redcrayon Comments

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  • Watch: What's the rarest Pokémon we can catch in 30 minutes?

  • redcrayon 16/07/2016

    @Aj64
    I'll have you know tedious list articles put together by the office junior were a thing in publishing long before Facebook existed. :D
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 16/07/2016

    I know its traditional for everyone to be as grumpy as possible in the comments, but this is getting a little silly. It's a lighthearted video for a Saturday in July. The sun is shining. Cheer up a bit.

    Besides, if you really are sick of Pokemon, Monster Hunter Generations is out this weekend if you want a game about long strings of commands and the cathartic skinning and wearing the corpses of brightly coloured monsters.

    Lagiacruz, I choose you! To be my new hat.

    @Johnny
    I think you should pitch to research which pubs in the UK have the best Pokemon. The Good Poke Guide, if you will. Or maybe that's an unfortunate title...
    Reply +16
  • The aim of Southern Rail Tycoon is to cancel all trains

  • redcrayon 15/07/2016

    As someone who commutes from Haywards Heath (just north of Brighton) to London every day on the same line, I feel your pain. I've just switched my annual commute to take the Thameslink instead, which, although run by the same company, actually has trains that turn up occassionally. Reply 0
  • Nintendo announces palm-sized mini NES console

  • redcrayon 14/07/2016

    Hypothetically, if they did a SNES version, I wonder if we'd get the nice JP/EU curved grey design, or the abomination that was the boxy US grey/purple one. Reply +7
  • Pokémon Go success prompts live-action movie chatter

  • redcrayon 13/07/2016

    @antmusic97
    EG have exhausted their content about Destiny for the moment, I'm sure normal
    service will resume in September.
    Reply 0
  • Holocaust museum pleads: stop playing Pokémon Go here

  • redcrayon 13/07/2016

    @SavageEvil
    I imagine they'd feel the same about any social media activity that involves waving cameras around and large groups talking about stuff that has no relevance to the place. Want to sit quietly and play Candy Crush or check your email while waiting for your pal at the place you agreed to meet? Fine. Want to turn up and talk loudly with twenty people while
    chasing AR creatures around an exhibition and clearly having no respect for the subject matter? Not cool.
    Reply +10
  • Monster Hunter: Generations review

  • redcrayon 12/07/2016

    @ElCobrito
    Yes it will. There is an option to lock the camera on large creatures (and switch between them if there are multiple ones present), and toggle it on and off on the touch screen. You can also control the camera manually, the bottom screen is customisable in terms of what you want there. I put in a total of 450 hours across the last two MH games on a 3DS XL, and found the lock-on tool absolutely fine. It's worse than dual analogue when trapped in a corner, but frees up your thumb a bit during frantic fights if all you're doing is keeping it trained on your target anyway. Pros and cons really.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 12/07/2016

    @benfosta
    I love Monster Hunter but I think it's a bit unrealistic to expect a journalist to put in more than 40 hours for the pittance they are being paid for the review. That's a full working week. 40 hours isn't enough to finish single player or even reach endgame of multiplayer, but it's more than enough to explore the hunting grounds and try out the weapons and new hunting arts on a variety of monsters, which is presumably what MH veterans want to know. I don't need to hear about the extra hours of grinding, I've lived that myself for several hundred hours, I wanted to know how the arts and hunter styles and new felyne mechanics change things up compared to MH4U.

    Having said that, if an EG staffer does get the bug and play all the way through, it would be great to read a more in-depth analysis in a month or two's time. It takes a long time to really delve into a MH game.
    Reply +11
  • redcrayon 12/07/2016

    lol the phantom negger returns. Somebody really doesn't like Monster Hunter. Reply +5
  • redcrayon 12/07/2016

    @jonathanharding-rath
    The single player and multiplayer campaigns are separate, but your character, weapons, armour and items stay the same. If you are struggling vs a monster in single player, tackling it with allies in multiplayer will show you some strategies and other weapons to use against it.

    Edit: seriously phantom negger? What is so controversial about this post? Try being a bit more subtle.
    Reply +4
  • Paedophiles, lures and susceptible children: the UK tabloids take on Pokémon Go

  • redcrayon 12/07/2016

    It's been a while since paedophiles were the scourge beloved of Daily Mail headline writers. I was expecting 'Will Pokemon Go cause a surge of immigration?', 'Will turning your home into a Pokemon Gym raise house prices?' or 'EU servers cause innocent Brit Pokemon to miss out' Reply +7
  • Pokémon Go is a phenomenon that's pushing people together

  • redcrayon 10/07/2016

    @Bernkastel
    She wasn't directly giving birth at that moment, there would have been at least half a dozen medical staff in the photo if so. When my daughter was born, we were in hospital for a full day before birth. I got through a book while my wife rested and spent longer buying coffee than it presumably takes to use that app for a couple of minutes, you can't be ready to leap into action every single moment.
    Reply +4
  • redcrayon 10/07/2016

    It'a weird that an app that encourages people to go outside, explore and interact has attracted comments on other sites regarding fears of the outside world. Considering how many people nearly get run over with their gaze firmly fixed looking at games or social media on their phones anyway, at least the app means that they might look up and around and talk to people once in a while. Reply +2
  • Evolve goes free-to-play, devs discuss "DLC s***storm"

  • redcrayon 07/07/2016

    @Kshandoo
    So how about those people who bought the game?
    To be fair, it's not uncommon for AAA games to be reduced to a fraction of the launch price a year after launch, and I don't see many complaining that the game they paid Ł50 for is well under Ł20 now. What the people who bought at launch get is more people to play with and continual servers running rather than it getting canned, so a significantly better player base than its meagre status now otherwise.
    Reply 0
  • Persona 5 coming to Europe - courtesy of Deep Silver

  • redcrayon 06/07/2016

    Count me in for SMT: A and 7th Dragon, that's made my day. Reply 0
  • redcrayon 06/07/2016

    @Lexxuk
    I think they meant no Vita version of P5.
    Reply +1
  • Twitch app lands on PlayStation Vita

  • redcrayon 05/07/2016

    @tomphillipsEG
    Seems a bit odd to mock Vita not getting any releases when you rarely review the games that do come out. Odin Sphere, Grand Kingdom, Adventures of Mana and Trails of Cold Steel were all great games that released this year, three of them in the last month. Could EG at least do the odd round-up of portable releases or something?
    Reply +15
  • Things fall apart: Looking back at Resident Evil 5

  • redcrayon 04/07/2016

    Played it through with a friend. We thought the final battles with Wesker were awful, with the warehouse fight in particular not very well signposted as to what you had to do, but the lab scene with all the lickers was a great callback.

    The bit in the swamp with the tribal spear-throwing zombies was a bit, er, odd. 'But the virus made them revert to being a primitive tribe!' seemed like a crap excuse to have enemies in loincloths and masks rather than torn modern clothing. It would have been better to have a different kind of fantastical enemy with a spear-type weapon because bio-mutant reasons than to use bio-mutant reasons to include a pretty outdated stereotype. I mean, RE has had bloody mutant sharks before, why go for something that has problematic overtones out of a misplaced sense of what's appropriate for the setting.
    Reply +1
  • Star Ocean: Integrity and Faithlessness review

  • redcrayon 02/07/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Fair points, thanks
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 02/07/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Just regarding Front Mission, what did you think of Front Mission Evolved? Misstep or more like where you would like to see it go?

    I'm thinking that Valkyria Chronicles was a great attempt at blending turn-based and action SRPGs, and I'd love to see Front Mission try a hybrid battle system like that. I like action games/RPGs where you only control one unit, but Front Mission has always been about squad-level command for me, for which I like to micromanage orders. I suppose a pause-to-issue-orders combined with strong AI might work? Hell, you could even have in-game 'drone' AI units as part of your squad that you
    have to program yourself! :-)
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 02/07/2016

    @brunoserra
    I'm looking forward to Ys VIII, SMTIV: Apocalypse and Trails of Cold Steel 2, there's quite a few that seem interesting to me coming up.

    Setsuna looks like a spiritual successor to Chrono Trigger, which is great as that's what many fans want, but I think assuming that the only chance a genre has for good games is to go backwards and ape it's glory days of 20 years ago seems a bit odd to me. The best JRPGs in the last decade or so (at least for me) have largely been the ones that didn't retread FF, DQ and CT, but to hear people like the writer talk you'd think such games didn't exist, thanks to an idea often repeated that JRPGs have never evolved and are still stuck in the mid-90s.

    It doesn't seem to matter that Xenoblade and even Final Fantasy have little in common with their forbears these days, or that the combat systems fans talk about are often the games by Atlus and Falcom as much as Square, or even that Square's Bravely Second is a great mix of new ideas streamlining a battle system of trade-offs, it's still CT and FFVI that get talked about as if practically every JRPG of the last few years hasn't tried something new with its mechanics. It would be like if every WRPG past Baldur's Gate and the original Fallout were ignored every time a comparison was made in the review of something like either The Witcher III or Xenoblade X, it's just silly, particularly for a games journalist.

    Somehow it's still ok to be unaware of current state of some genres when making sweeping comments about them. I suspect the unlikely occurance of a reviewer that claimed middling titles like Homefront: The Revolution being awful means that the FPS market hasn't changed or learned anything in the last decade, or that Bound in Flame (remember that?) meant that the modern WRPG market was crap, would attract a similarly baffled set of comments.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 01/07/2016

    In the last 9 months or so, Xenoblade X got a 'essential' badge from EG, and Tokyo Mirage Sessions and Bravely Default 2 were 'recommended'. I'm really unsure how Star Ocean says anything about the current state of JRPGs when even Eurogamer says there are several worth trying. Is it just that few of them are on PS4, or the writer doesn't play any of the good ones or something?

    Surely Xenoblade X would have been the comparison to make if you wanted to bring up an open world game, especially as it also uses a 'swords and sci-fi' setting.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 01/07/2016

    Not sure how the review uses Star Ocean as a barometer for JRPGs. It's like saying WRPGs sucked last gen because Two Worlds II was awful.

    There's plenty of great JRPGs this gen, they just tend to be on the portables rather than the PS4. Developers like Falcom and Atlus are the ones to watch these days, rather than Tri-ace, but EG didn't even bother to review Trails of Cold Steel.
    Reply +7
  • Zelda: Breath of the Wild needs to sell 2m copies to profit

  • redcrayon 30/06/2016

    @lylebot
    To be fair, virtually all the games press cover trade/dev issues as well as consumer ones, because readers are interested in it. If a 30-year-old flagship series doesn't sell enough to continue, then presumably it's fans will care alongside the bean counters at Nintendo towers. I mean, news about the comparative number of PS4s/XBOs sold, game charts from retailers, pre-order numbers and stories about the development and health of various major franchises don't directly impact customers either, but all get lots of comments too, so presumably attract readers. Games press have been part trade journos and part consumer-focused since the beginning.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 30/06/2016

    @Apostate
    Like many of their major first party games, they tend to notch up the sales over time rather than just fly off the shelves at launch. Being an NX launch title gives BotW the best possible chance of selling similar to previous home console Zeldas.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 30/06/2016

    @jambii267
    I imagine 2m isn't their sales 'target', just the point at which they need to reach to break even. I can't imagine they expect a project five years in the making to only pay for itself, rather than make a healthy profit on top. My guess would be they want 5m as a minimum, anything less than that and while it might be profitable, it will be making less than expectations considering the resources put into it.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 30/06/2016

    @Pirederas
    Do copies of the NX version sold in the months after release not count or something? You're basically saying that launch games won't sell any copies because of an install base that doesn't exist yet.

    Not to mention that Nintendo's first party games tend to have a comparatively long tail, and gradually notch up reasonable numbers over time. Some of the 'evergreen' launch titles like Mario 64 DS were still being shipped years after the 3DS replaced it.
    Reply +20
  • redcrayon 30/06/2016

    Looking at the reception it got at E3, I don't think 2m copies across WiiU and NX is going to be a problem. FFXV's '10m copies needed' is a bit more of a stretch, I think. Reply +73
  • Fatherhood isn't the shortcut to emotional complexity games wish it was

  • redcrayon 28/06/2016

    @dagas
    Good point. Agree that dad sims are also really about recognising the current average age of those buying western AAA titles, and the thing that might resonate with them the strongest. Romancing sixteen year old girls starts to feel a bit odd when you're pushing 40 and the wife keeps looking up from her phone with an eyebrow raised :-)

    Perhaps it's also about having close relationships in games that aren't all between people of the same peer group and first loves etc, which resonates with younger people more. Although I'd concede that your Uncle and cousin in P4 make it a nicely rounded view of life as a teenager too.

    Agree that P4 is brill though. isn't it ten years old now? Interested to see P5.
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 28/06/2016

    I've often thought that the trend for 'dad as violent protector' in computer games is a transitional step towards more emotional maturity in AAA games, as it's one that still allows the player to revel in violence while also providing them with a loose justification for it. It effectively allows the player to be both the powerful, skilled aggressor and also have a moral superiority of defending something good.

    Having said that, part of parenthood is preparing them for the world they will live in. While that means, for my daughter, similar stuff to what Nathan mentions in the article, if I was raising a child in the game worlds of TLOU, God of War or Dishonored, damn right I'd be teaching them to shoot straight in between sticking the bubble writing on the blood-spattered fridge! :D
    Reply +3
  • The new Monster Hunter feels like a best of Capcom's series, but it's not quite the best

  • redcrayon 27/06/2016

    As someone who only got into the series with Tri, I suspect much of generations might as well be new content to me. Looking forward to Aerial lance, it's MH Dragoon time! :-)

    Foraging as a cat sounds quite relaxing too when just looking for materials.
    Reply +2
  • The UK's two biggest video game magazine companies are now one

  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77
    Edge was the first part of games media to realise that there was a huge crossover between trade magazine interest (recruitment ads and general development articles) and consumer interest (news/reviews etc). You can see it on forums, games enthusiasts are much more interested in the trade side of things, and the day-to-day business of various large companies and publishers, than consumers of other media types.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @Cheeky-Girl-Gamer
    I still prefer the feel of print, but I don't buy anywhere near as many as I used to. Even then, the heavy discounts on subs by desperate publishers are probably why I still buy them- I doubt I'd pay Ł5 in the newsagents for them any more.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @ghostgate2001
    Super Play was fantastic, my brother and I would sit there and look at all the games we'd never get to play too!

    SNES games were expensive, and of the Japanese games from less common genres (at the time and in the UK) that came out over here, there are plenty that I love that I never would have even tried without Super Play raving about them. Secret of Mana and Legend of the Mystical Ninja spring to mind.

    The first Future mag I bought on a regular basis was Total! though- the reviews were long and I remember thinking it was much more informative than the official Nintendo mag of the time.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @Kasper_Finknottle
    Yeah, the No Mans Sky one was good too.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @matthewhaycock
    Thanks for that, much appreciated!
    Reply +1
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    @jabberwocky
    Few magazines focus on news these days. It's mostly news analysis, features, previews, reviews etc. I read EG for news most days, but the features in print mags tend to be longer and more in-depth.

    Even tablet mags aren't doing that well- encouraging advertisers to pay for space in either print or tablet editions is a tough ask these days. The magazine I work on has both a print and a tablet edition, and while the print edition's ad revenue is much less than it was a decade ago, the tablet yield is still a pittance in comparison.

    Did Edge stop doing their bespoke tablet edition with the animation etc? It was really nice, but I remember thinking at the time that they couldn't keep that up for long unless the tablet ad revenue picked up.
    Reply +5
  • redcrayon 23/06/2016

    Games TM is great, I've got a subscription to that. I'd rather keep that than Edge, which I cancelled years ago.

    Hopefully if they do close the magazine they'll actually let subscribers know rather than just swap the sub over to another one automatically, like some publishers have done with closed titles in the past.
    Reply +3
  • We played Zelda: Breath of the Wild four times and here's what we discovered

  • redcrayon 21/06/2016

    @-TheDarkSide-
    I always used to leave Zelda games/rpgs at the entrance to the next dungeon or town, to give me a fighting chance of jumping back in if I left the game for months.

    That was until I ended up saving at the entrance after having completed every quest relating to a town (one of the Star Ocean games, I think), returning months later to then spend ages interrogating everyone and wondering where the hell the questline was. These days I keep a notebook in the drawer by the telly, with pages of cryptic hints like 'try x next, speak to man in hat'. My wife was clearing it out one day and said it reads like a disjointed journal written by some half-crazed adventurer. She's probably right.
    Reply +4
  • The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the most ambitious Nintendo game in years

  • redcrayon 15/06/2016

    I love the idea that adventurers should wear warm clothes when heading to the mountains, after years of watching characters stroll into the snow wearing little more than sandals, a shirt and the same gear they investigate volcanos with. Reply +11
  • Homefront, Fire Emblem fail to dislodge Doom and Uncharted 4

  • redcrayon 23/05/2016

    Not really sure how Fire Emblem 'failed to dislodge' the AAA shooters from the top of the IK charts, I wouldn't have put it as a required objective for a niche strategy rpg on a portable in the UK to sit any higher than it did. Still, good to see Valkyria Chronicles up there too. Reply +4
  • What exactly is going on with the different versions of Fire Emblem Fates?

  • redcrayon 19/05/2016

    @pogomeister j
    That's correct: if you buy Birthright, then the Conquest and Revelations campaigns are effectively DLC expansions, and vice versa.
    Reply +1
  • EA dev chief initially rejected World War 1 setting for Battlefield

  • redcrayon 18/05/2016

    @goggyturk
    Exactly. I know its easy to cast executives as being corporate drones who just want to follow the money, but 'that doesn't sound like fun to play' seems a pretty reasonable concern for a games exec to me, and taking the time to play the demo and change his mind seems pretty fair too.
    Reply +2
  • redcrayon 18/05/2016

    @ramshot
    WWI wasn't all trench warfare, although that's understandably the lasting image of the western front to those of us in western Europe and the US (due to media coverage, Blackadder, the accounts of our soldiers who took part and the resonance of armistice day etc). The advances and retreats of the eastern front that defined the battles between central and eastern european factions raged back and forth over hundreds of miles.

    I'm not surprised that any westerner thinks it was all static trench warfare and thus not exactly suitable for run-and-gun and vehicle play as that's pretty much the general assumption.

    It's easy to see how complex conflicts become simplified to a single image over time though- you can see it with World War 2 often being cast as a battle of good vs evil or freedom vs dictatorship as it makes a simpler story than the various economic, political and territorial struggles that were also part of it. Same goes for the Crusades, where hundreds of years of warfare with huge periods of relative peace, dozens of factions and different campaigns with different goals all get summed up in a few sentences of narrative about Jerusalem and an image of western knights vs saracens.

    Makes me wonder how the last 25 years of western action in the middle east will eventually be all thrown together and branded as a single entity, no matter the different goals and objectives of actions taken years and hundreds of miles apart.
    Reply +9
  • Homefront: The Revolution review

  • redcrayon 17/05/2016

    @Sheetbike
    The only thing that 'Nork' seems to discriminate against is the invading force, and correct English due to the military need to shorten a four-syllable faction title when under fire. That shorthand then presumably catches on. If it was an invading Uzbekistan army, (for the sake of a four-syllable, non-western country name), I'm not sure that the defenders shortening it to ''the Uzbeks' would be racist and a racial slur rather than a shorthand of convenience. Two factions being of different ethnicities and bitter enemies doesn't automatically make catchy battlefield shorthand for a long country name racist. Feels like you're reaching a bit here when there's plenty of other crap to call the game out on. If anything, I think 'Nork' is fairly polite for a term to describe a comically evil totalitarian invading force. Pretty sure there were also much nastier names for invading German forces in WWII than the relatively benign 'the gerries '.

    I'm also concerned at the lack of gags regarding the use of Aus/UK slang for breasts. Come on EG, what are we paying you for? Oh... Sorry. Carry on ;-)
    Reply +13
  • Combat fatigues: How Uncharted is a walking simulator in action game's clothing

  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @SpaceInvader2
    I think that the opening of 'isn't this adventure story setup of white bloke killing baddies and spunky journo girl generic' is only to offer a counterpoint to the next thousand words of praise for its pacing.

    If he had mentioned Drake's race in isolation as a 'white guy= bad' thing I'd be criticising
    the article too, but he didn't- it's been pulled out of context when what he was talking about was the generic airport thriller (a genre of books almost exclusively featuring white bloke adventurers) feel of the characters. To be honest, even then I think Naughty Dog did it on purpose- if you want to make a successful pulp adventure series, I can hardly blame them for borrowing the template those stories have followed and sold tens of millions of books and cinema tickets on the back of for nearly a century.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @Sedoi
    The article doesn't claim Uncharted is 'bland', 'just because' the protagonist is white and male, you've just read that into it. The article claims that Uncharted's setup, and it mentions lots of things other than Drake's skin colour and gender like killing baddies, Elena's personality, their attractiveness etc, is generic. Which is true for adventure stories, as I pointed out- I must read at least a dozen of those kinda pulp thrillers a year when travelling and characters like Drake and Elena are pretty much the default. You saying 'it really doesn't matter' hardly rebuts my point.
    Reply +3
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @Sedoi
    If you'd have read the article past the first paragraph, you'd realise that's not the point it's making at all.
    Reply 0
  • redcrayon 13/05/2016

    @NeoTechni
    I'm struggling to see the racism in the article. It calls Uncharted's setup generic for having Drake and Elena as a globetrotting handsome/pretty white couple, but in the context of adventure/action games/films/books/stories that is about as genre-common or 'generic' a setup as you can get. Seriously, go into a bookshop and look at the thrillers/action/adventure books, you'll see the shelves full of Cussler, Ludlum, Child and loads more, virtually all of which feature a leading white bloke who is an experienced traveller and familiar with combat, usually paired with a smart, slightly younger white woman with a more academic skillset.

    It's not racism to acknowledge that setup has been the template for characters in action/adventure/genre fiction since Penguin made paperbacks popular. It's not just about how they look, it's a popular storytelling template because it gives a complete adventurous skillset of street smarts, adapting to exotic locations easily, existing contacts, investigative, academic and combat ability, plus a certain amount of vulnerability and romantic tension, all with just two characters.

    Like all tropes/cliches, it doesn't mean it's a bad thing on an individual basis, it's just visable when looking at the template for adventure stories as a whole. A bit like with games, where there's absolutely nothing wrong with having a white bloke with brown hair and a gun as your lead character, but when everyone did it, it started to look a bit silly.
    Reply +6
  • Ace Attorney 6 set for a western release this September

  • redcrayon 12/05/2016

    @Binba442
    Civ 6 got a pun and Ace Attorney didn't? ;-;
    Wright Anything.
    Reply 0