gerg Comments

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  • The FarmVille Diaries

  • gerg 05/04/2010

    "Are we supposed to be impressed by the Pied Piper of Hamlyn, now?"



    In that the feat would show an impressive amount of skill and talent, yes.



    You can objectively analyse something as impressive without inherently liking it or disliking it.
    Reply +2
  • gerg 05/04/2010

    I find it somewhat hypocritical, to say the least, that people are ready to criticise a game like FarmVille for actively incorporating "addictive" elements into its game (and thus, perhaps indirectly, to its business model), and yet don't mind similarly addictive elements in other games: leaderboards, multiplayer modes, achievements, trophies... they all utilise social gaming in the same way that FarmVille does. That FarmVille so successfully engineers these elements isn't something that's to be criticised, but to be praised as very good game design. Reply +2
  • gerg 05/04/2010

    I understand that Zynga engaged in some shady business practices, yes.



    But to focus on that fact alone is to ignore the fact that Nintendo, ultimately, sells a physical product for a fixed price, whereas Zynga have made money by digitally distributing their game freely on an open social platform, generating revenue from (third-party) advertising and micropayments.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 05/04/2010

    Don't be that simple please, are you comparing a shady company which probably wants to make as much "doh/mullah" as possible before retiring to the bahamas and care litle about reputation with a +100 year old company with social role in Japan to a large degree and even in the rest of the world ?



    I'm struggling to find the relevance of any of those qualities to the point at hand.
    Reply -1
  • gerg 05/04/2010

    You don't have to like something in order to find it exciting - I will probably never play FarmVille, and have successfully ignored it up until now. What's quite amazing about FarmVille is how quickly it has become popular, while eschewing almost everything that's thought of as necessary to do so. Zynga make Nintendo's business model look archaic. Reply -3
  • gerg 05/04/2010

    FarmVille is one of the most exciting things to happen to gaming for a long, long time. Reply -19
  • Wii Roundup

  • gerg 03/09/2008

    @gerg



    "I suspect you are going to start splitting hairs with me between percentages and actual numbers. The PS2 may have had a few thousand shite games, but it had equal numbers of good ones, certainly more good games than I could reasonably play and still have any kind of tan."



    That's not the point. I said, all leading systems have had masses of shovelware. Therefore, the fact that we are seeing tons on the Wii is no surprise, except that it is noticed more because of crap support from the third-parties that count.



    "The rest of your post goes on about third parties ignoring the system, and developers being lazy etc. Without sounding like an ass, I just don't care about the excuses."



    What excuses? The Wii is a great system on which to sell software, because, guess what, the software sells great (or no worse than on other systems). There are certainly reasons, therefore, why most developers are happy to leave all this cash on the table.



    "I don't care why this is unless the knowing of the why also brings a solution, and I don't really care what percentage of SNES games also sucked balls. All I care about is that I find it hard to justify the purchase of a Wii, 'cos I know one month later it will be gathering dust unless something changes. I find this annoying, as there are games on the Wii that I want to play, but I can't really justify forking out 240 (console + 2 games) just to play 2 games."



    Fine, you don't want to purchase a Wii. I get that and I don't care any more about such a fact. All I'm saying is that I don't see why it is so amazing that there is a lot of shovelware on the Wii, and that the lack of great games has nothing to do with shovelware at all.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 03/09/2008

    kangarootoo: You deny the huge volumes of shovelware that has littered the PS2, SNES and NES? Jesus.



    Furthermore, I said "leading console". Not only that, but as most major developers are too afraid and/or lazy to try something new and different on the Wii (or the PS3 or Xbox 360 for that matter), they gladly place their AAA titles on the PS3 and Xbox 360.



    Third party support for the Wii is pretty rubbish, and is ever so slowly improving. However, it is rubbish because third parties choose to ignore the system, and not because of petty shovelware.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 03/09/2008

    People really seem to believe that shovelware started with the Wii, don't they? God, it's like people get amnesia of previous gaming history every time a new generation starts.



    Seriously, crap shovelware games litter every leading console. It's also true that when third parties bother to put effort into their Wii projects, the results are usually good. What's the problem?
    Reply 0
  • The Casuals Are Coming!

  • gerg 13/08/2008

    @smelly: Gaming has been "casual" since the PS1 first skyrocketed past 100 million consoles sold. The only difference between now and then is that in the 90s the expansion was somewhat less noticeable because it was with the same demographic that many gamers had been before - that is, men aged 15 to 30something. Nowadays, having saturated that market, we're simply seeing expansion into other areas - women and 40somethings and 50somethings.



    @afghan_jones: I know. It's such a shame that Bungie is making casual party games, Sony's making easy puzzle games, Ubisoft is abandoning fan-favourites such as Prince of Persia and Beyond Good & Evil, Capcom no longer makes Street Fighter and Resident Evil, and that there's been a recent drought of gritty FPSs recently... oh wait. Get over yourself.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    secombe: Nowhere, because casual and hardcore games don't exist. ; ) If we had to describe it, I'd simply call it an accessible, difficult game. Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    As I said, accessibility has got nothing intrinsically to do with being a casual game. A game can be deep and yet accessible - look at chess, for example.



    I just don't see your point. Your view appears to be that games with deep storylines that require a great deal of interest from the player are intrinsically hardcore, and ones that don't are casual.



    But, why does requiring such a great deal of interest make a game hardcore? Why is a deep storyline hardcore? Tetris is a hard game to master, and millions invest hours playing it, so is that, too, hardcore? As I have said, millions of casual gamers have bought Call of Duty 4, and GTA and Halo 3. If so many of them can play through a game with a deep storyline that requires a great deal of time to complete, surely then enjoying such a quality is not exclusively relegated to hardcore gamers?



    Overall, I'm not trying to deny that these games have qualities which make them accessible, or which require the player to invest significant time into playing the game, but merely wondering what the hell such qualities have to do with being either more interested in gaming on the whole (hardcore gamer), or being less interested in gaming (casual gamer). In general, it seems the only barrier to the games which have such qualities is accessibility, considering that the same type of people who don't play Metal Gear Solid are equally glad to watch a two hour complex crime thriller, and are also as happy to invest an equal or greater amount of time mastering Tetris or Solitaire.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    Farzlepot: I don't see how a game's level of violence has anything to do with a) its maturity and b) its level of "hardcoreness", unless we're reverting back to playground thinking along the lines of "OMG teh violence is teh mature is teh hardcore!".



    And second, playing with online friends and playing with real life friends - doesn't change the game's pick-up-and-play nature now, does it?



    Oh, and I'm not being facetious, I'm just taking your definitions and turning them on their head.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    Farzlepot: Good to know that Tetris and Wii Sports (and Wii Play, even, as others in this thread have stated) is a hardcore game, then. And good to know that games like Halo 3 and Call of Duty 4 are casual, considering I can pick-up-and-play them solely with others across Xbox Live.



    The reason why the labels "hardcore games" and "casual games" fall flat is because they have no relation to the labels "hardcore gamers" and "casual gamers". Indeed, games like Madden and Halo, games which you have associated with traditional "harcore" qualities, are only so popular because they attract a large casual audience. If we can then see that casual gamers can enjoy the qualities of a game that you feel make them so "hardcore", why then are such games "hardcore games"?
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    jozz: And what high-budget third-party games have been released on the Wii in the past six months or so? All we know is that games are selling very well (YTD, the Wii has sold around 13 million units of third-party software in America, whereas the 360 has sold around 16 million units [source]), but we don't know which games are, and every time we say that the "majority of Wii owners" are buying Carnival Games, it is equally fair to say that a great deal of gamers are actually buying other games instead. Furthermore, No More Heroes was the best selling Suda 51 game to date (even selling more than all his PS2 releases), and Zack and Wiki bested Capcom's expectations. Both games were advertised like crap, and yet they sold very well for their publisher's expectations. Ultimately, I think it's stupid for developers to expect something for nothing - put the money into your game's development, and most importantly, put the money into its advertising, and you will be rewarded.



    For my second point, just look at any upcoming holiday release list for the PS3 or Xbox 360. Go to IGN and look at an upcoming releases list. Do they look sparse and casual-orientated to you?



    @bad09: It's understandable. Most people working in creating a game are probably, at heart, artists, and artists don't like to have their tools limited when better options are out there.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    @bad09: The solution for your problem is to put those types of games on the Wii and take advantage of the lower development costs. Granted, the graphical difference will be huge, but the PS2 had no shortage of epic games. Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    frod: And I'm saying there isn't. Apart from all the games I noted (except Beijing 2008) all the games that are selling are quality games whether or not you like them. There was a lot of crap released in 2004, and there is a lot now. Nothing has changed except that one type of crap (GTA clones, licensed rubbish) has changed to another type of crap (expanded market games). You point out that some of the "lower-budget" titles were interesting, and that hasn't changed here, except that we're seeing less lower-budget titles because of the demands of the hardcore gamer that have pushed development costs up. Furthermore, do note that the difference between position 1 and position 40 may actually not be that much at times, so that there are plenty of games that sell reasonable amounts off the charts (like Ratchet & Clank and Uncharted). What I dislike is your equating of "games I want to play" to "games worth playing".



    Cooper42: I don't think that accessibility is the enemy of hardcore gamers. You can have a perfectly deep game that is still accessible to a wide range of people through tutorials or including a backstory, etc.

    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    ryohazuki1983: Why? Even if casual gamers are less interested in gaming as a whole, why would that stop them putting in the effort to complete a game they've bought? And what say you of hardcore gamers who don't complete that many games?



    bad09: And I say it again, can't the two type of games exist? Furthermore, as much as it is the stock investors and publishers who may dictate where the money goes, it is the actual developers themselves who dictate as to what it is spent on, and in this way, most developers actually like making the same type of games that we've been seeing for ages.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    bad09: You say that, and yet the Wii has been dominating for over a year now, and its software for over six months, and yet the hardcore release list doesn't look any sparser on the PS3 or Xbox 360. It is clear that developers are unwilling to change from developing big budget, epic games, for various understandable reasons. Either we'll start seeing those games on the Wii, or we won't, and the Wii will be the most ignored successful console ever. Furthermore, minigame collections aren't intrinsically bad, and there are a lot of hardcore gamers out there who enjoy them (a la Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games). You are also presupposing that traditional games are intrinsically unprofitable, and although the barrier to profit may be higher in this generation, this doesn't stop profitable games from being released. Lastly, if there is any reason why hardcore games are not succeeding, it is solely because of hardcore gamers with their expectations for amazing graphics and features on their consoles, and thus games which take full advantage of such graphics and features, pushing up development costs, rather than casual gamers with their lower expectations (regarding graphics, at the least).



    I find it perfectly reasonable to believe that casual tripe and traditional games to co-exist. I don't see why others don't.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    Zomoniac: Really? My mistake. Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    frod: I'm sorry, but Catwoman is no better than Carnival Games, just because it appeals to you slightly more. Both are rubbish games, and both have managed to sell (one more so than the other). A comparison to Need for Speed is much less apt.



    Looking at this week's charts, the only games that I would consider bad are Big Beach Sports, Sports Party, Carnival: Funfair Games, Wall-E (for the Wii, the DS version seemed only average), Beijing 2008, Puzzler Collection, Game Part, Sports Island and Imagine: Babies. The rest of the games, whether you like what they are trying to do or not, have actually had a great deal of effort and time spent into them to produce a product that deserves to sell.



    Really, it doesn't matter that mini-game rubbish is selling because those sales are not affecting other games. Did the casual licensed rubbish that littered the charts in 2004 affect the production of, what, Metal Gear? So either you run around doing a Chicken Little impersonation shouting "The sky is falling! The sky is falling!" or you can realise that casual games will not affect the production of the games that you like, and simply deal with the fact that the industry is expanding - something which can only be a good thing.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    @SteelPriest: The only difference I could conceive in terms of different playstyles between casual gamers and hardcore gamers is that due to casual gamers having less interest in gaming, their playtimes are probably going to be shorter (but not necessarily less frequent). However, designing a game to allow for such a playstyle is simply a challenge in accessibility more than anything else.



    @frod: You're using a truck-load of licensed rubbish to illustrate a point that gaming in 2004 was what, more hardcore than it is today? Hahahahahaha. The PS2 and the PS1 thrived on casual gamers Casual gamers have always existed, except instead of being the new legion of gamers who will mostly buy GTA or Madden, they're now a legion of gamers who will mostly buy Wii Sports or Wii Fit.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    @Darren: the idea that the games industry will, en masse, abandon hardcore gamers is ridiculous. Although, as a percentage of the total industry, their numbers are decreasing, in absolute numbers they can only grow. Hardcore gamers will always exist, and as they buy the most games the most often, there will always be a profit to be made to selling them. The current desire within most developers is apaprently to make great, cinematic games - as long as there is a platform that allows that, they will continue to do so. And it's not like Sony and Microsoft are now going to take a step back in the graphics department when the next generation comes around (in perhaps four to six years). Instead, a graphical advancement is still likely to be made, but that it will be smaller than the leap from the PS2 to the PS3.



    @Zomoniac: If the Wii ends up selling around 160 or 180 million units (if not more), then I think it is safe to say that the PS1 and PS2 pads were too complex to a great deal of people. Don't forget that the PS1 and the PS2 were also casual machines at their heart.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    Rirekon: You do realise that all the people who are so-called "casual gamers" and supposedly can't play deep games are the same people who will gladly sit in a cinema for a couple of hours and watch a complex crime thriller? I don't see how a person's perception of a game is intrinsically connected to their "causal" or "hardcore" nature. Reply 0
  • gerg 12/08/2008

    Casual gamers and hardcore gamers certainly exist and can simply be defined in terms of level of interest in gaming.



    The terms that make no sense are "casual games" and "hardcore games".
    Reply 0
  • Wii Music

  • gerg 17/07/2008

    What's the problem with this game? If you don't like it, don't buy it. It's as simple as that.



    And yes, you may be a bit bitter when Nintendo expects you to get all hyped up about a game that may not be designed to appeal to you, and there's seemingly little left on the line-up. But if you've been following any of Nintendo's announcements over the past six months you'd have realised that Wii Music and Animal Crossing are certainly not their only games for the holiday period, and that they're going to announce more (hardcore/core) games closer to the time period.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 17/07/2008

    @spekkeh: You can share videos of your tunes with friends, but I think it would be better if you could send the tune data for other people to edit on.



    Anyway, for anyone doubting the Drumkit mode after the horrible, horrible E3 conference, check out this video. So much better.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 17/07/2008

    The thing is, this isn't even as creative as Electroplankton. In games like Electroplankton and Spore's Creature Creator you have a pure sandbox where you can create anything you want. You don't get that here - you have to settle for pre-chosen tunes to play along to. Nintendo should really make a "create what you want" mode the main focus on the game, and focus on interactivity between players by allowing them to send their tunes to each other, edit them however they want, and then send them back for the other players to edit again. But still, Miyamoto's goal to make a music game where the focus is the enjoyment of playing harmoniously together in a band is an admirable one. Reply 0
  • Nintendo E3 Conference

  • gerg 15/07/2008

    Gah! What a disappointment! I just hope that this is only Nintendo trying to receive mainstream attention from the media, and that all the casual titles will be counterbalanced by hardcore game announcements later in the week. So disappointed... :( Reply 0
  • Nintendo dismisses widescreen DS claims

  • gerg 08/07/2008

    @Krelle:



    "lolz, this years GW? hardly."



    I don't see what you mean. Back in April the difference in sales was around 40,000 to 50,000 units. It's much lower now. If Nintendo had been that concerned, a price drop would have occurred back then.



    "Also, wth is Dragon Quest 9? Probably the only game that would boost DS sales considerably now."



    I presume you mean "Where the hell is DQ IX"? Well, if DQ V only makes the Autumn/Winter quarter, DQ IX probably won't hit until Mid to Late 2009. If DQ IX doesn't make 2009? Well, people better get comfortable waiting for FF XIII.



    Anyway, I still don't think you've argued against my point.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 08/07/2008

    @Krelle: How am I on the "crazy train"? If Nintendo were really that concerned about slowing DS sales in Japan (the only region where sales are slowing, yet also the one where around 1/5th of the population own a DS), they would already have done something to stop it, perhaps to coincide with Golden Week. They don't have any reason to be concerned anyways, but they've still shown that they're not worried. Reply 0
  • gerg 08/07/2008

    @Mentalist(air): You have undone yourself there. If the hardware has reached saturation point, the one thing that won't have any effect is to lower the price.



    No, I haven't. I'm saying that the DS Lite may have reached saturation point as its current price level. It's like saying that the PS3 and Xbox 360 have reached saturation point at their current price levels (which they have). Lowering the price point opens the console up to people who would not consider it at a higher price.



    I don't believe Nintendo give a toss about Guitar Hero: World Tour. If there's a new model DS, and it's sucecssfull, then Guitar Hero: On Tour 2 will come with a new-DS compatible guitar neck thing.



    Even when they showcased Ubisoft's My Weight Loss Coach at their event last Spring? Seriously, the GBA slot isn't going anywhere.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 08/07/2008

    @penhalion: You say that either:



    1. The hardware has reached saturation point.

    2. The hardware is no longer considered to be the in thing.



    Well, the second factor is patently false considering how healthy the DS is for software. The first can be remedied by lowering the price. Overall, the situation has been the same for the past six months. If Nintendo were really that concerned about the problem, they would have certainly done something by now. And really, what are you people expecting from a redesign? Nintendo will want to do nothing that would split the current fanbase, so any major hardware revisions are out of the question - even getting rid of the GBA slot is not going to happen with the success of Guitar Hero: On Tour.



    I am not mistaking hardware for software. However, I just don't see why the slowing hardware is actually a problem for Nintendo when the software is so good.
    Reply 0
  • gerg 08/07/2008

    @penhalion: The DS is much more alive than the PSP. Although hardware sales are slowing, they're certainly not bad (better than the PS2 in its fourth year, me thinks - and you try selling so well when your LTD is greater than the PS2), and software sales are amazing. Seriously, week in week out around 30+ of the games in the top 50 are for the DS. The PSP gets, what, two or three titles in the top 50, and one of those is Monster Hunter. And your point about new releases is ridiculous. A new entry in the Dragon Quest series, the biggest series in Japan bar Final Fantasy, is now just a "series rehash"?! Seriously, learn something about Japanese gaming and then come talk to me. And this is, of course, ignoring the multitude of new games that get announced each month for the system, whether new IPs from Square, or sequels to low-selling GBA games. Quite frankly, you cannot argue that the DS is dying in Japan. Reply 0
  • gerg 07/07/2008

    @Feanor: A good sales-age knowledge never hurt. Seriously, claims about a DS redesign are ludicrous - Nintendo has no financial reason whatsoever to introduce a DS redesign at this point. Reply 0
  • gerg 07/07/2008

    @Krelle: And that hardly matters. The DS has a 10 million+ lead in the region, and the PSP will most likely struggle to gain on it at a rate of a million units a year. Monster Hunter and various special-edition colour releases have managed to keep the PSP Lite selling (although the redesign does seem to be genuinely generating greater interest), whereas Nintendo still has Dragon Quest IX coming, and has yet to lower the price of the DS once in Japan (it actually went up with the DS Lite). And even in the current circumstances, software on the PSP is dead, but on the DS it's thriving. Simply said, Nintendo has nothing to worry about. Reply 0
  • UK chart: Smash Bros. still victorious

  • gerg 08/07/2008

    Wii Fit's at #4 in the top ten individual formats chart, too. Nintendo's doing really well in the UK, and Europe as a whole, at the moment. Reply 0
  • WiiWare: My Pokémon Ranch and Pop

  • gerg 07/07/2008

    I think J.C should be reversing his statement considering Megaman 9 is a WiiWare exclusive. WiiWare = WowWare for the most part. Reply 0
  • PSP still winning hardware race in Japan

  • gerg 30/05/2008

    The PSP is truly like a zombie - the body may be moving but in reality it's dead inside. Reply 0
  • WiiWare Roundup

  • gerg 29/05/2008

    Toki Tori is an amazing game that's well worth the money. The graphics are really good (I doubt they could have been replicated on the Wii), and some of the levels are new (despite being a remake of the GBC title). The puzzling is clever and the controls work pretty well (although they can sometimes be slightly inaccurate when having to do fast, successive maneuvers). It's one of the best games on the service - I don't know what thesombrerokid is on. Reply 0
  • Swap Stars for Wii Points now!

  • gerg 09/12/2007

    @smelly: But you've already spent 960. 20 is about 2.1% of 960. If I've spent the 960 pounds, getting 20 extra is really nothing. I'm not arguing about the fact that the Wii Points are free, but rather that getting them becomes meaningless due to the fact that in order to receive a small amounts worth you have to spend a disproportionate amount more. It is simply not worth redeeming the points, because by the time you accumulate enough Stars to get a sizable amount, whatever value they have is lost in relation to how much you spent.



    Point being: 20 is nothing compared to 960, and thus the scheme is a joke.



    Reply 0
  • gerg 09/12/2007

    Actually, it appears that Nintendo is now offering old Japanese Club Nintendo stuff (just look at the picture for the Mario-hat DS game stand for proof), and frankly, I'd buy as much of that as I could get. The Stars Catalogue isn't looking so bad if they can keep it up. Reply 0
  • gerg 08/12/2007

    @smelly: It's not the point that it's free. What is the matter is that this "Stars for Wii Points" scheme was finally meant to pull the Wii Points scheme out of the redundancy it had so much enjoyed recently, and make the whole system useful. The original problem with the whole idea was that, at most times, there was nothing of interest to buy, and, if there was, whatever was on offer ran out incredibly quickly (thus, once again, making there nothing of interest to buy). Now, however, the problem is that it's simply not worth buying what there is. Sure, free is free, but if you're buying 960 worth of goods just to get 20 of "free" Stars (and soon, if not already, that'll have to be within the space of two years), you may as well go and buy the Stars anyway. And so, once again the Wii Points system is for all intents and purposes, redundant.



    Edit: Well, other stuff actually seems to be in the Stars Catalogue, so never mind what I just said.
    Reply 0
  • DS - 2007's Most Wanted

  • gerg 17/08/2007

    Am I the only person who has specifically pre-ordered Tingle RPG?



    That game looks... good/odd/fun.
    Reply 0
  • Excitebike hits Virtual Console

  • gerg 16/02/2007

    Cool. Reply 0
  • Okami

  • gerg 09/02/2007

    Better than Zelda?



    I'm going to get it someday, so until then I'll have to wait. No means to sound like a hateboy, but I wonder what would have happened if Twilight Princess had been presented like this.
    Reply 0
  • Nintendo on Wii Sports 2 rumour

  • gerg 22/12/2006

    "just rumour and speculation" means "dang it, you caught us" from Nintendo. Reply 0
  • Eurogamer's Summer of PC Plenty

  • gerg 18/07/2006

    And no Seiklus?! Reply 0
  • Sonic the Hedgehog

  • gerg 31/05/2006

    I don't understand the Tails hate. 'Always play as him in the later Sonic Game Gear games. Reply 0
  • Nibris clarifies Sadness details

  • gerg 01/05/2006

    NIBRIS is not Vaporware.



    It's producing three games at the moment, has been in talk with Nintendo, and has development kits. It will be at E3.



    It's first two games are part of a 'Raid Over the River' series. The first will be released on the DS, the second on the Wii. Sadness will also be at Wii.
    Reply 0