Rogueywon Comments

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  • Star Wars: Commander is your next Star Wars game

  • Rogueywon 21/08/2014

    @Spuzzell We're amassing a good collection of box-quotes here, aren't we?

    I'm prepared to release all rights to my "rather gargle with my own diarrhoea" quote so that Disney may use it in their own marketing freely. Would you be prepared to do the same with the "lick a tramp's balls" one?
    Reply +3
  • Rogueywon 21/08/2014

    I would rather gargle with my own diarrhoea.

    All it needs now is Jar Jar.
    Reply +7
  • Performance Analysis: Diablo 3 at 1080p on Xbox One

  • Rogueywon 19/08/2014

    @Bauul The biggest hardware disparity was probably the N64/PS1 generation - when the hardware and storage-format differences between platforms was so vast that multi-platform development pretty much died beyond a bit of PS1/PC cross-over. Reply +1
  • Rogueywon 19/08/2014

    "We did find it challenging early on to get it to 1080p. That's why we made the decision to drop to 900. That's what we demoed and were showing around E3 time. And Microsoft was just like, 'This is unacceptable. You need to figure out a way to get a better resolution.' So we worked with them directly, they gave us a code update to let us get to full 1080p."
    That's the most interesting block of text in the whole article (not to disparge the rest of the article, which is informative). It is a good demonstration of how concerned MS are about the ongoing narrative of an underpowered Xbox One and its impact upon sales.

    The irony, of course, is that in most cases, performance differences are tiny and won't be noticed by the average user. But the narrative, as MS has learned too late in this generation, can be everything.
    Reply +5
  • Hellgate is back - as a Steam Greenlight pitch

  • Rogueywon 19/08/2014

    The old game was an interesting experiment with some fairly neat fiction behind it, but the execution was pretty awful, with the shooting mechanics in particular being flat and unsatisfying. A lot of the same gameplay principles would later be applied much more successfully in the Borderlands series. Reply +2
  • Watch Dogs is Ubisoft's last mature game for Wii U

  • Rogueywon 19/08/2014

    @spamdangled It may sound patronising to you, but he is speaking on behalf of a major publisher with sales data to back up what he is saying.

    Assuming all 6 million Wii-U owners are happy is also a pretty patronising assumption. I own one, but regret the purchase. It spends most of its time un-used.
    Reply +18
  • Microsoft discussing Xbox Entertainment Studios sale with Warner Bros. - report

  • Rogueywon 15/08/2014

    Probably linked to http://www.kotaku.co.uk/2014/08/15/xbox-changing-dudebro-image

    The Dudebro market is, like the non-gamer one that Nintendo pursued with the Wii, an unreliable one. Dudebros don't walk away from their gaming like the novelty-crowd who bought Wiis did, but they don't actually give much of a shit about the things that a new console generation has to offer a core gaming audience.

    If they've got their FIFA/Madden (delete as appropriate to region) roster updates and their annual Call of Duty/Battlefield (delete as appropriate to preferred flavour of spunkgargleweewee) they're happy. With those big franchises not leaving the 360/PS3 any time soon (the sports franchises stayed on the PS2 many years into the last generation), the Dudebro market isn't particularly interested in much else.

    Xbox Entertainment Studios was always part of the pitch to get the Dudebro market to spend more money on their consoles and jump to the new consoles when available. That strategy's looking like a bust now.
    Reply +2
  • Video: Road Redemption is a fun, erratic homage to a 90s classic

  • Rogueywon 15/08/2014

    Given some of the early difficulties in getting this project off the ground, I'm pleasantly surprised it looks as good as it does.

    Not into the the whole "roguelike" thing, though. It's been done to death (and beyond) recently.
    Reply +3
  • RollerCoaster Tycoon World headed to PC in early 2015, first teaser shown

  • Rogueywon 15/08/2014

    "Microtransaction-free" is enough to keep my attention. If this actually starts to look like a proper full-featured game, then it might get my cash as well.

    But the fear still has to be of a gutted Simcity-style online game (Simcity was also microtransaction-free).
    Reply +3
  • Radiant Silvergun and Ikaruga creator working on new PS4 game

  • Rogueywon 15/08/2014

    Good stuff... definitely on my "one to watch for" list.

    Though part of me would also like some new shooters in the Western rather than the Japanese tradition. So something like a new Tyrian - heavier on the ludicrous weapon upgrades, lighter on the bullet hell and one-hit-death mechanics.
    Reply +2
  • Pinball FX2 finally available on Xbox One

  • Rogueywon 14/08/2014

    Good stuff.

    Not much more to say on this one, really.
    Reply +5
  • It's time for your latest update on The Last Guardian - again

  • Rogueywon 13/08/2014

    Sounds like a variant on the problem that bedeviled Daikatana, Prey and Duke Nukem Forever - game development moving slower than technological development, such that the dev team, who want to put out a "top end" game in terms of visuals, feel they need to start from scratch on a new engine at regular intervals.

    That cycle rarely ends well.
    Reply +2
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider is coming to both Xbox One and Xbox 360

  • Rogueywon 13/08/2014

    @Haroldinho41 Never happened with Blue Dragon or Lost Odyssey. Both of which (LO in particular) were good reasons to own a 360 during the early part of the last cycle when RPGs were scarce. Reply -1
  • BioWare Austin unveils four-on-one online RPG Shadow Realms

  • Rogueywon 13/08/2014

    @spamdangled Actually, most of them vanish into page-378-on-the-app-store obscurity and are never seen again.

    There are a small number that are probably sustainable - the really big MOBAs, for instance, which tone down their pay-to-win elements and compensate through sheer size of player base. But the days of "spend 6.99 to buy gems or wait 24 hours until you can do anything in-game" are nearly over.

    Thank god.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 13/08/2014

    @Oli No, I suspect not...

    The free-to-play/pay-to-win boom is no longer "impending". It is now "happening". King just lost almost a quarter of its share-price overnight due to tumbling revenues. This is being carried prominently in the mainstream media this morning - http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/aug/12/candy-crush-king-digital-shares-tank-sinking-popularity - slightly surprised to see little coverage in the gaming press so far.

    Also in recent weeks, EA has shut down Mythic - its leading free-to-play/pay-to-win studio and is suspending services for Ultima Forever. At both ends of the market - the new companies who started out in the pay-to-win model and the established companies who jumped on the bandwaggon - the model is starting to fail, and fail hard.

    By the time the first Shadow Realms episode is ready for release, I think there will be few left wanting to touch the pay-to-win model.
    Reply +3
  • Diablo 3: Ultimate Evil edition review

  • Rogueywon 12/08/2014

    The legendary item drop rates referenced in the review sound broadly in line with how the PC version is now - the rate was doubled a few weeks ago. Reply +4
  • If Early Access comes to consoles: Developers respond

  • Rogueywon 12/08/2014

    @Skirlasvoud Yeah, I was thinking about the 1980s gaming crash just a couple of days ago, while browsing the "new releases" list on Steam. So many titles, so many of them unfinished or of low quality. Something is going to give - and give soon.

    But the funny thing is, I suspect that this time, the crash may be largely invisible from outside the industry. I think the big publishers and well known and respected developers (and yes, I do include EA and Activision here) will come through mostly unscathed. They're already cutting some of the fat associated with the worst excesses of the pay-to-win boom (see EA closing down the developers of the Dungeon Keeper and Ultima pay-to-win games) and their triple-A ranges are generally doing just fine. Similarly, I don't expect the CD Projekts or the From Softwares around the middle of the market to experience much pain. For them, the pain came in the last generation and the ones who have survived it seem fairly well placed going forwards.

    The crash this time will be at the lower end of the market - the PC indie-market and the mobile gaming market. We'll see a lot of smaller shops going bust spectacularly over the next 2 years or so. Some, such as the nasty Android/iOS spamware makers will be absolutely no loss to anybody. But chances are some good and creative indie studios are going to become collateral damage as well.

    If you are a good indie developer, your biggest enemy right now isn't some mythical "man" or "powers that be" keeping you down. It is the other indie developers flooding the market with unfinished or low quality garbage.
    Reply +7
  • Rogueywon 12/08/2014

    @Murton True... but at least when EA or its ilk drops a clanger, like it did with Battlefield 4, if enough community pressure is brought to bear on them, they do at least have the resources to fix it.

    The problem with a lot of the smaller and indie studios who use open access is that, as with some Kickstarter projects, if their project goes wrong and they can't finish it, then that's it, end of story. No compensation (because the creators don't have any money left to compensate with), nobody there to step in and finish or fix the game.

    Steam needs to rewind its policies a bit and be a bit heavier handed in its curatorship. The consoles should stay out of this area altogether.
    Reply +8
  • Sega agrees to $1.25m settlement in Aliens: Colonial Marines case

  • Rogueywon 12/08/2014

    Though the odd thing is... I played through Colonial Marines at release and hated it. But a friend of mine picked it up in the Steam summer sale and talked me into going back to it for a co-op playthrough... and it wasn't actually bad.

    Post release patches have fixed most of the glaring technical issues picked up in the EG review. They can't compensate for the poor writing and design, but the game felt much more like a 6/10 than a 3/10 now.

    High praise indeed!
    Reply +27
  • After 14 years John Romero is working on another shooter

  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    Actually, one way in which Romero was ahead of his time. The emphasis on "focus on content, let other people develop the engine technology".

    That's been a successful business model for a lot of developers in recent years. Unfortunately, back in the days of Ion Storm, engines were moving through the generations much faster. The transition between id engines (and the introduction of Unreal engines alongside them) was terrifyingly fast at the time and unless you could develop your game for the engine you'd licensed incredibly quickly, you'd end up with an obsolete game. Porting to new engines spelled doom for Daikatana, with Prey and Duke Nukem Forever falling into the same trap.

    Valve escaped it, because when the Quake 2 engine came out (and they had most of a game developed on the Quake 1 engine), rather than port to the new (very different) engine, they found some work-arounds to incorporate some of the Quake 2 engine's visual tricks onto the Quake 1 engine code-base, creating the remarkably successful bastardisation that was the Half-Life engine.
    Reply +11
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    I can't leave without my buddy Superfly.

    So many memories.

    To be fair, I bought Daikatana and it had some interesting ideas. The second and third episodes (out of four) were fairly passable fps fare, where the NPC companions weren't getting in the way. Unfortunately, the first episode, with its Lame Healing Fruit and Green Semen Frogs was so bad that I suspect most people never played past it.

    The Somethingawful demo review remains a classic.
    Reply +6
  • Diablo 3 download/install sizes are much higher on PS4

  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    @Innocent_Bystander Also, beware of the very large low-price-point consumer HDDs. The big Seagates, in particular, are a nightmare in terms of reliability. Unless you're willing to pay the premium for Enterprise-level kit, buying the largest HDDs on the market to store anything you particularly care about is a huge risk. Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    @labtoy I can confirm the PC version is indeed less than 256gb. :) Reply +10
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    @TheVoice Your question could also be put as "how many people want to have more than 8-10 full-sized games available to play without a lengthy reinstall/redownload at any one time".

    Ok, for the "FIFA/Madden and Call of Duty/Battlefield only" crowd, it's not much of an issue. But for people with a more rounded taste in games, the limit is going to get increasingly painful, especially as game sizes tend to grow across a generation.
    Reply +7
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    @Seafort PC System requirements on hdd space often include the overhead that you should leave your operating system on an otherwise full system drive. Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    Random musings ahead...

    Funny how HDD sizes have evolved, really. More so than any other component, every time I've tried to stay ahead of the curve on them, I've failed.

    The first family PC (1989) had a 40mb HDD. That was ok at the time, with most games coming on a single 3.5" or 5.25" disc. Then Wing Commander and its ilk came along, with multi-disk installs and a whopping 8-10 meg space requirement.

    The next PC (1993) had a 200mb HDD. This was ok for quite a while, but then CD-Rom games came along. The first few PC CD-Rom games only needed tiny installs, but increasingly, they insisted on moving files off the disc and onto the HDD. Install sizes became 30, 40, 50mb. We added a 300mb secondary, but that was just a stopgap.

    The next PC (1996) - the first I bought myself - had a 1gb HDD. I remember the first time I did a "dir /w" in DOS and saw a gig free... fairly jawdropping moment. But the install sizes continued to creep up. 100mb was not unknown now. A 2 gig secondary was eventually added - just in time for the first 200+mb install. Towards the end of this PC's lifespan, Baldur's Gate came out. Yes, it had smaller install options available, but to avoid endless disc swapping, you needed an install size equivalent to the total capacity of my largest HDD.

    Its successor (1999) had an 8gb drive, which, being one of the infamous IBM "Deathstars" died after a couple of months and was replaced with a 20gb. Just 3 or 4 years earlier, that would have been unimaginable. Now, it was just about enough for a dozen games. Most CD-Rom games were now insisting on full installs and multi-CD games were on the horizon. I put a couple of secondaries into that machine, but it was a losing battle.

    After that, the next new-build PC (2001 - the previous PC had a major heat-death incident) I made had a 120gb drive. Some games were now coming on DVD and insisting on 3 or 4 gb installs. Plus downloadable video was now on the scene and clogging up space. I got my first non-university broadband connection shortly after getting this PC (a massive 0.5mbit) and, just before it was retired, Steam launched.

    Next PC (2004)... 500gb off the bat. Lasted about 6 months before I had to add another identical drive as a secondary. Most games during this period were still bought DVD hard-copy, but download games were starting to creep in around the edges. Hard-copy games almost inevitably needed full installs anyway.

    And then the next one (2007)... a pair of 1TB drives (which cost an absolute fortune at the time). Steam was on the warpath now and installs regularly over 10gb. After that (2010)... a pair of 2TB drives. Both full within 9 months of purchase. Didn't buy a single hard-copy PC game for that PC.

    And today (2013 machine)... 500gb SSD for the OS and a few hard-drive heavy games (eg. FF14), with 3tb and 4tb storage drives. For now, I'm ok on space. For now.

    Is there a point to this long and somewhat rambling post? Sort of... Both current gen consoles have a HDD size equivalent to what I had in a PC I bought in 2004... despite the fact that game install sizes for them are, on average, 10x what they were on PC at the time (30-60 gigs now, as opposed to 3-6 gigs then). In short, all but the most patient gamers with current versions of the XBOne and PS4 will end up having to buy more HDD capacity for them sooner rather than later.
    Reply +50
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    @kingdumpalot Is an uncapped package available where you live? If so, the obvious answer is to trade up to it. A lot of PC gamers have done that over the last few years due to Steam and I suspect the time has now come where a lot of console gamers will choose to follow suit.

    Of course, there are areas (though generally not in the UK) where uncapped packages just aren't available for home users, in which case... ouch.

    By and large, the sooner governments recognise broadband as a utility (like power, water, phone etc) rather than a luxury, the better.
    Reply +8
  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    Good god, that is an insane install size. Chalk up a victory for the XBOne this time?

    I wonder what the new console generation will mean for ISPs? Until recently, bandwidth usage like this was the preserve of businesses and hardcore pirates.
    Reply +4
  • Destiny's beta characters are being wiped

  • Rogueywon 11/08/2014

    People have a really weird attitude towards betas these days.

    A beta is a test-build of a game which is used to identify flaws and bugs and to generate live-feedback, to enable final fixes and changes to be made pending a final release.

    A beta is not a demo, a way of getting your hands on a completed game early, a free copy of a game or a way of getting a "head start" on other players once a game is formally released.

    I don't, for the most part, "do" betas myself. I would rather not spend what gaming time I have playing games which are, by their very nature, unfinished and buggy. Convincing players that beta testing is a privalege is one of the greatest cons that the modern gaming industry has managed to pull.
    Reply +3
  • "The transformation was painful. We paid the price"

  • Rogueywon 08/08/2014

    My god...

    First of all, kudos to EG for the interview. No punches pulled on the questions - a welcome break from the usual "please tell us how great you are" exercises that passes for an interview in gaming journalism.

    But oh my word that guy comes over as a very, very nasty piece of work. And I wonder whether he's cleared his answers with lawyers before he gave some of them. Because he appears to have said that the company had the ability to pay salaries (at the cost of its continued viability) but chose not to do so.

    To be clear, a company has a contractual relationship with its staff and is obliged by lawe to pay them. If a company fails and goes into administration with salaries unpaid, then employees go onto the list of creditors to be dealt with in administration (where they may or may not get any money out - they come quite a way down the list of creditors, though still above end-customers).

    But in this case, Crytek was not in administration and, taking this interview at face value, made a conscious decision to breach legally binding contracts. You cannot default on a contract because doing so would put you out of business; you have to go out of business first and then let the administrators decide how to manage your contract defaults.

    If I was one of the former Crytek UK employees (now working for a company in different ownership), I'd certainly be taking legal advice at this point.

    Of course, the interviewee might be getting the sequence of events wrong - but that's why you clear these lines with a lawyer first.
    Reply +38
  • Xbox One Diablo 3 will now also run at 1080p

  • Rogueywon 08/08/2014

    @MaxiSleep Though all the people who bought Titanfall, despite its many technical shortcomings, would appear to disagree with you. Reply +8
  • Rogueywon 08/08/2014

    I confess that I find the difference between 900p and 1080p difficult to spot in some types of game, despite being a fully signed up member of the PC Master Race.

    But for something like Diablo 3, with a fixed perspective and zoom level, resolution is more likely to have actual gameplay impacts. In which case, this is a very serious step up.
    Reply +8
  • Xbox One launch title Ryse: Son of Rome announced for PC

  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @MTM2 Agree that the neg button should go.

    But would go even further and say that in a proper forum system "disagree" would not equate to "neg" anyway.

    Slashdot tries to enforce this, first by requiring a reason next to up and down moderations, with the downvote options being "over-rated", "troll" and "flamebait" and second by having a meta-moderation system, whereby moderations are themselves moderated and users who abuse the system can lose the ability to up and downvote.

    But to be honest, it doesn't work very well over there. Any post critical of Nintendo or Apple inevitably ends up at -1 (the lowest possible on their system) no matter how well-written or argued.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    I own the Xbox One version. Frankly, if you have been desperately waiting for a PC version, all I can say is "don't bother". It's a lazy, by-the-numbers hack and slash without any of the style, ingenuity or panache that characterises something like God of War 3 or the original Castlevania: Lord of Shadows.

    There's not much actually bad about it, beyond the really poor voice recognition (seriously, Xbox One voice recognition normally works really well for me, but in this game it's just broken), but it is utterly devoid of anything that makes it genuinely engaging or enjoyable.

    Edit: Plus at some point, it's inevitable that MS will put a "full sized" Xbox One game on their Games With Gold offer and I would bet money on the first such title being this. Just as the first "full sized" PS4 Playstation Plus title will almost certainly be Knack.
    Reply +31
  • How to transfer Diablo 3 saves to Ultimate Evil Edition

  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @paulf Actually, double check that I'm right before you cancel anything. I've just had one of those "is that really true or did I just dream it" moments. Last time I had one of those it was about my socks coming to life and chasing me through a field of lobsters.

    But the loot system has definitely been patched to be more console-like.
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @paulf The loot system for the PC version was patched heavily just before the expansion - it is now very similar to the console version. Indeed, the PC version now has controller support.

    There are still enough little differences between the versions that cross-platform play feels unlikely. But I wouldn't rule out PS4/PC play forever.
    Reply -1
  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @Malek86 It's not really for Sony to actively change it; they've no incentive to make their own first party games cross-platform (them being PS-exclusive and whatnot). It's more that they don't put the blocks in the way of developers who want to do it in the same way that MS do. I gather that when Square-Enix approached MS about FF14, the response was that MS would insist on 360/XboxOne players being hived off on their own servers. Sony, however, had no objection to cross-server play.

    Technical issues like update timing are solvable. I gather Square-Enix have always got around it by having the game contained within a separate wrapper (PlayOnline), which lets them push out updates on their own timetable. MS allowed that for FFXI, but it is the only time they've ever allowed it.

    The problem I suspect is that with one of the big three online platforms (PC, XBL, PSN - Nintendo don't count in this case) walled off from cross-platform play, there is just isn't enough of a commercial incentive for most developers to put the time and the effort into fixing those issues, given how tight development budgets are.
    Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @Malek86 Cross-brand multiplayer in more games would be lovely, but the scope for it appears limited to a bit of PS3/PS4/PC interaction for the immediate future.

    It has happened before; at least twice that I am aware of. Final Fantasy XI had cross-platform play between PC, PS2 and 360. But that was very early in the 360's lifespan, before most of the current MS policies around XBL is in existence. Indeed, the 360 version of FFXI is an odd beast which violates so many of MS's policies that it is nothing short of a miracle that it ever happened.

    The other big cross-platform experiment was Shadowrun, which had cross-play between PC and 360. However, Shadowrun is an fps and, as such, the experience of cross-platform play was utterly miserable for console players stuck on a controller.

    Sony remain, in theory, open to the idea of cross-platform play. Final Fantasy 14 is integrated between PC, PS3 and PS4, though console players would be extremely foolish to play without a USB keyboard. There are other games, particularly RPGs, where the theoretical obstacles to cross-platform play would appear low. Hell, even the control system limitation can be overcome; the PS3/PS4 and 360/Xbox-One all handle USB keyboard and mice just fine and a small number of games (Unreal 3, Counter-Strike GO on PS3) have made use of this.

    But MS's insistence on walling off XBL from everything else, combined with some of the tricky low-level technical issues (such as different framerate caps, internal rendering resolutions and handling of DLC) are likely to render it not worth the time and effort for most developers.
    Reply +1
  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    Clever stuff. Given how sensitive MS are about interaction between XBL and third-party networks these days (which, I gather, is the reason Final Fantasy 14 isn't on Xbox One), I can only imagine how difficult it must have been for Blizzard to negotiate this. Reply +8
  • Has Valve just soft-launched the Source 2 engine?

  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @cw- And most of HL2's outdoor sections are fairly illusory, relying on skybox tricks and the like. The player is herded down a relatively tight corridor, bounded by visible and invisible obstacles. There are a few side-areas to explore, but it's a long way from FarCry style "open" environments. Reply +12
  • Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies heads to Steam

  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @Resurrected-X460 The Valve we knew and adored so much knows that if it starts to compete with major publishers like Activision by putting out games like Half-Life 3 which would directly compete with their own products, it may lose some of them from its Steam service.

    On balance, particularly given I didn't much like Half-Life 2 (though I loved the original), I would rather Valve focus on making the Steam platform a success - particularly by going back to more active curation of it - rather than developing first person shooters.
    Reply 0
  • Sony is being sued for Killzone failing to deliver "native 1080p" multiplayer

  • Rogueywon 07/08/2014

    @midnight_walker Those EULAs have been shown to be unenforcable in quite a few jurisdictions already.

    Which doesn't mean that this guy isn't an idiot.

    Though more broadly, you'd be surprised how much stuff in the average EULA has been ruled unenforcable in significant chunks of the world. Companies keep putting the clauses in question in for two reasons: 1) deterrent effect and 2) the chance that a court in a territory where they haven't yet been tested might side with them.
    Reply +6
  • Wing Commander 3 is free right now on Origin

  • Rogueywon 06/08/2014

    @udat You finished the game by... not beating that mission!

    It's a no-win-scenario mission. It's almost impossible to take out the enemy bombers in time and even if you do manage it (just about doable on the lowest difficulty with cheats enabled) the Behemoth explodes anyway after a set time.

    And then the plot continues. And you can still win the game.

    But you're not alone in being confused by this. Playing it for the first time in my mid-teens I also spent an entire evening trying to find a way to beat the mission.
    Reply 0
  • Blizzard downplays latest World of Warcraft subscriber fall

  • Rogueywon 06/08/2014

    @George-Roper What drove me out of hardcore play towards the end of the Lich King era was Blizzard's insistance that people play the game exactly as they intended it. I got sick to death of patch notes which read "we've fundamentally redesigned this class because we didn't like how people were playing it" or "we're changing how raids work because we've decided we didn't like the old system, which we only implemented a few months ago".

    In every aspect of the game, from the economy to class-balance to raids, Blizzard had a constant need to keep absolute control and to keep making change for the sake of change.

    I much prefer the Square-Enix approach. When players found unexpected ways to play Final Fantasy XI (for instance, by finding ways to make the Ninja job work as a tank, rather than the damage dealer it was intended to be) they allowed for it and adjusted their own approach to adding new content. Class balance changes were extremely rare and generally only made in extreme circumstances. Similarly in Final Fantasy XIV, they've hived PvP stats off completely from PvE, so that they can tweak PvP balance as needed without inflicing constant inconvenience on PvE players.
    Reply +6
  • Rogueywon 06/08/2014

    @iainmarchant1 Really? I've been out of the game since shortly after the Pandaria launch (and was only a sporadic casual player since late Lich King anyway) so I hadn't noticed.

    But I'd have thought it would have been bigger news.
    Reply 0
  • Rogueywon 06/08/2014

    This is neither surprising nor cause for concern. Most MMOs spend most of their lifespans with a slowly declining user-base. The normal pattern is for rapid growth in the 6 months or so after launch, then a period of stability, then a much longer period, often a decade or more of decline. And the funny thing is that the decline phase is often the most profitable part (development costs tend to be much lower, as new content is being created with existing tools, but the game is no longer being fundamentally over-hauled).

    Many, many subscription MMOs have done very well for their creators on this basis; Ultima Online, Everquest, Dark Ages of Camelot and Final Fantasy XI probably the most successful examples. That WoW didn't enter its decline phase until the Cataclysm era (and even then did so hesitently) is a remarkable feat.

    At some point, WoW will need to begin the gradual process of server merges etc that go with managed decline - and inevitably people will shout that this is the end of the world. But it isn't - and short of a true game-changing MMO coming along that eats WoW's breakfast, I wouldn't be surprised if the game was still running and still profitable 10 years from now.
    Reply +12
  • GameStop is drastically simplifying its trade-in values

  • Rogueywon 06/08/2014

    @d0x This is where it gets perverse... fantastic games, on average, trade in for less. Why? Because being good games, they tend to sell a lot of copies, meaning there are a lot in circulation, meaning they are never in short supply. When I traded in my 360 library earlier in the year (as I was picking up an Xbox One), my limited edition steelbox editions of the Gears of War series averaged less than 30p each.

    Games with relatively limited print runs always tend to trade in for more. The highest trade-in value I've ever had (25) was for, of all things, the original Hyperdimension Neptunia - which had a deserved 2/10 review from Eurogamer.
    Reply 0
  • Video: To the moon with Borderlands: The Pre-Sequel

  • Rogueywon 05/08/2014

    @INSERT-COIN I thought the PC version of the first game felt like a nasty console port, while the console versions of the second game felt like nasty PC ports.

    I absolutely loved the second game (PC version) and will happily take "more of the same".
    Reply +2
  • Rogueywon 05/08/2014

    @dirtysteve This being a Borderlands game (and hence loving nothing more than a good gaming in-joke), I suspect that Gearbox have been hard at work not only designing wizards to throw in as enemies, but building an entire wizard-themed level, full of wizardy wizardness. Reply +5
  • Resident Evil 1 remastered for PS4, Xbox One, PC, PS3 and Xbox 360

  • Rogueywon 05/08/2014

    Have always wanted to play this game, but found the controls and inventory system too painful. Guessing this won't help with the inventory system, but a redone control system might make it tolerable enough for me to get by. Reply +2