Rogueywon Comments

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  • Gears of War remaster set for Xbox One - report

  • Rogueywon 25/04/2015

    I did a replay of the original Gears of War over the last weekend before I traded my 360 in to make room for an Xbox-One. In some respects, it hadn't aged badly. But it was interesting to note how the sheer number of games that copied Gears's mechanics means that it feels very much like a genre-piece now. Easy to forget how ground-breaking it was at the time.

    Reminds me of the time a couple of years back I watched Aliens with a friend who hadn't seen it before and he complained that it was full of action-movie cliches. To which the only response is "the reason those are cliches is because this movie invented them and everybody else copied it".
    Reply +22
  • Xbox sales decreased 20 per cent year-over-year in Q1

  • Rogueywon 24/04/2015

    Not really surprising that sales declined year on year for that quarter given that last year, the console was still pretty newly launched during the quarter in question.

    Irritatingly, we still don't have a "units sold" number for the Xbox One. But interpreting from the latest figures and the last "units shipped" count, it's reasonable to infer that the current tally is somewhere in the 12 million units "sold to customer" range. That's not brilliant. It's probably a lot less than MS was hoping for. But it's not bad, either. It's more than the Wii-U has managed in almost twice the time on the shelves and it's certainly no Saturn (which managed 9.5 million over its entire lifespan).

    They really need some exclusives soon. MS had things their own way in the back end of 2014, with Forza Horizon 2, Sunset Overdrive and the Halo collection up against a very weak Christmas lineup for Sony. The last few months have tilted the other way, with the rather good Bloodborne and the mediocre (but popular) The Order.
    Reply +12
  • Batman: Arkham Knight PC system requirements detailed

  • Rogueywon 23/04/2015

    @melnificent First HDD? A 40mb drive inside a 286 12mhz, which cost a king's ransom. The entire PC cost almost 3 grand - and that's in 1990 prices - largely because of its vast 1mb of RAM. We were told that was all you'd ever need. Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 23/04/2015

    @lone_wolf_uk HDD vs SSD reliability is a tricky one.

    First of all - as with any computing component, both types of storage drive will have occasional "lemons" - drives which are dead out of box or fail shortly after activation. Let's ignore those.

    You are correct to say that SSDs have fewer moving parts and generate less waste heat and sound. The lack of moving parts is a big positive when it comes to reliability. Traditional HDDs are particularly prone to failure here, with some of the "eco" systems used to regulate drive power and spin-up-spin-down cycles on modern drives being particularly prone to failure. Seagate Barracuda HDDs (1TB through 4TB) have had a particularly bad rep for mechanical failures in recent years, with the onset of the "Seagate Squeak" being an early harbinger of a dying drive. I've had three Barracudas fail on me in a 2 year period and only use them for storage of easily-redownloaded media these days. I've had a better time with Western Digital, but they also have their detractors.

    But SSDs have their own problems. In particular, "flash wearout" essentially sets a limit on the number of times data on an SSD can be rewritten before the drive becomes unusable. With a decent drive and a properly configured operating system, most consumers don't need to worry about this too much; the drive will likely last until the rest of the PC has passed the point of obsolescence. But an SSD does require proper optmisation - Samsung and other manufacturers often provide tools that will tweak Windows registry settings to minimise unnecessary drive access - and monitoring. Because when an SSD fails, it can fail fast and it's easy to have data become unrecoverable without warning.

    In short, by and large, an SSD will be more reliable (though smaller and more expensive) than an HDD. But you do need to manage and monitor SSDs carefully for signs of failure.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 23/04/2015

    Like others in this thread (I think), I have a setup which puts the operating system, core applications and drive-speed sensitive games on an SSD (a 500GB) Samsung 840 Pro), while media and less drive-speed sensitive games go on a couple of big (3TB and 4TB) old-fashioned drives.

    Irritatingly, both install-size and drive-speed sensitivity are on the rise. Open world games in particular have a habit of being particularly drive-speed sensitive; the way they stream data in the background has a habit of causing stuttering on slower drives, no matter how fast the rest of the system. I got a bigger performance upgrade in Dragon Age: Inquisition by shifting the install to the SSD than I got from upgrading from a Geforce 680 to a 980.

    I'm going to need a bigger/second SSD soon.
    Reply +1
  • Everybody's Gone to the Rapture and the particular joy of the British apocalypse

  • Rogueywon 22/04/2015

    On The Beach has to be one of the bleakest books I've ever read. Not sure I'd describe it as "cosy catastrophe". Reply +4
  • War for the Overworld review

  • Rogueywon 21/04/2015

    @kongzi At the point at which the developer says it is release ready and has it available on the Steam store with no "early access" warnings, the title is fair game for review.

    The purpose of a review is, at the end of the day, to allow potential customers to make an informed decision about how to spend their cash. The game has been featured prominently on the Steam storefront for the last couple of weeks, so it would be remiss of major review sites not to provide a review.
    Reply +7
  • Rogueywon 21/04/2015

    @A-bob-omb My sense is that if the bugs were fixed, this would be the better option. The game is more sophisticated and has more depth.

    But those technical issues are pretty serious right now, so it's hard to make a recommendation.
    Reply +1
  • Mortal Kombat X review

  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    Good god, this has to be one of the worst game-reviews I've ever read.

    The "no scores" experiment was worth a try and it's too early to draw any conclusions on it. But if it's going to work, you need reviewers who are worth reading. This is just a thinly veiled rant about the author's hang-ups and prejudices, which tells me next to nothing about the game.

    I thought the whole point of the score-less reviews was that you got the reader to take on more information about the game so they could make an informed judgement on whether to buy?
    Reply +28
  • You now have to spend at least $5 to access some Steam features

  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    @jamyskis1981 The number of people who only play F2P without microtransactions or who only buy boxed copies and who ALSO benefit from access to the "blocked" features is going to be tiny.

    They're an edge-case. And sometimes the best thing to do is to penalise the edge-cases for the benefit of the wider user-base.
    Reply +4
  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    @Theodor70941 Weirdly, having not bought a boxed PC game for years, I did pick one up just before Christmas.

    Far Cry 4 - it was £10 cheaper off the shelf in Game than it was on Steam or uPlay. I didn't even put the disc in my drive; just entered the code in uPlay (my connection is fast enough that reading files from DVDs isn't much faster).
    Reply +6
  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    @melnificent I was at that level for a while, but tightening up the privacy settings on my account cut it to a couple a day. I'm guessing that they were somehow able to see the gift-passes section of my inventory, as I've got a couple of pages of games from pre-order deals etc in there. Mostly old or low value stuff (I think Civ 5 is probably the big-ticket item and even that has been just a couple of quid in sales), but that didn't stop them. Reply +3
  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    Good. A necessary step. Friend invite spam from scammers/beggers has been getting ludicrous lately. Reply +35
  • Mortal Kombat X enjoys biggest ever launch for a Mortal Kombat game in UK

  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    @zzkj This is a new game, however, while DOA5LR was just a repackage/remaster of an existing game that had been out for a while (and, indeed, been featured on Playstation Plus). Reply +3
  • Dungeons 2 review

  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    @Vorflynn WftO came out of early access a couple of weeks ago. Some of the multiplayer features aren't working right now, but the singleplayer campaign is fully featured and playable. Reply +1
  • Rogueywon 20/04/2015

    Not played this, but have played War for the Overworld - though it has been competing for time (and generally losing) with Bloodborne, Scholar of the First Sin and Pillars of Eternity.

    This doesn't sound as good as War for the Overworld, which I've found a generally solid and well-presented package. My only problem with WftO is that it is so close to the old Dungeon Keeper games that it feels, if anything, a bit over-familiar at times.
    Reply +1
  • The best PC games

  • Rogueywon 19/04/2015

    @Ramza Not any more. I couldn't go back to it after Final Fantasy XIV. And I say that as somebody who played WoW for many, many years and who generally despaired of would-be rivals failure to match its feature-set and content. Reply +6
  • Rogueywon 19/04/2015

    Also (sticking to recent-ish exclusives and in no particular order):

    Pillars of Eternity
    Wargame (European Escalation/Airland Battle/Red Dragon)
    Analogue: A Hate Story
    Recettear: An Item Shop's Take
    Sunless Sea
    Starcraft 2
    Reply +13
  • Eerie new Everybody's Gone to the Rapture trailer, screenshots

  • Rogueywon 16/04/2015

    @eozgonul They're not referencing Bioshock. It's more that both Bioshock and this game are referencing the concept of the Rapture, as defined in modern End-Times Christianity (based on a particular reading of the Book of Revelations).

    The Rapture referenced here is a supposed event that will mark the beginning of the Biblical end-times, in which the virtuous are carried away to heaven in an instant, before the sinners left behind are subjected to all manner of unpleasantness over the next few years, leading up to the apocalypse. In Bioshock, the city was called Rapture because it was supposed to be a retreat for the elite to escape to before a combination of social decay and nuclear war wiped out the rest of civilisation.

    In this game... hard to say. But the choice of name implies that they're going to be playing around to at least some extent with religious themes.
    Reply +13
  • Australian 2K Borderlands Pre-Sequel dev to close

  • Rogueywon 16/04/2015

    @synful_deus The standalone game doesn't seem to have broken over the 1 million mark. However, it is included in the Handsome Collection, which has almost certainly pushed it over if you include that.

    But yes, compared to Borderlands 2, it sold very poorly. Probably a combination of poor reviews/word of mouth and the fact that the original release skipped the PS4/Xbox One. 2K bet quite heavily on the new console generation failing (or at least, getting off to a very slow start). They were wrong and it has hurt them financially.
    Reply +1
  • Rogueywon 16/04/2015

    @blarty There's nothing wrong in having people know how a story ends right from the outset. Often, storytelling is about the journey rather than the destination.

    Tragedy, in particular, is a genre that works well when the ending is known from the outset. Sophocles and Euripides were telling stories whose endings the entire audience knew. :)

    The point in Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel (which has the narrative structure of a Tragedy) is that we know that Handsome Jack ends up evil; the game is showing us how he gets there. Sadly, the game's storytelling is just a bit too weak to do the idea justice. But it's not a bad idea in theory.
    Reply +6
  • Rogueywon 16/04/2015

    Sucks for those affected - especially as Australia isn't overflowing with developers at the moment.

    This wasn't that unexpected, though; Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel has been a bit of a commercial flop, particularly compared to Borderlands 2. I've completed two playthroughs of the Pre-Sequel (compared to 10 or so for BL2) and there are some really good sections in there, but they're hidden behind a dreadful opening section (the first 6 hours or so) which is almost painful to push through.

    It was also clear that 2k's high command wasn't willing to put much resource into supporting it. The DLCs have been very thin and shoddy compared to Borderlands 2's and the season pass in particular was an outright rip-off.
    Reply +10
  • Bloodborne sales pass 1m in under two weeks

  • Rogueywon 14/04/2015

    I completed the game without finding it all that difficult - Dark Souls was harder.

    But the responses to moroboshi's post illustrate a hell of a lot about what's wrong with the Souls community in specific and broader gaming culture when it comes to talking about difficult games more generally.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 14/04/2015

    @Badoink Good for a game that is, as pretty much all of the reviews state, "not for everybody". Also good international sales for a Japanese game, by today's standards. Reply +25
  • Destiny's House of Wolves expansion has no new raid, Bungie confirms

  • Rogueywon 14/04/2015

    So as it reaches the point of being 9 months old, Destiny will still only have two raids? Indeed, there's no guarantee it will have its third by the time it hits its one-year anniversary?

    Add Bungie to the list of companies who released an MMO without understanding the scale and complexity of what they were undertaking and the sheer level of resource required to keep the content updates flowing.
    Reply +33
  • Legacy of the Void makes changes that won't appeal to all StarCraft 2 players

  • Rogueywon 14/04/2015

    It feels like a lot of the issues in the article might be arising from a combination of an author who is - by his own admission - rusty at the game meeting a particularly hardcore section of the community. Matches where you have two inexperienced players facing off against each other might flow very differently.

    But there's an interesting point about the extent to which developers explicitly choose to target the hardcore demographic. Historically, this has been a poor commercial move; Quake 3 was an early example of a multiplayer game that did this, and while it retains a loyal following today, it was generally seen as a commercial failure. Perhaps in a world where the unashamedly hardcore League of Legends has become as big as it has, companies are getting less wary about playing to that market?

    We've seen another example of it recently in a mostly single-player game - Dark Souls 2: Scholar of the First Sin. Whereas the other Souls games pitch their difficulty curve so as to give new players some time to gather steam before hitting their first wall, SotFS is very clearly only designed for people who have already beaten the game with its normal enemy placement. Genuinely new players will be completely overwhelmed and likely put off the game (and series) for good. With SotFS being the only way to play the game on PS4 and XB-One, and being marketed on Steam as the "technically better" version, that's a very risky strategy for From Software to have taken, and one that implies they're playing very much to an existing market, not trying to expand it.
    Reply +13
  • Xbox One UK price now £299.99

  • Rogueywon 13/04/2015

    @rayman Do German prices include sales tax, or is it like the US, where tax is added on at the point of purchase?

    Don't forget that UK sticker-on-the-box prices already include 20% sales tax.
    Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 13/04/2015

    @apoc_reg Don't forget you can route your TV digibox through it, which might save you the "extra HDMI" issue (I'm doing that with my Virgin Media box).

    Not much you can do about needing an extra plug socket, though.
    Reply +15
  • Strategy RPG mash-up Project X Zone 2 headed West

  • Rogueywon 13/04/2015

    These mash-up RPGs seem to be a big thing in Japan. I used to take an interest in them, but experience has taught that they almost always turn out to be pretty terrible games. Reply +1
  • How Bloodborne honours the legacy of H.P. Lovecraft

  • Rogueywon 11/04/2015

    @Mindstorm It's definitely not Lovecraft lite. It does the whole full-on existential despair and futility of Lovecraft at his bleakest.

    Which in fairness, the Souls series has always done as well.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 11/04/2015

    @Dysisa The more of the game's lore you uncover, the more obvious the Lovecraftian influences become. There's a useful - but MASSIVELY spoilery - lore-dump at http://www.kotaku.co.uk/2015/04/09/whats-really-going-on-in-bloodborne

    What I like about Bloodborne is that it doesn't channel the globe-spanning Lovecraft stories that games usually mine; the Call of Cthulhu, the Mountains of Madness and so on. There's a lot more of The Dunwich Horror and Herbert West Reanimator to it. Yharnam itself is a mix of crumbling Gothic and decayed New England backwater that feel like Lovecraft's Arkham taken to its final extreme.
    Reply +7
  • Jon Blyth on: Bloodborne

  • Rogueywon 11/04/2015

    @Astroguy Yes, but gaining insight involves going significantly off the beaten track at that point. Your average first-time player is never going to find it.

    And the shortcut involves getting most of the way to the first boss. As, in fact, does getting access to the route you need to find a Madman's Knowledge. And personally, I found the run to that boss much, much harder than the fight itself.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 11/04/2015

    @Zerobob They are in the early areas - much less so once you move beyond them. Once you hit the half-way point, having to go back every so often and do a big loop from the Central Yharnam lamp to farm vials will become a regular thing. Reply +5
  • Rogueywon 11/04/2015

    It certainly takes a lot of courage these days to say bad things about a hard game. Doing so in comments is often a recipe to get voted down. There is definitely a "thing" in gaming culture about somehow proving yourself a "real" gamer by professing your love for hardest games around.

    The funny thing is, I'm not sure how comfortable I'd have felt writing the above if I hadn't finished Bloodborne. And all three of the Souls games (Dark and Dark 2 on NG+ as well). On some level, a little part of my mind I don't like very much is telling me I've proven myself "man enough" to say these things.

    My feelings on Bloodborne having finished at are complex. It's rare I finish a game and still don't know what I thought about it. I love the aesthetic, the atmosphere and the lore. I love the looping, branching world design, which manages to do "Metroidvania" without a cheap reliance on doling out new gadgets.

    But my god the game makes some brutal mis-steps. Even as a Souls veteran, it took me over 4 hours to reach the Cleric Beast. Once there, I was back on familiar territory and killed it first go. But that run to it - with no lanterns and - until you get almost right to the very end - no shortcuts is an appalling thing. The worst part is that they don't allow you to level up or upgrade your weapons at this point - and for every serious run you make at getting through the area, you're going to have to do a couple just to farm blood vials and molotovs. It's a terrible introduction to the game and many players who might have found something here to love will never get past it.

    I also don't like the demand that every player conforms to a single combat style. The great thing in the Souls games was the range of options you had. You crafted your character around a toolkit you liked and you made your way through the game with that. Bloodborne has much, much less flexibility. There is only really one way to play the game. So much for replay value.

    And then there are the technical issues. The framerate stutters that hit you at the worst possible moment. The occasional input lag that throws your timing for a dodge-roll or a gun-stun. The camera that jumps targets and loses focus at random. These have always been issues in Souls games (except for the framerate one on PC), but they're just that much harder to forgive in such a fast paced game. And then there are the load times...

    The funny thing is, the game gets much easier as you get further into it. Lanterns get more closely clustered and boss fights tend to fall into familiar patterns. But those early sections are going to put off so many people.

    At least it's better than Scholar of the First Sin, which takes a good-but-not-great game and, through a barrage of willy-waving sadism, makes it borderline unplayable.
    Reply +28
  • Does Scholar of the First Sin make Dark Souls 2 worth returning to?

  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    @Old_Books I think the worst thing about Bloodborne is that it's exposed Miyazaki as a purist-bore.

    You know those people who drone on and on about the "right" way to play a Souls game and who rag on people who might, for instance, decide to go as a caster on their first playthrough? The people to whom, until Bloodborne, the answer always was: "If From Software wanted you to play the game a particular way, they wouldn't put all those options in the game".

    After Bloodborne, it's plainly obvious that Miyazaki does think there's a "right" way to play his games. And that's unfortunate.

    Bloodborne accommodates only a single play style - the fast melee style. For a single playthrough, that's only irritating rather than a deal breaker. But whereas upon finishing earlier Souls games, the first thing I've done is create a different character to try a different play-style, now that I've finished Bloodborne, I feel no particular compulsion to go back to it.
    Reply +6
  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    @Timmy_Toldrum DS2 is definitely a lot less "show don't tell" than the other Souls games. Scholar of the First Sin takes that even further - you have a long expository intro now (which I don't remember from DS2-base) and a lot more random lore scattered around. They've kept the idea that most of the lore comes from fragments of text and item descriptions, but there's so much more of it that Dranglaic ends up with a lot less mystique than Lordran (or Yharnham, to be fair).

    Contrast that with the presentation of The Painted World of Ariamis in DS1, which I still consider the peak of the Souls' series storytelling. That gives you just about enough to get a sense for the shape and nature of the world, but leaves a lot of room for interpretation and filling in the blanks.
    Reply +7
  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    Demon's Souls brought the formula onto modern hardware, Dark Souls perfected it, Dark Souls 2 proved you can have a bit too much of a good thing and Bloodborne goes too far in streamlining.

    Don't get me wrong, Dark Souls 2 was one of the better games of recent years. But in every significant way in which it deviates from its predecessor's formula, it makes things worse, not better. The reduced health on death mechanic should have been allowed to die with Demon's Souls; it discourages experimentation and detracts from the sense of fairness that so brilliantly balances out Dark Souls's difficulty. The weapon durability changes felt clumsy, over-burdensome and never really seemed to serve any purpose beyond random sadism. The boss fights included too many examples of "big guy in armour with a fast combo attack and a slow charged attack" and too few startlingly different experiences. I'm a couple of hours into Scholar of the First Sin now and it hasn't really improved things. It's a game slightly too much in love with its own reputation for being unforgiving.
    Reply +33
  • Diablo 3 patch 2.2 out, turns Legendary items up to 11

  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    Feels like every time I get bored enough with this game that I drift away from playing it, they bring out a patch that adds just about enough new stuff to bring me back.

    Though this time it has Pillars of Eternity and War for the Overworld to compete with for my time (finished Bloodborne on Monday), which will take some doing.
    Reply +9
  • Are Pokémon Rumble World's microtransactions a shakedown?

  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    Destructoid have a more detailed review up, the conclusions of which boil down to: "It's not a shakedown, but it's a fairly dull game". Reply +2
  • Winners might use drugs

  • Rogueywon 08/04/2015

    I remember once taking a mind-altering substance to affect my performance in a game - alcohol!

    This was back in the relatively early days of Final Fantasy XI. To raise the level cap from 70 to 75 (the final limit at the time, and for quite a few years afterwards), you had to win a 1-on-1 fight with an NPC named Maat. Before you were allowed to challenge him, you had to farm a rare drop from a high level zone - which would involve roping together a group of people willing to help you - which could take an hour or more in itself.

    The fight itself was a huge damage-race. It was slightly different for the healer class (which got an easier version), but for most classes it was a toe-to-toe slugfest, which even deprived you of your subjob abilities. He could take you down in a few seconds and there wasn't much you could do about it other than taking him down first. The class I was doing this as - Ranger - had a very specific strategy for winning, which involved very quickly and very precisely triggering a sequence of macros to trigger the right use of abilities and consumables. Timing was critical - too fast and commands wouldn't trigger, too slow and you'd die before you finished - meaning you had to go and get a group to farm another rare drop to try again.

    I failed 3 times, because nerves meant that I was flubbing my command entries by hitting the macro sequences too fast. So on the fourth attempt, before I enter the fight, I drink two cans of beer. I wait 10 minutes after finishing, go into the fight and pull off a perfect victory. Basically just because two beers had been enough to take the edge off my nerves.

    Only time I ever had to do that. Considered it for Ornstein and Smough in Dark Souls on my first playthrough, but you can't really afford any kind of reaction penalty there.
    Reply +4
  • Bloodborne director reveals his favourite boss from the "Souls" series

  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    Crossbreed Priscilla from Dark Souls's Painted World of Ariamis. A neat invisibility/footsteps mechanic. Plus interesting lore that made you feel quite guilty if you chose to fight her. Reply +9
  • The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt to receive two major expansions

  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    If the quoted playtimes are accurate, then I've no problem with this. I've been happily buying expansion packs for more than two decades now and would rather pay a moderate price for a big chunk of content than get nickel-and-dimed for tiny add-ons.

    I still remember the days when it was considered scandalous that Icewind Dale's expansion only added 6-8 hours of play-time - to the extent that we ended up with a free "expansion to the expansion" that added a few more hours on top of that.
    Reply +13
  • Bloodborne bug makes game easier if left running too long

  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    @riceNpea My general rule became "if it's human-sized, use camera lock, if it's not, then don't". Vicar Amelia, Darkbeast Paarl and the Moon Presence are almost impossible with camera lock enabled and fairly easy with it switched off.

    But this is the problem I referred to in my early (downvoted) post. Most of the bosses in this game are variations on one of two themes. Either "human-sized hunter with a move-set similar to the player's" or "large, fast moving monster with a move-set of almost-entirely frontal swipes". There are a couple of different ones to add variety, but not many. Once you can deal with those two archetypes, you can deal with most of what the game throws at you.

    Though it's not as bad as Dark Souls 2, with its constant parade of "big dude in armour with a fast combo-strike and a slow charge-strike".
    Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 06/04/2015

    Finished this a couple of hours ago, without any play-sessions long enough to trigger the bug.

    The game gets much easier in the final stages. That's probably partly a case of me adjusting to the combat style after working the Dark Souls hangups out of my system. But it's also quite easy to get over-levelled, and many of the late bosses are just variants on early ones.

    It's also a bit short. Playtime of 28 hours for my playthrough, and that included optional areas and bosses, plus the "true end".

    It's a good game, but I don't think it's a patch on Dark Souls. If I were to rank the From Software games, it would be Dark 1 -> Demon's -> Bloodborne -> Dark 2.

    Mark out of 10? Probably an 8 from me.
    Reply -10
  • Tomb Raider reboot has sold 8.5m copies

  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    Good sales performance - and nice to see a game which breaks the trend of "it's only first-week sales that matter".

    But as to whether it disappointed S-E or not... don't forget that this came out at a time when a lot of companies were going to their shareholders with entirely unrealistic sales estimates - despite the fact that year on year games sales were actually trending down (partly due to the closing out of the last console generation and partly - strange though it seems - due to the end of the recession). I remember Capcom coming out with some completely implausible estimates for Resident Evil 6.

    Lots of people were seeing the kind of ludicrous numbers that games like Call of Duty were doing and assuming that this meant they could equal those sales. I think there's generally more realism about that now than there was a couple of years ago.
    Reply +2
  • Square Enix tones down Mobius Final Fantasy's "too sexy" leading man

  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    @RPTGB We've already had that unfortunate Borat image linked in this thread, but I sometimes feel that since about 2010 or so, Square-Enix have had that other Sacha Baron Cohen creation - Bruno - running the show.

    With the notable and noble exception of Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, almost any interview with the creative people at Square-Enix these days seems to move very rapidly into lengthy digressions on characters' costumes. The development process for Final Fantasy 13 was apparently "a bunch of artists sit around creating assets and talking about aesthetics for years, then somebody codes a bare-bones game to string it together at the last minute. Some of the recent stuff on FF15 and Kingdom Hearts 3 has been beyond parody.

    They only saved FF14 by bringing in an actual games designer to take it over.
    Reply +7
  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    @MrDurandPierre Political oversight? What political oversight?

    Expecting a Japanese games developer to be up-to-speed on the latest trends in radical US campus culture is a bit excessive, don't you think?
    Reply +9
  • Rogueywon 07/04/2015

    If Square-Enix spent less time worrying about outfits and more time worrying about gameplay, then Final Fantasy 13 might have been a better game and Kingdom Hearts 3 might not be stuck off somewhere in the unimaginably distant future. Reply +18
  • MSI GS30 Shadow with Gaming Dock review

  • Rogueywon 05/04/2015

    I always worry about longevity with devices like this. I know it's unscientific, but when a laptop is having to work this hard to keep itself cool when doing even basic tasks, the odds that "something will go wrong" sooner rather than later just feel scary. Reply +3
  • Chris Donlan on: Bloodborne, Montauk, and travels beyond genre

  • Rogueywon 04/04/2015

    @marijnlems The Souls games are difficult (in my view), but what sets them aside from a lot of other difficult games is that they are mostly "fair". It's very rare in a Souls game that you take a death that isn't directly linked to something that you did which was clearly unwise with hindsight.

    And I suspect this is what "the game asks a lot from the player" means. You get better at the Souls games by careful study of the enemies and the environment. You can't do the old RPG trick of just going away and levelling up for a while (you can do it and it may help a little, but it won't let you brute-force milestone fights). You have to train yourself to be better at the game.

    The contrast here is, I suspect, with those RPGs which just say "you won't be able to beat the next boss until you've done an hour of random encounters to level up".
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