abeeken Comments

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  • Mortal Kombat X modder makes unplayable characters playable

  • abeeken 17/04/2015

    I remember a time when characters in fighting games could be unlocked through game progression. Once again, MK is showing another facet of how modern games are over monetising. On disc dlc, iaps. It's bloody shameful. Reply +15
  • UK PlayStation Store lists inFamous for PS Now

  • abeeken 16/04/2015

    I still think that any games on your psn account that are available on now should be streamable WITHOUT a monthly membership for Plus account holders. That would then give plus members the option if outright buying the gangs they want to play instead of a separate membership. Reply +7
  • Skylanders-style Lego Dimensions features Batman, Gandalf, Back to the Future

  • abeeken 09/04/2015

    @TomPhillipsEG uses logic and facts in the EG comments section - it's not very effective. Reply +2
  • abeeken 09/04/2015

    Oh no. Oh no no no. You bastards. You found my weakness. I can enjoy Infinity but not obsess over it. I like me an Amiibo when I can get hold of them. But this? You'll start putting the characters in actual lego sets soon as extras, won't you. You monsters. Reply +13
  • Video: We very almost speedrun the Titan Souls demo

  • abeeken 08/04/2015

    How have I not heard of this before? Looks awesome! Will be getting me some of that demo this evening... Reply +2
  • Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate now has a Sonic Palico costume

  • abeeken 03/04/2015

    Referring to a Sonic costume as Nintendo fan service has blown my 12 year old mind. Grab a Flux Capacitor, travel back to the 90s and show a playground full of kids Mario and Sonic coexisting and you'll get lynched for being a heretic. How times change! Reply +21
  • "He suddenly became incredibly sullen, angry and frustrated. He was 10"

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @Lionheart GTA3 was incredibly tame in comparison to modern titles - in fact I don't even think it had any bad language in it (at the very least it had nothing worse than "shit", "ass" etc) - to this day I still find excessive swearing in games problematic. As a teen I'm sure I saw swearing as edgy, and cool, but as I grow up it begins to grate and a lot of modern games overuse swearing (which can be a GREAT narrative tool in dialogue if you want to push a point forwards) by giving random expletives to NPC's, making the impact comical at best, awkward at worst.

    In particular I found that I struggled to enjoy Arkham City because every single goon in that game repeatedly and relentlessly called Catwoman "bitch". Also your example of Tomb Raider which was always a bit of a fun pulp adventure lost something in the translation to "gritty reboot" and became just another violent game. There's too many of them. Developers need to learn restraint.
    Reply +3
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @lone_wolf_uk I'd be interested to get the perspective on a social worker on this. You're right, there is no law per say but it's a moral issue - perhaps I may allow an older child a sip of wine, but I wouldn't hand them a can of Carling.

    For the record I agree with the intent of the letter but, as the teacher in the article freely admits, it is a blunt instrument. Having received many letters from school they can often be written in a way that makes them seem unnecessarily terse. That doesn't mean that this isn't an issue, however, and something like this needed to be done to spark dialogue.

    I also think there is a vast divide between parental choice and common sense in may instances (although the chocolate in the lunchbox thing did rub us up the wrong way) but in many cases the schools need to be seen to at least make an effort to take action to pre-empt things like OFSTED. I have a number of close relatives who teach and assessments are a horrific time. Any tiny, small thing that the school is deemed to not be doing right can result in a mark down and a reduction of funding.
    Reply +1
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @Frybird Absolutely - overexposure to this kind of thing results in desensitization. Yes, kids play cowboys and indians, cops and robbers - whatever. But there's a difference between running around shouting "Pew pew!" at someone in pretend and pulling a trigger on your controller to make a virtual person explode in a shower of gibs. It's a more visceral experience and children don't have the mental capacity to separate it from reality. Reply +2
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @lone_wolf_uk Allowing children to consume small amounts of weak table wine, specifically produced for the cultural purpose, is not what I meant. Reply +1
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @RobertPaulson I'm disappointed that I can't upvote your comment more than once. I agree with every single one of your points - I've played games since I was 6 (on a ZX Spectrum, no less), used to work for Game and now have children of my own. I've watched the gaming industry develop and blossom to a point where, on the whole, it is entirely manipulative of its intended audience. Not all entertainment is suitable for all age groups, yet more and more we're seeing games coming out that have incredible amounts of violence, swearing and sex in them. I'm not saying that's a bad thing but when almost every new release is a 16 or 18+ game in a hobby that appeals to all ages, there is something wrong.

    Bring back things like Jak, Ratchet, Banjo - lose the stigma against Mario! Yes these games are bright and colourful and appeal to younger audiences, but they are as much a challenge (if not moreso) than shooting or kerb stomping people to death. Gamers have become desensitized - violence is the norm and that should not be seen as a positive.
    Reply +11
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @lone_wolf_uk The parent does have a right - but that doesn't MAKE them right. I've got a right to serve my kids alcohol in the home if I see fit. That doesn't make it right, however. Reply +7
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @Pickster I think I agree with that - the BBFC system was at least widely recognised from video ratings. Reply +2
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    I said this in the other article but I'll repeat it here - kids NEED boundaries. There needs to be restrictions placed on what children consume not only to stop them consuming inappropriate content but to give them things to rebel against as they grow. That's a positive and it should be seen that way - allowing them to rebel allows them to make their own decisions about things and builds character.

    The internet has broken down those boundaries - it is anarchy in digital form and giving kids tablets and other connected devices is not good until they can understand why they are using them. It's not a case of understanding HOW to use them but how to use them RESPONSIBLY.

    I've talked in the past about how we restrict our kids online usage to monitored sessions, no online gaming, no friends lists unless we know that these are friends from school and we can corroborate that with THEIR parents. One response to that which stayed with me was "That's unfair - you're shielding them from modern technology and will stunt their development." That is wrong and clearly is the attitude of people who either don't have children or don't give two shits about what their children are doing.

    My eldest son, aged 9, asked me why we did this. He wasn't complaining or anything - just asking. I couldn't talk to him about porn - we want him to bowl the first ball about the birds and bees. So I went the shock site route. "Do you want to see a picture of a dead person? Maybe someone who got run over by a car, or shot?" He went white as a sheet. No. No he did not. "Well I have but not because I wanted to. It's easy to stumble onto something on the internet that you don't want to see and I don't want that to happen to you."

    I love horror movies. I have a strong interest in the technical aspects of gore effects and rarely get scared at things like that. But I never had it shoved in my face by my parents. It's something I discovered for myself because these things were taboo. I grew up in the 80's where the term "Video Nasty" was thrown about by the press. The restrictions were everywhere. Looking at the boxes of horror films felt wrong which made it all the more exciting. They weren't things I was allowed to watch - sometimes my mind came up with things that had no bearing on what the actual film contained.

    We need boundaries. We need to respect that children should be allowed to be children and shouldn't be made to grow up too quickly by letting them have free reign online or play games like GTA and COD. But above all we should allow them to question these boundaries and rebel against them. And when they do rebel, we should be ready to discuss that.
    Reply +18
  • N64, DS games launch on Wii U Virtual Console

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @JoelStinty I almost wonder if DeNA are being made scapegoats in this - someone to blame when fans get uppity about price gouging on Nintendo branded mobile games. "Oh, we didn't develop those, sorry!" Reply 0
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @JoelStinty I'm hoping that Pokemon Shuffle was simply an experiment - even my 9y/o boy could see through it's money grubbing tactics. Rumble World looks like it has more ways to actually get gems outside of IAP's, but the talk from DeNA about wanting to make millions a month on Nintendo property is disheartening. Reply 0
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    Here comes the "Overpriced Virtual Console!!" crowd - try finding a physical copy anywhere for a cheaper price, especially DK64. Nintendo should be praised for providing legal ways of playing these games at a reasonable and realistic price in the same way that Sony have their PSOne classics available for download. Collectors will have their carts, casual players will have a folder full of rom's, but these systems are the only ways to legally support the developers. Reply +7
  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    Definitely picking up Sin and Punishment on Wii; missed the disc version when it launched. Pandora's Tower is a great game for anyone on the fence - sort of Zelda like with a time element ala Majora's Mask and a chain mechanic that I find reminiscent of Castlevania. Plays well with Wii Remote but also has Classic Controller support so should work nicely on the gamepad for off screen. Reply 0
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 3D review

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    Really want to play this but not fussed about getting a N3DS JUST for it. Shame that this port likely means we won't see it drop on Wii U Virtual Console, plus finding a disc copy at a non bank breaking price is nigh on impossible. Reply 0
  • Dirt 3 PC makes all DLC free in Steamworks transition

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @Unholy_Witchcraft I'm pretty sure I've still got a cd copy of Mobil 1 somewhere. Love that game. Reply 0
  • Splatoon inks in a May release date

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    I really didn't think I'd be that bothered about amiibo but, damn it, now I want a green squid and Yarn Yoshi. More so the Yarn Yoshi. Reply +1
  • Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Wii U Mewtwo DLC release date, price

  • abeeken 02/04/2015

    @YorkshireTea If that means Layton amiibo then Nintendo may break my wife. She's already nearly over-squeed at the Yarn Yoshi one. Reply +2
  • Yoshi Woolly World gets release date, wooly Amiibo

  • abeeken 01/04/2015

    God damn it, Nintendo, just have all my bank details! Just siphon the money right out and send me the goods! Reply +4
  • Silent Hills/P.T. page removes Kojima Productions' logo

  • abeeken 01/04/2015

    @grassyknoll I guess that's the beauty of games, though - there's something for everyone. Personally I'm more likely to focus on a game if I'm engaged by its story. That's not always been the case but as I find myself with less time to play I need more reason to play and the progression of a narrative is often the driving force. I'll agree that MGS1 was a very good game - I should really try getting back at MGS3 however I did struggle with it. MGS4 I just didn't get on with at all. Reply 0
  • abeeken 01/04/2015

    @grassyknoll I guess it depends on whether a balance could be found between making a compelling story and a game that's fun. I'd be all for doing a soft reboot, making a game set post MGS 4 that doesn't rely on the convoluted continuity, new set of characters but using some of the ideas from the previous games - a bit like Second Son is to InFamous 1&2.

    I do think it's been a long time since we've seen a game with that perfect balance, though - go too far one way and the story becomes secondary, you turn it into Assassins Creed where a really compelling story is marred by layers of unnecessary sidequesting. Take it too far the other way and you get games like The Order and Heavy Rain where the focus is purely on creating more of an interactive story. Don't get me wrong, I love all the games I mentioned above for different reasons, but there seems to be a desire from modern gamers for something that cuts straight down the middle with a balance of story and gameplay.
    Reply -1
  • abeeken 01/04/2015

    @grassyknoll It'll be interesting to see. Metal Gear Rising wasn't sold with Kojima front and center and that was quite the critical darling. Whether MGS is going annual or whether Konami are looking to expand the Metal Gear brand with other titles like Rising, it's certainly a franchise they are likely to want to leverage. Perhaps centralising the production could streamline the storytelling process. Which leads me to...

    A disclaimer! I'm not a huge fan of Metal Gear Solid and I put a lot of that down to Kojima's writing. I find it contrived and too full of exposition which is a shame because I love the gameplay elements and technical achievements. I found Rising to be more accessible for this reason. Again, this is a personal preference.
    Reply +1
  • abeeken 01/04/2015

    This is likely to be an unpopular opinion that pushes me into the red, so I'll tread carefully - all I want to do is spark conversation and thought.

    What's in a name? I tend to think this when I look at all media, be it film, music or games, sold on the back of an auteur. This individuals name is front and center and that is what the fans, the consumers focus on. A Hideo Kojima game. A Steven Spielberg film. Produced by Pharell Williams. Names that are used to sell the product rather than letting the product sell itself. Lest we forget that the much lambasted Transformers films were initially promoted with Steven Spielbergs name front and center as a producer. Names hold clout.

    Picture this - a box sits on a shelf "A Hideo Kojima Game! - Turd Party." Does the game sell? We become programmed to look at these things and go "Well, it looks like the whole game simply involves crapping but, hell, Hideo Effing Kojima!"

    One one side, Konami are stupid to drop that selling point - let's be honest, his name COULD sell a game called "Turd Party" BUT on the flipside, are we becoming too reliant on the names of PEOPLE rather than the PRODUCT to direct us to the entertainment we like?

    Just something to think about, I'm not debating the quality of the MGS games.
    Reply +4
  • PS Plus in April adds Dishonored and Never Alone

  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    And there was me thinking about picking up Dishonored, Never Alone and Tower of Guns on Steam. Another annual membership well spent :) Reply 0
  • Nintendo issues takedown notice for Super Mario 64 HD project

  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Tiger_Walts I can't argue with that. Reply 0
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Mr.Spo The Mother 3 fan translation doesn't use any assets from the games - it's a file that has to be sideloaded onto a ROM image which is not being provided with the game. Mother 4 was created entirely from scratch. Reply +1
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Sunjammer If he'd done that he'd also have watered down his ability as a developer in my eyes. It's easy to take pre-defined assets from other properties and remix them - it's harder to actually create your own ideas with an original story, graphics and sound. That takes skill and that's when people should stand up and take notice. Reply 0
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Tiger_Walts I think it's fine when companies give their blessing in specific ways, however I also think it's folly for people to expect ALL companies to follow suit - there's no obligation for them to do so.

    For example, Trent Reznor went through a phase of putting raw Nine Inch Nails tracks on his website (as GarageBand files, I believe) and encouraging remixes. That's cool! BUT, we should never EXPECT other artists to follow suit.

    Be surprised when a content creator or license owner allows you to do stuff with their stuff, but just because someone else doesn't do that, don't demonise them.
    Reply +5
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Tiger_Walts It's cool that they've done that, however under the section entitled "What are the rules?"

    You can't reverse engineer our games to access the assets or otherwise do things that the games don't normally permit in order to create your Items.
    Reply +8
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @ValkyrieRose I'll agree, there are limits, but companies are still legally obliged to take action against copyright infringement. In this instance, though, it's not like someone putting some fan art on DeviantArt; extracting assets from a game is a clear breach of the Mario Galaxy EULA.

    Yeah, maybe it sucks, but as someone pointed out the developer was using this as a clear means to draw attention to his paid for Unity plugin which also falls into using property to advertise your product or services without written agreement or a contract from the owner of that IP.

    It seems unfair but that's the way it works. Maybe we see more of this from Nintendo because people tend to focus on their game assets for independent projects. Maybe that's showing a great deal of affection, but it's also stepping into a big legal grey area. I've yet to see any fan projects use, say, artwork from God of War - who knows what Sony's take on that would be?
    Reply +7
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @ValkyrieRose Compared to which company? I guarantee you if someone made something using assets ripped from a Halo game, Microsoft would be on top of them faster than a pack of dogs at an unattended buffet. Reply +20
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @paulmarrable Absolutely - you can't make money off other people's stuff. I produce short films and I have to be so very, very careful what logos or products are on display. I compose my own music for the projects and use creative commons resources for Visual and Audio effects. I have no intention of getting into a copyright battle over something I've put a lot of my own time and money into - it's simply not worth it.

    And this attitude of "Free advertising! Fair use! Power to the people, greedy big corporates!" needs to stop. It doesn't work like that. It probably won't ever work like that - business needs structure otherwise our hobby will become ridiculously anarchic and that helps no one.
    Reply +17
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Messofanego Yes, it's still using their assets which have been extracted from their comercial property - I'm pretty sure that's against the EULA. Reply +19
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    We still don't get copyright law, do we kids? Yeah, maybe it sucks but there's nothing to stop you doing this in your own home to develop your skills - put it in the public domain, though, and you open up a whole nasty can of worms. It's the same as the YouTube videos - you use someone else's IP or assets, sometimes they're cool with that, sometimes they're not.

    Stop being so damn entitled about things.
    Reply +56
  • Ubisoft's cancelled ZombiU 2 would have featured co-op - report

  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    @Lunastra78 Having played it, it has a very "Souls" ish feel to it without the RPG elements. When you die, your next spawn can pick up the previous characters rucksack to retrieve their items. If you find manholes you can fast travel through the world - if not, you have to backtrack to where your character was when they died often having to contend with respawned zombies. It's also brutally hard like that series. Reply +3
  • abeeken 31/03/2015

    It's a shame - with the resurgence of popularity the Souls series has had over the last few years this could have potentially been an easy win for Ubi. Reply -1
  • Headteachers threaten to report parents who let their children play 18-rated games

  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    @freethinker101 Definitely an issue, but it's still the parents responsibility and, for that matter, the siblings responsibility. I'd see it being that from 16 onwards, when they are old enough to hold a full time job, they are also responsible for their actions. If that includes a parental decree to keep GTA away from little bro, then they should bloody well do so. Reply 0
  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    @Bilbur Another idea could be for developers to take some responsibility and make an open world game that would be suitable for a younger audience. Lego City Undercover was a good example but unfortunately not many people own a Wii U. It's a shame that violence, swearing and sex seem to sell games. I'm no prude - I enjoy playing games with that content (if they don't simply come across as being juvenile which they unfortunately frequently do) but it would be nice to see AAA developers making games that didn't rely on those three things. Reply +2
  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    @Indication Unfortunately it's the Daily Mail society we live in which coats genuine social issues in layers of sensationalism. Take the Video Nasties movement, for example; the issue there was that there wasn't a rating system and that kids could go into video shops and rent, say, I Spit On Your Grave without any form of restriction. But the media spun that and made it all about the films - "Why were things like Cannibal Holocaust (which was very much the Video Nasty poster boy) being allowed into this country?" instead of saying "Hang about, how come these kids are being allowed unfiltered access to this media?" No, it's not a new thing, but it's about time the media attitude to it changed, however when many parents are effectively told how to live their lives by rags like the Mail that's something that's not going to happen in a hurry. Reply +1
  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    @bosseye Monster House was an interesting one in our house - we settled down to watch it as a family albeit very tentatively. My youngest (6) cites Nightmare Before Christmas and Paranorman as two of his favourite films (he's very big into claymation style animation and latched on to Nightmare at a very young age - he even has a Jack Skellington hoodie he spent all his DIsneyland allowance on) and it's normally his older (9) brother who has issues with anything a little bit creepy. Well he utterly freaked out at Monster House while the older one wanted to watch it to the end. Another example of how you cannot second guess parents.

    With the eldest we've come to a point with him where we generally know what he's capable of - I took him to see both the last two Hobbit films at the cinema despite the 12A ratings because he'd seen the first one in a controlled environment (a flight to the US) and had also read the books. I've told him this year that we will take him to see Jurassic World and Star Wars, fully expecting them to also be 12A ratings (which seems to be the de-facto for any film that would have been a PG in the 90's) but he's aware that this is a privilege - the Marvel films are still restricted for him as I think they can be a bit strong (Winter Soldier was remarkably violent for a 12 rated film) but, again, he knows why he's being held back on them. He may not always like it but we give him dates where we'll review it.

    The biggest films we're having problems with at the moment are James Bond. He really wants to watch them but some of the older films are fairly racy and contain some dated concepts that we're really not sure how to approach with him. The problem is we want him to question things like sexism and racism, but we don't want to go out of our way to draw our attention to them.

    Parenting is the toughest job in the world!
    Reply +4
  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    @Gamblix It's interesting that you say that and I agree to an extent. Sony and Microsoft systems are, to my mind, not friendly places for kids under 15. They have a large focus on online interaction and games with adult content, however, peer pressure shows these as the "cool" systems over a Nintendo console (which I would argue should NOT be seen as a "childrens" system as there is much joy to be had playing games like Mario at all ages). Sometimes this peer pressure can even come from the parents who grew up in the Playstation/XBox generation and were caught up in what was cool or edgy. It's a shame - the PS2 was a melting pot of content for all ages and I wish we still had games like Jak and Daxter or Ratchet being released. Reply +1
  • abeeken 30/03/2015

    While I agree with most that the schools are wrong to take such a heavy handed approach, there should be a responsibility to discuss and, in some cases, educate parents of children who are allowed access to age inappropriate content, especially if that child is displaying antisocial tendencies which is disrupting their time in school.

    This argument has been going on for as long as I can remember and I find it interesting that, having watched a documentary recently about the 80's Video Nasties movement which was what ultimately led to ratings being introduced on home entertainment, the responsibility now lies even more with the parents to make sure that their children are not only aware of their boundaries but discuss why those boundaries are in place.

    We review what is suitable for our kids almost monthly - can they handle this? Is there too much violence for them here? What about the language? Kids do develop at different rates however up until late teens they remain impressionable and immature (sometimes beyond - I work in a University and some of the students here behave worse than my kids or 6 and 9). The job of a parent is a hard one - do I let my child go to play with this other child who I know has a copy of GTA? I don't want my kid exposed to that yet - I don't think he'd understand and it's likely to upset him quite a bit. Conversely, as he gets older and starts to learn more about how the world works, he'll likely come into contact with this stuff more.

    And there's another point that I think it's important for a lot of parents to understand - boundaries are critical to a childs development. There's two sides to this - it shows them clearly where a parent says "I'm cool with you doing this, but not this, because..." not only allows them opportunity to understand the concept of boundaries but also negotiation. "Okay, when can I do that?" It might be a case of "Whan you're X age we'll look at it again." Or something as simple as "When you can demonstrate I can trust you." On the flipside, it gives kids something to rebel against. My wife and I were discussing this. We won't let our eldest play certain games or watch certain things, but if he was exposed to that at a friends house we wouldn't tell him off. He'd know he was breaking the rules and he'd either be excited or upset about that. We'd ask him "Okay, that's happened - how did it make you feel?"

    It's a subject that's easy to get worked up about and I still think there is more room for parental education. Technology is moving at a stunning rate at the moment and the internet is introducing further complications in. In App Purchases, online interaction, YouTube. Parents shouldn't see restricting access to things as being bad parents or somehow unfair, and nor should they look upon these things as alternatives to actually sitting down and interacting with their children.

    I also think it's easy for a lot of gamers to get up in arms about this because they are not yet parents or see themselves as the children in question - let's be honest, no one wants to censor, restrict or take away your hobby. This is purely a social issue which really needs to be addressed and discussed in detail.
    Reply +9
  • The Legend of Zelda Wii U will not launch in 2015

  • abeeken 27/03/2015

    Fair enough. Everything feels so rushed to release at the moment anyway. Let's let stuff stew and release it in the best state possible. Will give me time to get through Xenoblade Chronicles X and my Steam and PSPlus backlog. And my Wii backlog for that matter - I've still got like three or four games from that system I never finished. And my GameCube backlog. And my PS3 backlog. Probably shouldn't plan on picking up the Gears of War games like I was planning on doing (but they're only a few quid each in CEX - NO! STOP IT!) Reply +6
  • Nintendo might be making the most exciting online shooter in years

  • abeeken 23/03/2015

    @MccyMcFlinn If that's the case then that's just sad. Some gamers need to stop being so bloody insular. Reply +3
  • abeeken 23/03/2015

    @rubberducko I think those who complain that games like this are too "childish" and "not for adults" are often not that adult themselves - I wouldn't be surprised if this lovely chap fell into the 15-20 y/o age bracket

    "I'm, like, so growed up now, super hardcore, adult, yo!"
    Reply +8
  • abeeken 23/03/2015

    @OurDogFudge Local 1v1 and, yes, there is a single player campaign with a story and everything. Reply +3