that fire melts this ice is one thing (and OOT wasn't even the first Zelda game to do that), but it's not any more complex than room solutions like 'fire arrow lights lantern' or 'boomerang hits orb'. Attaching such elemental properties as 'flammable', 'choppable', 'explosive', 'meltable' or 'will fly in wind' to every item, weapon, enemy and detachable bit of scenery in the game is quite another.
    Reply +7
  • Why Nintendo Switch games are ending up more expensive

  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    @steveperrin
    Probably because bookshops aren't selling ~50% of e-readers when the most popular brand is from an online retailer and its app with the same function is free on most tablets anyway. Instead we've ended up with bookshops making their highest markup on hardbacks (I.e. special editions), merchandise and expensive kids books that have their own value outside of digital. That's why Game shops have half the shelf space given over to toys, accessories and clothing, they can't compete on price with online retailers but they can offer stuff that the digital stores can't.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    @UncleLou
    Even the most niche new Vita games still often go for 40 on Amazon (or at least 6 of the 8 games currently up for pre-order are), but I think that's down to them now being such small print runs aimed at such a tiny audience that they think they can get away with it.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    I agree with the thrust of the article- having their digital game have to pricematch the physical copy in Game is not going to go well for anyone, it's why I only ever buy digital games (from both the eshop and PSN) when heavily discounted. The card sizes and print run costs seem like a weighted tax against smaller devs making physical copies available, which won't help Nintendo, as the the fewer games that are available in shops, the less merchandising space Game is likely to devote to them.

    I disagree with this though:
    Mario Kart 8's port, which adds little, is 50
    Is it really just a port that adds little? That seems either a bit dismissive or poorly researched for the sake of a cheap (sorry) point. Battle mode on new arenas, 12-player lan races, local multiplayer out of the box, all the DLC included (48 tracks out of the box), new characters, new karts, more items, two-item-hold, drive assist (looks great if, like me, you have very little multiplayer buddies :D), plus other small additions like being able to brake while powersliding at 200cc. As a package that's hardly 'little' or a port with no thought gone into it. It's still a great buy and they've obviously put some effort into not just tailoring it to the Switch with some major additions for local multiplayer and family gaming, but also tweaking a couple of things too.

    I mean, I'm not usually one to go for remasters but when I pick up a Switch later this year I'll definitely grab this despite putting dozens of hours into the WiiU game. You can find it for 42 online which doesn't seem that unreasonable to me.
    Reply +3
  • Ghost Recon: Wildlands biggest launch of the year so far

  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    @MMV_Matt
    More young gamers reach the age where they can get into GTA etc all the time, even more so with word-of-mouth provided by YouTube for evergreen titles. The list of potential customers isn't just us old hands that have seen everything released back in the day with a jaded eye, that's how Mario DS was still selling new copies nearly a decade later. Although reading EG comments sometimes it's easy to think otherwise. :D
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    Comments on people's personal taste aside, I thought this was really well timed by Ubisoft. Four months after Overwatch, Destiny, Titanfall, Battlefield, Gears and CoD were splitting players between them, they release an open world, multiplayer, multiplat team shooter just as any of those playerbases are starting to emerge from a winter spent hunkered down over their rifles and looking for something new to play together. Meanwhile, single player adventure/action games are the ones fighting it out for a change.

    Presumably these figures are all the multiplat SKUs added together. Do we know if the PS4 SKU outsold Horizon?
    Reply 0
  • John Wick, Gateway, and my love for a good video game hub

  • redcrayon 13/03/2017

    Im disappointed, Donlan. There I was thinking you were going to draw a link between John Wick and the belated supermarket brand Gateway. Reply +7
  • The story of Crash magazine

  • redcrayon 12/03/2017

    @ShiftyGeezer
    Agree with you there, I've been saying for ages that various indie, portable and mobile titles get ignored when even a round-up of the cream of the crop every so often would be more than is offered now.
    Reply +2