grassyknoll Comments

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  • What does Brexit mean for the UK video games industry?

  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @BobbyDeNiro We don't need to move on, the referendum has already crippled the economy in day & is not legally binding. Every single Leave vote set fire to 5000 of our countries money on Thursday. That is not something that will be forgotten.

    I would also add that we shouldn't forget Nigel Farage's word on a result 48 / 52, it would be "unfinished business".
    Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @riceNpea HAHAHAHAHA! Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Gemini42_ Some of your quotes to other posters, all different I might add just over the last 2 weeks:

    "You'll no doubt take that as some kind of "victory", but the reality is I just don't want to continue to converse with an asshole."

    "Well look what the cat dragged in. Still waiting on the side lines waiting to pounce I see. Glad I didn't disappoint in providing you with some fresh wanking material you massive twat. :lol:"

    "Sounds like Kanevil was his usual vile, unpleasant self taking things too far."

    You go round acting like you own the site & antagonize anyone who disagrees with you. Nothing I said warranted insults. Maybe a little self reflection wouldn't go a miss, because you really are a bully.
    Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Gemini42_ Your tone seems very pointed right now. Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @spamdangled Well, the referendum isn't legally binding & it was all about him being prime minister, which is a certainty. I just can't imagine him back tracking, but this promises have basically disappeared. It's chaos. Reply -2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    I would love the average IQ's of those who voted. Reply -2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @spamdangled It's ridiculous. They've basically outright lied to the public. This is the very opposite of the democratic process. The amusing thing is posters are defending the policies of the Leave campaign from yesterday, Leave is basically Remain with an economic & constitutional crisis as a bonus today. It was pointless. Reply -2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    http://www.harmonycentral.com/forum/filedata/fetch?id=30947372&type=thumb

    One particular poster
    Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @spamdangled "Simply put, many of the people who voted Leave were lied to. A lot of them have now realized that, and have expressed regret that they didn't vote to Remain.

    Daily Mail readers are losing their shit too. Their comments on that site are hilarious. Literally hundreds of people saying "wait, so the Remain campaign was telling the truth after all and the Leave campaign were lying?"

    Obviously situations change so not all political manifestos can be fulfilled, but the leave campaign is basically dropping its pledges within 48 hours (free market movement, extra spending etc), if anything is to be learnt from this mess is manifestos should be analysed be a independent executive to determined it's viability and be legally binding. This kind of politics cannot be allowed to continue.
    Reply -3
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @mega-gazz With the added benefit of destroying your pension & increasing the cost of your mortgage. Not in a awful way, but not one poster has given a viable reason for leave bar "controlling your own country". It's honestly beyond stupid & the UK is a laughing stock and Northern Ireland & Scotland will be gone in a few years. Leave voters can't say anything about Trump, because he's the US Boris. Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Hellotherenow "The mps kept on saying that the UK public should of listened to the experts, being economist's and analyst's. Lol yeah right, that's why so called video games expert analyst Michael Pachter is wrong 100% every time."

    People like you are the problem.
    Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @mega-gazz It's not worth going over, but in 5 years time austerity will be worst, immigration will be the same if not higher & those who are poorest will be hit harder. This new found independence benefits the wealthy only. Reply -2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @burgstar You're purposely trying to find something to be offended about. You probably don't have a mortgage, a pension, have children or plan to emigrate but those of us that do are going to be paying far more & have far low opportunities. Like it or not, free movement of labour is the foundation of an modern economy, you don't have it then it collapses. It's just delaying the evitable.

    "A message to our uk political class that they need to start listening more"

    HAHAHAHAHA

    http://img07.deviantart.net/6bf1/i/2009/324/f/8/burning_money__by_roxasrocks0813.jpg
    Reply -3
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Malacath Social housing has dropped from 200,000 to less than 10,000 per annum when it should have been increasing, that's the government failing, not a EU failing. If you government build more houses with taxation then your wouldn't have an issue with house prices as they would fall accordingly. Reply -2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @burgstar I honestly don't know what's wrong with you. Older people & northern towns (which I live in one) predominately voted leave, these voters were driven by immigration worries. Half of immigration is the UK can be stopped immediately by the UK government. This mantra of "making Britain great" again & controlling borders while every single academic is saying what a disaster it will be is anti intellectualism at its core. Brexit is the UK's Trump moment. Reply +2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Malacath If your government is building less houses (basically zero) while the immigrant population is increasing & contributing more in taxes than they're using in services, then the group that's failed you is the UK government, not the EU. I'm kind of astonishing you don't understand this.

    If an organiser sold 200 tickets to a concert & only had 150 capacity venue, you wouldn't blame the ticket buyers for that would you?
    Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Dopedrop The UK could have halved immigration 2 days ago, which so many posters seem to have forgotten. The most ironic thing about this situation is immigration is going to have to go up dramatically to fill in the economy black hole we now have. Leave voters who voted because of immigration have made their own lives worst for nothing. Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Malacath "Try being unable to buy or rent a house due to the population explosion that is caused by uncontrolled immigration."

    That's nothing to do with immigration, that's because successive governments have reduced house building from 200k a year to basically zero over a 30 year period. That's a failure of government, not the EU.

    "This and the fact that hospitals can't cope is the main reason for anti-immigration sentiment."

    Immigrants contribute more to the economy than they take, this is once again a failure of government to spending money on schools & the NHS (to privatised it) they received through taxation.

    You've literally given your power to the people fucking you over. Jesus.
    Reply +2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @Wander Actually, there's multiple things we do know:

    1. Scotland & especially Northern Ireland's position in the UK becomes untenable not being part of the EU, so they'll both be having referendums in the next 2 / 3 years.

    2. The financial & construction industries will not be developing here for years with so much uncertainty, with many banks most certainly leaving. We may not even have trade agreements after 2 years post article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

    3. UK scientific research has an excess of over 4 billion pounds over the last 6 years, which will now be a black hole.

    4. Moody has reduced out credit rating because of said uncertainty meaning we're now going to be paying more money for the same debt.

    5. Because of the collapsing pound, goods & services with other nations is going to cost us 6% more currently (& will be lower in the future), basically meaning businesses shredding staff or closing, ergo...

    6. Higher employment

    7. And lastly the double whammy of increased interest rates combined with spiraling house prices. You'll also be paying higher rents if you don't own.

    8. Lower pensions because of the loss of the triple lock.

    To say we don't know what's going to happen is a joke.
    Reply +3
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @burgstar Jesus Christ, you really are not reading my posts properly at all. I'll keep this simple: Not all leave voters are racist, but all racists voted leave. Now we can pretend the BNP, EDL, UKIP, Britain's First, didn't endorse Brexit, but they did. Between them they have millions of supporters that lead to the leave shift. Demographically their supporters are predominantly older people or in social class E, this is undisputable. None of those things are controversial.

    Now, those voters, in there millions swung the vote. We'll see how much "democracy" is worth to you all when you're interest rates spiral out of control & the economy black hole means more immigration & less control of our borders. I'm sure France is watching the Calais camp just as closely today as it did 2 days ago...

    I'm also not suggesting the European Union is perfect, because it isn't, but the alternative was complete fucking balls.
    Reply +2
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @keirankelleher Not to attack or judge you, but the only people who are not depressed are those with nothing. If you have a mortgage, a pension, planning to emigrate, work in construction or NHS you are completely fucked. Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @EnormesCojones I actually think this is more far reaching than Trump, the legacy of this will last for 30 years. At least their are mechanisms to stop Trump's excesses, this move has basically destroyed our economy, pensions & mortgages. It's basically the Joker burning a pile of money to send a message, but with this the Joker is covered in petrol. I really don't think people thought about the consequences of their actions yesterday, you don't have "control" when your economy is in free fall. Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @mega-gazz The referendum isn't a left or right issue. That's pretty obvious because all the political parties were split. Reply +3
  • grassyknoll 25/06/2016

    @burgstar Poor northern towns & older people basically pushed this through. Check any poll conducted & the main issue was immigration & Muslims (you just had to watch the news tonight). This was basically a vote to say fuck you to neo liberalism, but now we're left with a Tory government who will basically make those groups life worst. Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @Kryon "but today was a massive win for the democracy of our country and the accountability of our elected leaders (something which I think is extremely important and fundamental to our way of life). I am actually likely to lose money over this (at least initially), but It's a price I'm absolutely willing to pay."

    Actually policy is drafted by 12000 civil servants in Whitehall, which is then put to MP's who are told what to do by a whip, then reviewed by the House of Lords & signed by the Queen. Out of those 5 stages, 4 of them are unelected. I don't think it was worth fucking over my pension & mortgage, breaking the Union & destroying the construction and financial sector to remove a layer that only offered directives.
    Reply +4
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @dmanning "I can't believe people would give up control of their country (laws, borders etc.) for free trade. No other country does this."

    27 countries do right now.
    Reply +3
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @mega-gazz Racism isn't the bedrock of rationality. Anyway, the point is there was only a million votes in it, people who vote BNP, or are members of EDF or the darker parts of UKIP swung the vote. Rationality lost because of fear in the end. Reply -3
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @BobbyDeNiro Every single poll that charted issues influencing the referendum had immigration first, followed by the NHS, then the economy. The remain camp failed to realise that those who are economy unstable, don't fear economy instability. People can deny that xenophobia & racism didn't influence voters, but it obviously did, combined with anti intellectualism & ideas of sovereignty. Reply -3
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @mega-gazz Why would a racist or someone who's xenophobic want to remain in the EU?

    I would also point out there's going to be more immigration now, there's going to be a brain drain & economy black hole. We as a country could halved immigration yesterday if we wanted to (half is from outside the EU), but you'd have no pension or health service. Everyone's picked their poison, but the NHS will be gone in a decade, Great Britain as a construct in 3, people will have higher wages, but their currency will be worthless, add a million on unemployment & your mortgage is fucked.

    *raises empty wine glass*
    Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @GameChampionz No it's not. Read it again. You don't have to be condition A to be condition B, but everyone who's condition B is condition A.

    Edit: Think of it this way in gaming terms, all PlayStation 4 owners don't own Uncharted 4, but all Uncharted 4 owners own (or have access to) a PS4.
    Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @mega-gazz And looking at the demographics of who voted, leave voters were predominantly older, twice as likely not to be university educated & claiming income support / housing benefit. They're basically the groups that Brexit is going to hit first & hardest. Also the key issue was "immigration" beyond everything else. I'm not saying all leave voters are racist, but all racists voted leave. Reply +5
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @number1024 Both the campaigns were lead by fear, there was voices of reason in both campaigns but they couldn't be heard above all the other noise. The In campaign should have been driven not by the economy, but how the EU makes people's lives better and how it's a place of opportunity. Reply +7
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @silents For me, I voted remain because I like economic stability, believe in economic free movement (which is the future of the global economy if we like it or not) & the ability to work in 27 countries, the EU has funded 3 cities I've lived in (Manchester post IRA bomb & the current redevelopment of Sheffield), gives funding to science & the arts and as been critical in stabilising armed conflict in Europe. The Human Rights Act & its creation fundamentally acts as a means for what we as a collective should strive for. There's just so many positives. The negatives should have been changed within it. Reply +8
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @number1024 This is obviously David Cameron's idea to shut down backbenchers (he miscalculate and it's now destroyed him), but I think the leave vote tells or about the state of the electorate which is even more depressing, they're uneducated, irrational & unfortunately xenophobic (immigration was a huge issue). Reply -4
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @silents That doesn't really answer the question. I honestly think you kind of sum up what a lot of leave voters did, they don't know what they actually voted for. There isn't sovereignty, because we have a unelected monarch & the House of Lords. On votes about European issues, the UK voted with the majority on 97% of the time. When there's talk of trade agreements, they want (or expect them) to be the same, so what's the point of leaving in the first place?

    In the end there's just a lot of talk about being "Great" Britain, but that isn't either going to exist in 3 years time now (which was an obvious side effect of us leaving). It's just a fucking pointless dumpster fire and a protest against neoliberalism, but now we're left with the Tory's who have free reign. Most Leave voters may as well have punched themselves in the face, it would be less painless.
    Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    @silents "I want a Great Britain again"

    In what way?
    Reply +5
  • grassyknoll 24/06/2016

    The anger directed at Europe from many is just so misplaced, it's really the failure of government that is making the quality of life for the majority worst. The only good thing to come from this is the Tory scum can't blame anyone else any more for the problems they create (& hopefully UKIP will dissipate with us leaving the EU). Reply +6
  • The UK's two biggest video game magazine companies are now one

  • grassyknoll 23/06/2016

    @Duffking One Direction are also better than the Rolling Stones. Reply +3
  • grassyknoll 23/06/2016

    @vert1go Popularity = Quality? Reply +22
  • Vivendi now owns over 20% of Ubisoft shares

  • grassyknoll 22/06/2016

    @Bloobat Going from memory, I think it's 9.4%, but more in voting rights with the board. Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 22/06/2016

    I know people get very critical when talking about Ubisoft (myself included), but they do own one of the best studios in the world: Ubisoft Montpellier (who made Rayman, ZombiU and Beyond Good & Evil). I dread to think what would happen to them if Vivendi took over. Reply +60
  • Murky world of PC game key reselling exposed by indie developer

  • grassyknoll 21/06/2016

    @Bagpuss Where on earth are you buying your games from if they cost 60 - 90?!? Reply +17
  • Mighty No. 9 review

  • grassyknoll 20/06/2016

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5UXDiQrgI6M

    One of the worst bait & switches in modern gaming. I honestly would love to know how they spent their money.
    Reply -7
  • Are 4K visuals really the best use for Project Scorpio and PlayStation Neo?

  • grassyknoll 18/06/2016

    Digital Foundry is really miking these new consoles for all they're worth. We know absolutely nothing about them & getting bored of all this empty theorising. Are we ever going to have interesting pieces with developers again? Reply 0
  • NieR: Automata gets an all new gameplay trailer for E3

  • grassyknoll 18/06/2016

    @Axepriest They've showed some side scrolling gameplay twice, once this E3 & a Nier concert a few months ago. Reply 0
  • Eurogamer's best of E3 2016

  • grassyknoll 17/06/2016

    @vert1go What are you playing on the WiiU this year? Reply -2
  • Dead Rising 4 is Microsoft-exclusive for a year

  • grassyknoll 17/06/2016

    @Mr_Writer85 That game is definitely going to do well. Does all the tick box stuff (open world, zombies etc) & will be so so easy to advertise. Could see it sell 3/4 million, maybe more with good reviews. Reply -1
  • grassyknoll 17/06/2016

    @Decaf A year late port of a franchise that's only had one other version on a Playstation platform isn't going to do well. By then the game is old hat & competing against newer games with far larger (well existent) advertising campaigns. Capcom (& SE with Tomb Raider) will just be doing stealth releases, no one is going to be really excited. It'll probably be released near Days Gone as well, which is going to be huge. Reply +1
  • grassyknoll 17/06/2016

    @Perjoss If Nintendo is going the direction I think, then expect an NX version. Reply 0
  • grassyknoll 17/06/2016

    So, Dead Rising is Windows 10 exclusive for 90 days (so on Steam 3 months after release) & free to be on another console after a year (so PS4 version then). Overall a bit of a non story, although that PS4 version is DOA. Reply -1