kangarootoo Comments

Page 1 of 310

  • Chinese government reveals censorship rules for console games

  • kangarootoo 23/04/2014

    "We want to open the window a crack to get some fresh air"

    That is an oddly (and perhaps unintentionally) honest way for a Chinese official to describe the situation.
    Reply +16
  • Return to Skyrim

  • kangarootoo 18/04/2014

    Though the machinery of Skyrim is an improvement (skills in particular), I always fond Oblivion the more involving game. The scenery alone had more variety, and you could always tell which part of the continent you were in just by looking around you, but also the main and side missions just had more charisma. In Skyrim I often felt I had too many missions on the go, few of which stirred any strong emotions. Oblivion was the only game in which I got every achievement. Skyrim was the game that had too much snow, and far too many steep inclines to make random travelling fun.

    I don't want to sell Skyrim short, it is an excellent game, just not the best ES game overall.

    The exceptions to this was the Oblivion gate levels, which were roundly awful.
    Reply +2
  • Veteran Halo composer fired from Bungie "without cause"

  • kangarootoo 16/04/2014

    @SpaceMidget75

    I though that in the US you would just pay someone off if you didn't need them anymore, without being legally required to give a reason. I may be wrong, but I didn't think that permanent jobs in the US gave the legal security that they usually do in Europe.
    Reply +2
  • "We're not evil villains building an empire"

  • kangarootoo 14/04/2014

    @MrMattAdz

    Well ok, that is true.

    Give me a minute.

    Hey philolog65, what do you know about how MrMattAdz reads acronyms? Yeah, I know, he reads them incorrectly because they are acronyms, not words, but whaddeva!

    There we go, all fixed.
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 14/04/2014

    @MrMattAdz

    Well you explained the reasoning in your head, but given that you were calling philolog65 a moron without asking him how he reads acronyms, I'm not sure it really explains your actions.

    Besides which, regardless of your reasoning, "you only put 'an' if it's before a vowel" is simply wrong.

    Look, none of it matters really. I'm just saying that if you are going to go all grammar nazi on someone, you better make sure your case is watertight. You called philolog65 out, I called you out. To start the whole 'this is a gaming site, I didn't think an in-depth.... blah blah blah' approach is disingenuous. Your statement about a and an relating to vowels was wrong, so take it on the chin as a lesson learned. It's much more dignified :)
    Reply +2
  • kangarootoo 14/04/2014

    @MrMattAdz

    "You're a moron, you only put 'an' if it's before a vowel"

    Ummmm, no. No you don't.


    "An hotel" is the correct way to refer to 'a' hotel, as proper English requires that the H be silent.

    Though in your case, you are sort of confusingly wrong and right at the same time. You say that it should be a as an only preceeds a vowel, and yet F2P is an acronym, phonetically pronounced 'efftoopee', which starts with a vowel.

    An effigee.
    A frog.
    See?


    One might suggest that if you're going to call someone a moron, you should do your homework before you start.


    Edit: good work on the apostrophe use though :)
    Reply +4
  • kangarootoo 14/04/2014

    "I think that many hardcore gamers enjoy the fact that their mothers or their girlfriend or people around them are starting to play this game"

    What if your girlfriend and mother* have been playing more core, non-ftp games for years already, you patronising nob?




    * the Bill Hicks fan in me feels the need to point out that this is not one person :)
    Reply +2
  • The legendary Atari E.T. dump is being excavated in two weeks

  • kangarootoo 13/04/2014

    @Nibbles

    Pitfall 2 surely. It was an epic adventure for its time.
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 11/04/2014

    I'm not sure what the story is supposed to be here. The entire history of this game, and the industry that surrounded it at the time, is known. As far as I know, there isn't even any question over whether the cartridges are there. So they go into the desert, dig them, look at them and go "Yep, there they are". Then they melt them down and make plastic chairs out of them or something. Reply 0
  • I never want to play Shenmue 3, Half-Life 3 or The Last Guardian

  • kangarootoo 12/04/2014

    The problem is one of expectation. We can all thinks of games that sneaked under our radar, and then turned out to be amazing (Crackdown would be one such example for me), and we all know of games that were all pumped up fir, which turned out to be awful.

    Expectation often does one of two things to people - it makes them ultra dissappointed with things that are quite passable (if Prometheus was 'just some scifi film', people would judge it much less harshly), or their emotional investment makes them blid to glaring faults (Duke Nukem Forever, come on down).

    I am totally looking forward to certain games that are on the horizon, but my very best gaming moments (such as playing and finishing a game in one marathon day whilst visiting a university friend years back, a game I'd never heard of before, a game called Half Life) are always unexpected. Alpha Protocol is not the best game on the planet, but I expected absolutely nothing from it, and so it was a continual gift. Kingdoms of Amalur was another zero expectation game I'd never heard of, but after getting it free on Ps+, I discovered a generic but well built RPG that got hours and hours of my time. There are others I'm sure, as I'm sure there are for everyone here.

    In the end, hype and anticipation, and longing (which is what we are really talking about here), aren't always good things. Make hay whilst the sun shines, as the saying goes.



    Homework assignment. List the games that just came out of nowhere, for which you had zero expectations, (or hadn't even heard of) but that ended up impressing you.
    Reply +6
  • "Gritty, uncompromising" RPG Prisonscape on Kickstarter

  • kangarootoo 11/04/2014

    @Morte-360

    I'm sorry, but the old "my opinion is as valid as anyone else's" is just noise. If you really want to know what I think you should do (and of course you don't, and that is excellent, because I actually don't want you to change your mind on how you feel about the art - honestly, I don't much like it either)... I'd simply want you to be constructive, as always.

    My point is that you stated quite clearly the art style is wrong, you said it three times, but didn't attempt to add anything constructive. You could have written "I don't like the art style", which would have said just as much, but would have saved you some typing time (and would also have meant I wouldn't be all on your case like some internet opinion police force ;) )


    However, you didn't. You even went so far as to say "So why not use a different art style?"

    But surely if all we are doing is kicking about subjective preferences, the answer would have to be "Because there is no reason to use a different art style". You gave an opinion, but not a reason. Your subjective opinion on the art style is absolutely legitimate, but to suggest they should change it on that same basis is not.

    Anyway, as you were. Don't think I don't realise I am making way bigger a deal of this than it warrants (I've started so I'll finish, sort of thing). Have a good weekend :)
    Reply +1
  • kangarootoo 11/04/2014

    @Morte-360

    "The retro graphics in that video don't do that"

    Says who? This is completely subjective.

    You say in three different ways that the art style is wrong for this game, but if someone says to you "No, you're wrong, the art style does fit the game, does suit the game, and does improve the game's appeal" how do you respond?
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 11/04/2014

    This article is very unusual in its tone, petulant one might even say.



    "$49,500 in total, which sounds like a lot"

    If you consider wages alone, a 5 month release schedule, and four people developing this, that boils down to $2500 a month each before tax if they work on it full time.

    There will of course be loads of costs beyond just wages. So how do you consider the asking amount to be a lot? What are you basing that on?



    "Prisonscape is made by a team of four, none with standout video gaming pasts, but with experience nonetheless."

    You got a source link for the background of each of the four devs? Anyone who has spent any time actually developing games can tell you that great people can work on bad projects, and that basing your assessment of a person on the games they have released is incredibly naive. The whole comment smacks of belligerence, like you wanted to say something negative about the pedigree of the people involved, but couldn't really as there was no basis, so you were just childish and rude about them instead.



    By this point in my post, it is worth pointing out I don't know any of the devs, have never heard of the project before, have no reason to defend them other than what I just read in this article. I have to admit that when I first looked at this, I thought "not interested", and frankly that is still the case. The game is not for me. However, the tone of this article is bizarre. There seems to no basis for the negativity, which leads one to believe there is something else going on. Either Rob knows these devs and has a reason to dislike this project, or he is having a bad day and is being a dick for that reason, or something else I can't account for. Critical exploration is absolutely part of the job, and there is something maybe to be said for devs making Kickstarter their first port of call 'go to guy' when it comes to funding (a larger discussion that warrants some time and effort), but this whole article is just childish, nothing more or less. No critique, just observation followed by sneer, followed by observations, followed by sneer. I have never seen coverage of a Kickstarter project on EG that reads like this one, a seemingly unjustified kick in the balls for devs looking to stay in business. Care to explain?
    Reply +15
  • Transistor, the next game from the creators of Bastion, is out next month

  • kangarootoo 10/04/2014

    I enjoyed Bastion a lot, and I'll say it for the 40th time - best video game soundtrack ever.

    On first look, I did think this looked very similar to Bastion, but maybe only in the base mechanics. Consider me interested.
    Reply 0
  • The Breakout: A point-and-click game with player freedom

  • kangarootoo 10/04/2014

    @Shinetop

    Yeah, I mean it won't rock your world, but it definitely felt the most like BS1 and 2 since... BS 1 and 2.

    The 3D character art and animations do look different at times, but their treatment works pretty well and is likely as close as you could get to the original hand drawn characters. And all the backdrops are hand drawn, and completely nail that original feeling.

    The puzzles and conversations are mostly back on track too, again feeling much more like the 'proper' Broken Sword games we remember, along with some new more technical (drag this wire here, cut this wire, shuffle those tiles, etc) puzzles that I think fit very well.

    I played 3, but didn't finish it, and also didn't bother with 4 (which I think might have been better than 3). Taste is subjective, but 5 (episode 1, episode 2 to follow this month hopefully) is so cheap it is worth a look.
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 10/04/2014

    I love good point and click games. I've gotten quite into Broken Sword 5 recently, which is almost on a par with 1 and 2 (and considerably better than the ones in between). Waiting for the episode 2 release.

    I don't really play them on PC anymore though. Mobile tablets are the perfect device for such things, and so an iOS version of this would be much appreciated (stretch goal?).
    Reply +4
  • Epic Games' Fortnite reappears in new footage

  • kangarootoo 10/04/2014

    @peeps

    Yeah, I'm not doing down FTP as a concept. I think it can be done well, or badly, just like traditional full price games can be done well or badly.

    I personally do tend to stay away from FTP (at least on my iPad), as I know that the game model will be different. Sometimes it can still be a lot of fun to play for free (Dead Trigger, for example), but thus far the balance isn't right.

    Further examples can be found in game series that started priced, and then went FTP. Where's My Water, Cut The Rope, Flight Control, all games that started with a flat fee and were amazing, but had sequels that were FTP and bloody awful as a result (Cut The Rope 2 is actually very good, but only after they patched in a tweak to reduce the impact of the FTP model).

    The Drowning is another example. What could have been a great and beautiful shooter, utterly killed by bad FTP mechanics. Yes I was able to try it for free and make up my mind, but if it had not been FTP the experience I "tried" would have been completely different, and I may well have ended up buying.
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    @peeps

    "Think of it as trying before you buy"

    No, that is the wrong way to think about FTP. FTP is an approach to design. It is not just about how the player experiences the game, it is about how the game is built.

    The priorities are different. A full price game is designed to give a strong player experience, resulting in good reviews, high initial sales, additional sales from word of mouth, and commitment to sequel purchase.

    A FTP game is designed to make money from the player, as part of their play experience. It is fundamental to the success of any FTP game.


    I'm not saying that all FTP games are bad, or that this title will be bad. I am just saying that viewing FTP as "try before you buy" is wholly inaccurate.
    Reply +2
  • Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel confirmed for PC, PS3 and Xbox 360

  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    @Pandy

    A strangely successful fool, it would seem.

    And for every pinch of salt his words require, I'd apply a bucket for any internet expert.

    He is simply saying that there are not yet enough next gen owners to make it worth their while working on a cross platform Borderlands.

    For all their waffle, and name calling, nobody has yet given a compelling counter case to that stance.
    Reply -1
  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    @LetsGo

    If that is the case, how on earth do you explain Randy Pitchford saying what he is saying? Has he simply gone mad?


    "If you try to image the set of Borderlands players who have already upgraded, that's not 100 per cent. But if you try to image the set of Xbox One or PS4 owners who do not have an Xbox 360 or a PS3, the difference there is so close to nil you can't make a business rationalisation around that."


    You can't just say "but it's wrong" without accounting for the words of the guy in charge of making Borderlands in the first place. It is kind of his business to know these things, and he has solid numbers to back up his words.
    Reply -1
  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    @pauldouglas

    "I think he's forgetting there's a crucial and significant market of Next-Gen adopters who will not willingly go back to buying new games for their previous generation hardware."

    I'm not sure he has forgotten it, so much as it just not being very relevant.

    He has said quite plainly, the number of BL fans who haven't upgraded yet greatly outweighs the number that have, so for a franchise like borderlands, next gen owners (of which I am one) AREN'T crucial or significant, not yet. That is rather of his point.
    Reply +1
  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    "If you try to image..."

    Excuse me?
    Reply +6
  • The Last of Us: Remastered for PS4 revealed

  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    \o/ Reply +57
  • $499 Virtuix Omni VR treadmill shipping September

  • kangarootoo 09/04/2014

    @Furnace-Inferno

    The question asked by a previous poster was "How do you strafe?". Whatever you mean by strafing in a video game context, your answer to their question wasn't helpful "The same way you would in real life, aka very slowly").

    I was simply pointing out that this device supports strafing already, at normal movement speeds, simply by the fact that it lets you move in one direction and shoot in another. Call that pedantic if you will.

    :)
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 08/04/2014

    @Furnace-Inferno

    "Strafing is really only something you do in videogames it would be completely retarded in real life."

    No, not really.

    Strafing in video games is an abstraction designed to work in a way that reduces the animation demands placed on an avatar. Strafing in real life is just running one way whilst looking/pointing in another (something that happens all the time on any sports pitch.

    That is what strafing actually is, moving in one direction whilst facing in another - not the torso locked forwards whilst sliding sideways thing that happens in video games.

    In fact this is why the answer to the original question is "it automatically supports strafing, because it allows you to move in one direction whilst facing in another direction". Whether a given game supports such things in its character rig is another question.
    Reply +6
  • 1999 adventure Outcast is getting remade, pending Kickstarter campaign

  • kangarootoo 07/04/2014

    Outcast was an absolute star of a game. Stunning looking, but also deep. I'd love to see it brought up to date. It is exactly the kind of game one likes to revisit, but the original is just too old for that now now. I wish them the best with this. Reply +8
  • The numbers game

  • kangarootoo 05/04/2014

    Those people among you who complain when review scores are + or - one point from your expectation, you're part of the problem. Reply +3
  • Uncharted director Amy Hennig joins Visceral Games

  • kangarootoo 03/04/2014

    Excellent news. Reply +2
  • A Light in Chorus is the prettiest game you've never heard of

  • kangarootoo 02/04/2014

    @clarkwgriswold

    I can think of something worse, an over-sensitive response.
    Reply +2
  • EA apologises for Frostbite's "stupid" anti-Nintendo April Fool

  • kangarootoo 02/04/2014

    @menage

    I saw a National Trust one about putting Stone Henge forward an hour for summer, by moving one of the stones.

    I quite liked that one. I am clearly getting very old :)
    Reply +70
  • kangarootoo 02/04/2014

    @Faramis

    "I found it funny, whoever posted it deserves a raise."

    I'm not sure you quite understand what business the Frostbite devs are in.
    Reply +50
  • Peter Molyneux's Godus problem

  • kangarootoo 01/04/2014

    @penhalion

    It was quite a provocative interview, and probably not the first he has had. Under pressure people get defensive and say daft things. I bet he is looking back at the one you quoted in particular, and sighing with regret.
    Reply -1
  • kangarootoo 01/04/2014

    "Maybe the dog in Fable, that was a feature that was like that. The development team on Fable 2 said we don't want a f***ing dog, we want a dragon, but I said no, and I was universally hated in the studio for a while."

    Good for you, they were completely wrong.

    Sometimes you have to stick to you guns. I recall an anecdote I heard recently about Naughty Dog doing a screening type test of LoU, and one of the complaints was that people didn't like the end. So they ignored them and stuck to their guns because that was worked for the story. In the end, it was the right choice, you can't always ask an opinion before something is complete. Consensus is sometimes just another word for benign. Better to impress the socks off a bunch of people than hit the edge of target with everybody.
    Reply +11
  • Game jam reality show cancelled as indies wouldn't put up with its s***

  • kangarootoo 01/04/2014

    @Ext

    The thing that has been negged down is not 'gender discussion', it is a misrepresentation of the subject at hand.

    The implication was that 'observation of the natural differences between the genders' is somehow a defence for suggesting a game programmer is worse at game programming, simply because she is a woman. This is patent nonsense, and not at all 'realistic sense' as you suggest.

    Supporting the discussion of provocative subjects is not the same as removing the bar for quality of argument and observation. A badly made case, based on incorrect observations, should always be treated as such.
    Reply +12
  • kangarootoo 01/04/2014

    @Apaar

    I'm not quite sure what point you are making. You talk about "observations of the typical behaviour of the sexes". You surely aren't suggesting that a woman being worse at her job than a man (as was implied by the Pepsi dickhead) is a 'typical behaviour of the sexes'. Are you? Are you?


    That some behavioural differences between genders exist, has nothing to with the actual questions that were asked - which referenced only the effect of gender on professional ability.

    The guy asked if having a woman on your team is a disadvantage. If you think that by asking that question he was somehow breaking ground in human studies, ground so profound that he himself didn't even realise how profound he was being, you are deluded.

    It wasn't bold, it was simply dense.
    Reply +13
  • Hitman: Absolution and Deadlight are April's Games with Gold offerings

  • kangarootoo 31/03/2014

    Yes you need XBL Gold, but the games are above and beyond what Gold has always provided. So perhaps rather than free, a better term would be 'complimentary', like the salt and vinegar in a chip shop...........

    .....except salt and vinegar is better than Hitman Absolution.
    Reply -1
  • Surprise Bravely Default success sparks Square Enix rethink

  • kangarootoo 31/03/2014

    I can't count the number of conversations about how taking a game that has niche appeal, and changing it to try and force mass market sales, can put into competition with other games against which you stand no chance.

    Better to have 90% of a small dedicated audience, than 0.5% of a global one that don't even know who you are.

    Well done SqEnix, for at least finally coming around to this. Many wouldn't have done.
    Reply +12
  • Who is DayZ creator Dean Hall?

  • kangarootoo 31/03/2014

    @Bertie

    "but I think it's unfair to paint the article as just focusing on that"

    I don't want to labour the point, but I'm afraid I thought the article did just focus on that. The only time Day Z featured, is when it was stalled by the stuff that was going on in his life.

    I think this sentence kind of sums things up - "because to many people, me included, Dean Hall is DayZ". For a great many people, that isn't true, and neither should it be. There are people out there making great games every day, and don't feel the need to be as well known or famous as their product (I'm not assuming that Mr Hall wants the fame in this case, rather than being given it, but I suspect he does).


    I think you are being given a bit of a hard time about this article. Maybe people are being unreasonable, but I think also if you read it back you might think the tone was a bit off target. These things are subjective, but when I read a sentence like "Hall packed a satellite modem so he could work on the game from base camp, costing him a fortune (as did the trip, incidentally)", I think 'am I supposed to feel some kind of sympathy because someone's adventurous holiday cost them a lot of money?' 'Cos if that was at all the implication, the tone is wrong.

    Anyway, I'm done bashing the article :)
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 29/03/2014

    What an unusual article. I guess there is an audience for it.

    Nothing whatsoever against the man, or his work. I'm just not very interested in celebrity. I'm interested in games, the playing of games, the making of games. I'm not remotely interested in hearing about someone who climbed a mountain, or got ill because he ate his lunch for breakfast. I'm reading Eurogamer, not Upworthy.



    And this is going to seem particularly bitchy, but who on earth has a nickname of 'Rocket'? Seriously. I wanted to be called Rocket once, when I was 4. True story.
    Reply 0
  • Threes dev reacts to clones with 42K word blog post

  • kangarootoo 29/03/2014

    @penhalion

    "I know that's harsh but, the way it was cloned so easily speaks volumes for the perceived and implied complexity vs the actual complexity of the game."

    I'm not sure you've really thought this through. Cloning, copying, you know what those words mean right? If someone else already did the hard work, and you then copy them making minor adjustments, your job will be completed more quickly...... because they did all the hard work already.


    Inherited knowledge. Seriously, it is the same principle reason that we're not still living the bronze age. HOW can you not see that?
    Reply +3
  • Watch Dogs graphics look better in the latest trailer

  • kangarootoo 28/03/2014

    @UkHardcore23

    Because following a link or downloading a standalone file is a pain in the arse compared to simply selecting 1080p in a drop down menu and pressing the full screen button?
    Reply +3
  • This is what The Amazing Spider-Man 2 video game looks like

  • kangarootoo 28/03/2014

    This looks a lot like an upgrade the web swinging mechanic in Spiderman 2 on XBox, which was AMAZING! Immediately interested in this. Reply +6
  • Digital Foundry vs. inFamous: Second Son

  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    @grassyknoll

    "gameplay analysis has no place in a Digital Foundry piece"

    I totally agree, but be honest, that isn't entirely what you said.
    Reply +5
  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    @grassyknoll

    If Richard Leadbitter had actually written the article... your comment would still be childish trolling. Stop being so angry.
    Reply -6
  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    @Syrette

    Whilst DF article can be about whatever DF want them to be about, it would be rather ill advised not to consider the tastes and expectations of the readership if they still want the page hits.

    Pilot Magazine could start writing about Golf if they wanted, but their article read count would drop as a result.
    Reply +11
  • Goat Simulator's launch trailer is a work of cinematic genius

  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    "We're only eliminating the crash-bugs, everything else is hilarious and we're keeping it" - they've cracked game development crunch right there :) Reply +2
  • UK video game tax breaks approved

  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    The rules are littered with reference to "or set in an undetermined location", so a Beyond Good and Evil sequel developed by in the UK by Eskimos could qualify with flying colours....

    ..which is excellent news, as tax breaks for UK devs are a good idea but requiring games be 'more British' is a bloody silly one.
    Reply +10
  • The Last of Us headed to PS4 this summer, Sony employee says

  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    @mixindave

    Cross buy only works with digital purchases I thought?

    That said, my version of AC4 is the upgrade path, where the PS4 version cost me 10 but it needs the PS3 disc to be in the drive. That approach would certainly be nice :)
    Reply +2
  • Oculus Rift: Step into the game, step out with two billion dollars

  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    Another thought just occurred to me, not directly related to the discussion about Kickstarter.

    Whenever Facebook change something, and people don't like it, (besides continuing to use Facebook, whilst waffling loudly on about how they are 'thinking about leaving Facebook', like some relationship junky with no self esteem) they often complain about how Facebook is neglecting the needs of its customers.

    And then someone has to remind them they are not the customer, they are the product. Facebook is free at the point of use, and advertising is what pays for it all. The companies funding the advertising are the customers, the eyes of the user (including my own) are the product. Awkwardly, the same applies to Eurogamer (sorry).

    I really hope Occulus remains a paid product, with an appropriately high price tag, so that whoever owns one remains the customer.
    Reply 0
  • kangarootoo 27/03/2014

    @arcam
    The examples you cite are limited in scope, but I don't mean to dismiss them so glibly, there are of course always exceptions.

    However, in every example the developer has chosen to give specific options to the backers, which is not what I was talking about. A vote on a specific feature is manageable by the developer, entirely of their choosing (part of their marketing drive if you will), and a normal part of many development cycles. That isn't the same as the broad "we gave you money, we should get a say" attitude that some people were voicing.

    In other words, if in each of your examples the developer had not chosen to offer those specific backer options, for them to make that decision that would have been the correct course. They got to choose, we didn't, which is as it should be.
    Reply 0