PlugMonkey Comments

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  • "We have to do better when we launch NX"

  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @geox30

    Yep! Wii - arm waving + portability + series link + couch game greatest hits = win.

    And obviously I'm not just pimping this idea as Nintendo's only hope of survival because it's what would make a perfect complimentary system for me. Oh no, nope, definitely not! :D
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    Even bigger chills than them dying on their arses attempting a seismic shift into the most crowded part of the market?

    Actually, yeah, I can respect that. Go down swinging Nintendo!

    That said, if the NX serves up portable couch gaming in the pub, I am so in. Then the 3rd party support they need to court is Rocket League and BroForce rather than AssCreed, but if they did it, I'd buy two!
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    No. The opposite. ;)

    A powerful console would mean a totally different hardware strategy, putting a large investment into powerful tech that they would probably end up having to sell at a loss to be competitively priced.

    A powerful console that wouldn't really increase the value or attractiveness of their own more colourful brand of family friendly games. You need power for realism, not cartoons.

    And getting 3rd party AAA games back(?) on their console in addition to their own ip would result in a system with a muddled marketing message. Many single console buyers who might be attracted by the 3rd party AAA games would not be as attracted to Nintendo's exclusive ip than their competitor's exclusive ip. Meanwhile, buyers attracted to Nintendo's colourful brand of family friendly fun would be put off by the high price of a powerful console.

    They would die on their arses.

    "Cheap, simple, fun" is what they should aim for. It's always been a core part of their make up. Sure it's more Gameboy than N64, but it's also the part of the market that two bigger, richer rivals haven't set up home in and come to completely dominate since the N64 glory days.

    "Nintendo NX. At home. On the go. Cheap. Simple. Fun."

    Boom. Done. Call me, Reggie.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    It's not about gaming pigeon holes, it's about branding. It's about people knowing where to go for what they want. It's about fashion. It's about cliques. More than anything, it's about focus. It’s hard enough to sell people on Nintendo and Xbox being ‘family friendly’ and ‘hardcore’ respectively. Neither can pull off being both.

    I disagree that most gamers enjoy a wide and diverse type of game. I think enthusiast gamers do, but enthusiast gamers will buy a Playstation/Xbox/PC and an NX. That's the ‘slightly different’ companion console market that the Wii leveraged and that I think the NX needs to catch a piece of alongside the more casual crowd.

    Do all your son’s friends enjoy such broad tastes? There is a huge swathe of the market for whom gaming is JUST Xbox or JUST Playstation, and Nintendo are all out of position to try and get them to switch to being JUST Nintendo. Getting AssCreed on their system wouldn’t be enough. Then they’d be left pitching Mario up to AssCreed fans against Uncharted and Halo in the face of a family friendly marketing message. :/

    They’d need an entirely different hardware strategy, an entirely different exclusive roster, an entirely different marketing message – one that doesn’t just echo what Sony and MS are already singing – and all that just to be late to the fight two much bigger bastards are already having over the same patch of land.

    They would die on their arses. AssCreed wouldn’t help them. Too much of everything else is out of alignment to get the people who care about it to buy into the rest of it.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    Nintendo are never going to appeal to the Assassin's Creed crowd. Everything about their current position and strengths is wrong. Splatoon sits perfectly alongside Mario and Zelda and Pokemon, Assassin's Creed never will.

    They can either find a slightly different market, like they did with the Wii and the DS, or they can go for the core market, become a weak Playstation / Xbox tribute act, and die on their arses.

    I don't think there is a third option.
    Reply 0
  • Dead Rising 4 is a good zombie game, but maybe not a good Dead Rising

  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    Aaaand another thing: one of the best bits in Dead Rising was when I was forced to improvise with whatever weapons I could lay my hands on, rather than just using my favourite double-booked mini-chainsaws for every single encounter. Without the timers, I would never have done that. The timers forced me to play in a more varied and interesting way than the slower, more risk-averse strategies I would no doubt have employed otherwise.

    Game designers very rarely put things into a game to deliberately ruin your fun. I generally find that if you go along with the direction they're trying to take you in instead of trying to fight it, a better overall experience lies in store. Clever folks, game designers. It often turns out they know their stuff.

    Dead Rising is the perfect example of this. First I didn't like it, then I went along with it, then I loved it. Now I want more games to do it.
    Reply +6
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @sarcasticjones

    Nah. Give them all guns and swords and tell them where to stand. Sorted.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    but despite a vast sea of zombies on screen, Dead Rising 4 never once conveys danger.
    So, in what way is it a good zombie game? By using zombies as the most unimaginative form of slaughter patsy?

    I agree with you on the timer though. I left Dead Rising on the Xbox 360 an agonising one survivor short of the perfect playthrough. I'll be buying it the moment it comes out on Steam to address that.

    Without the timer, you'd get the perfect playthrough first time, every time. I guess that's what a lot of people want these days, but I thoroughly enjoyed playing it just trying to save people, playing it again to follow the story, and then playing it again to try and do both. It felt like it was designed to support that, with all the unlocks and upgrades carrying over between goes, and it made an actual game of it.

    Having to choose between a story lead and someone's life was a great dilemma. I liked it much more than the standard approach where the world stops for me. In Oblivion I once left someone waiting in a sewer for me for about 3 months. When I came back, resplendent in glimmering glass armour, and he was still there pretending nothing had happened, it was just daft. A game not doing the standard, normal, boring thing was a fresh change. Make me not the god of the universe. Make me choose.
    Reply +3
  • Watch: Why I'm not sticking with No Man's Sky

  • PlugMonkey 25/08/2016

    @TheMasterJeef

    I have a very low tolerance for grindy games, but I don't find NMS a grind at all. I have no eye on my next whatever when I'm playing, it just find it really relaxing. Like visiting a national park.

    That's why I don't mind not being able to crash my ship, because that doesn't sound very relaxing. And I also don't mind that hardly any of the animals try to murder me up, because that doesn't sound very relaxing either.

    I think the problem is that if you do like grindy games, this isn't a very good one. This game has bad loot. It has good other things, but if you like loot, it has very bad loot.
    Reply +20
  • PlugMonkey 25/08/2016

    @rep-

    Exactly. The site's review is becoming more and more questionable.
    Some people like it. Some people don't like it. I like it. Oli likes it. Johnny doesn't like it.

    There's no shortage of 'consumer' information to allow people to decide if they would like it, like me and Oli, or not like it, like Johnny and Jim Sterling.

    No universal consensus needs to be reached. None of these opinions are 'questionable'. Me and Oli can like it, and you and Johnny and Jim Sterling can not like it, and these things can all happen at the same time.
    Reply +59
  • The Skyrim mod to Enderal

  • PlugMonkey 24/08/2016

    I'm really enjoying it. Shamelessly old skool, but in a good way. Reply 0
  • A new PC mod fixes one of No Man's Sky's most frustrating traits

  • PlugMonkey 23/08/2016

    @rep-

    Nearly as horrendous as the 81% drop in sales NMS experienced in week 2.
    It would be, if that wasn't entirely normal.

    Picking some big games at random from VGChartz, Uncharted 4 dropped 82.5% from week one to week two. MGSV was 81.9%. The everlasting omega-game that is GTA V dropped 81.8%.

    It sounds dramatic, but it's totes standard for hotly anticipated releases.
    Reply +13
  • PlugMonkey 23/08/2016

    @Aj64

    I wouldn't recommend it to most people, but would consider it an essential purchase to others.

    That's what makes something like '6/10' so completely useless. I don't think that accurately sums up the experience either group would have.

    Instead you just need an accurate enough description of the game to work out if you fall into the former camp or the latter.
    Reply +5
  • No Man's Sky's first post-launch patch is out now

  • PlugMonkey 23/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    From the moment you started touting the "You're just playing it wrong" line.
    All in your mind, dude. All in you mind.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 22/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    Round and round.

    Yes, but it's a very ambitious 'illusion' in its scale, diversity and aesthetics. One which a great many people are enjoying immersing themselves in a great deal, because they are not you, and they like different things to you.

    Round and round.

    Honestly, how many times are you going to say "but it's just a walking simulator" and have me reply "yes, it is. Some people like that"?

    Yes, it is. Some people like that.

    As these games go, this is the most ambitious one ever. To the people who like these sorts of games, that makes it a rare and wonderful thing.

    It's not that you're playing it wrong, it's just that you don't like it. Other people do like it. How fucking hard can that be to grasp?

    Round and round and round.

    Yes it is.

    Some people like that.

    Other people, who are not you, like things that you don't like.

    You not liking those things does not render them worthless or unambitious.

    Round and round.

    Yes it is.

    Some people like that.

    Round and round and round and round.

    I think this conversation is over, don't you?
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 22/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    So the only bit of NMS that does 'procedural' better than any other game
    No. It's the least best bit, but you still can't find something that does it better. Keep up.

    (even though your original comments stated that NMS as a single entity was the best procedurally generated game, not just the creatures bit)
    Again, no, I didn't say it's the best procedurally generated game. I said it has a very ambitious procedurally generated world that sets new standards for scale, diversity and aesthetics.

    That's really been my only point here. People can't revise NMS down to being unambitious just because they don't like the style of gameplay.

    Honestly, George, if you're not going to read my posts, I'm going to stop writing them.

    It's not supposed to be a screen saver and therein lays the flaw in your case.
    And it's not a screensaver, and therein lies the flaw in whatever the fuck it is you think you're presenting - basically that you have a very narrow perception of what a game can be and don't understand why people like things like NMS.

    'Challenge' isn't the only type of gameplay, it's just the most common, and the one you like. It's not the only one.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 21/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    'Fun' as in everyone is taking the piss out of them in hilarious youtube videos. And yet no-one can point to something that does it better. No, the randomise button an an RPG that produces slight variations of bipedal characters is not better.

    So what if NMS is 90% visual? It's a 'walking simulator'. Have you ever been for a walk? You wouldn't like it, but most popular walking destinations are popular for their 'visual fluff'.

    What is the point of sitting here comparing feature sets of a genre you hate with feature sets of genres you prefer? You can build a watertight case for why you, personally, prefer those genres, and it still won't make NMS's procedurally generated world any less ambitious.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 20/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    Would bullet pointing them help? I'm not sure how, but if you think it will help you process them better this time.

    1. Scale
    2. Diversity
    3. Aesthetics

    So you point out a game that is, for all of its plus points, undeniably smaller, uglier and less diverse. I'd like to say I'm surprised.

    The creatures are the obvious figure of fun, the easiest target I could present to you, and so I challenged you to point out a game that procedurally generates creatures better. You won't, because you can't. You know this. I know this. Why bother?

    Round and round and round. And so I think that's where we leave it.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 20/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    I enjoy the 'walking simulator', going around looking at creatures. You don't. But that wasn't the question. If No Man's Sky has no ambition, and doesn't push procedurally generated worlds (which I believe was the topic of conversation) further than anyone else, then name something that does it better.

    Or move the goalposts again onto some other aspect of the game other than the one we we talking about, which was procedurally generated worlds.

    Or don't bother. Actually, don't bother. You've already given your answer: the last game you can think of that did anything like this was Spore, and this game does it better. Yeah, I agree.
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @George-Roper

    The variety, the animal life, the sheer scale and, without wanting to come over too artsy fartsy, it's just so gosh darn pretty.

    If there's a game that does it better, I haven't seen it. You have?

    I mean, take the biggest point of fun: the animal life. We all know how terrible that is, right? Hilariously, embarrassingly awful. Roll the comedy accordion music.

    Who does it better?
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @DjFlex52

    A procedurally generated game that pushes procedural generation further than any other game ever has is ambitious.

    It may have (entirely predictably) fallen short of their early demos, but it still pushes procedural generation further than any other game ever has. That's still an achievement. If they hadn't been aiming higher, they wouldn't have got this high.

    So, good on them for aiming high, and good on them for raising the bar. It's something I predict we'll be seeing less and less of, so I would suggest people enjoy devs like Hello Games before they are all hunted to extinction.
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @DjFlex52

    Oh, right, yes. If you remove the ambitious thing it does, it isn't ambitious at all.

    Good point.
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @DjFlex52

    Firstly, stop talking total crap. There are not 'loads' of games that do procedurally generated worlds like this. You know that's a lie, I know that's a lie, why bother?

    As for excuses, the videos are there for anybody to watch. Obidan's IGN one there has FOUR AND HALF MILLION views. If they were trying to hide it, it really wasn't very well hidden.

    By the way, I'm not a video game 'consumer'. I'm a video game enthusiast. That means I take an interest in, and have an understanding of, how they are made. I have no desire to see video games turned into soulless 'consumer' products, devoid of ambition, expression or passion. I have no desire for developers to stop showing me their early work because a few noisy imbeciles don't understand what they are looking at.

    There are games made entirely as consumer products, all focus group testing and carefully managed PR. Maybe those are your games? Personally, I don't like any of them. I find them derivative and boring. I've had more pleasure in 10 hours of NMS than in the entire AAA studios' release schedules of the last 5 years. Maybe that's beyond your comprehension. I don't care. Do I waste my life trolling Call of Duty threads about the inevitably derivative nature of AAA sequels? I do not.

    It's time to draw a line. I'll stick to my side, you stick to yours. You don't like games that fall short of impossible heights, I don't like games that don't even shoot for heights in the first place. Those two things should really be able to cohabit, but it'll need your lot to stop being their usual toxic selves.
    Reply +5
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @DjFlex52

    We saw article after article...video after video for 3 years.
    And all the (many, many) recent videos, like the one obidan has just posted, show the exact game I'm enjoying.
    Reply +4
  • PlugMonkey 19/08/2016

    @Fyre2K

    No, it's just the reality of game development. Ambitious games don't start small and get bigger, they start big and then get scoped down to fit on the target platforms with all the other game elements loaded at the same time.

    It has been this way for 35 years, and it will be this way forever.

    Anyone with an interest in the medium should understand these kinds of fundamentals.
    Reply +2
  • Humble Bundle offers cheap Nuclear Throne, The Beginner's Guide and more

  • PlugMonkey 17/08/2016

    @BabyBabyBabyOh

    Same here. I didn't think it worked, and it was deathly, deathly dull.

    Pretension I can deal with, but there's no excuse for being boring.
    Reply +1
  • Watch: 5 crappy retro games based on classic British TV shows

  • PlugMonkey 16/08/2016

    If you take Ed Welch's themes for Knightmare and Blockbusters and swap them over, Blockbusters gets waay more sci-fi:


    (barring the horse...)

    And Knightmare gets even more heroic!



    Oooh, that Bob Holness has let himself go.
    Reply +5
  • Watch: We play No Man's Sky on PC locked to 4K 60fps

  • PlugMonkey 15/08/2016

    @IronSoldier

    You still at it?

    Turns out if you go around calling people 'precious', and claiming anyone who likes a particular game is part of some 'hivemind' engaged in death threats, DDoS attacks, tears and tantrums, people start getting argumentative.

    Quelle surprise!

    I reckon if you stopped stirring the pot, the stuff in the pot might stop annoying you by spinning so fast, but where would the fun be in that, eh?
    Reply +7
  • People are finding strange things in No Man's Sky PC code

  • PlugMonkey 15/08/2016

    @PixelJumper

    It might have me back at it too. I do love NMS, but my personal expectation not lived up to is I was hoping to get my full HOTAS nerd back on, and it's just not that game.

    Definitely room in my life for both.
    Reply +3
  • No Man's Sky's most aggravating omission (on PS4)

  • PlugMonkey 13/08/2016

    It's not the UI icons, it's the hints. Shut up! I've built a bloody jetpack booster already! Reply 0
  • No Man's Sky review

  • PlugMonkey 13/08/2016

    @SuperShinobi

    The nuance is in the words.

    Words do nuance much better than a score out of five.
    Reply +4
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @-TheDarkSide-

    I guess it'd be the same for a racing fan who only saw a decent race game, once in a blue moon.
    Exactly that. I can say without even playing it that NMS is undoubtedly flawed, but it's easy to overlook the gristle when you're starving.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @makeamazing

    I have my moments. :cool:

    To be honest, I've had a lot of time to prepare. This whole shebang is just a more high profile version of the Elite Dangerous debate...
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @-TheDarkSide-

    Do you need to play a game like this to see that it doesn't appeal to you?
    No, I don't think so. In terms of the 8 kinds of fun, the vast majority of games nowadays revolve around Challenge and Narrative. They've proven to be by far the most popular. That means a lot of gamers go into all games expecting that's what they're going to get.

    This game would appear to revolve around Submission and Discovery and Fantasy and Sensation instead.

    If people go in expecting Challenge and Narrative, they're going to be disappointed. If they don't think those other types of fun are actually fun, then they won't like a game like this. You don't really need to play it to know if that's you or not.

    The thing is though that people who do like those types of fun are rather underserved by games in general these days, and so they're going to go fucking nuts over it. And the people who think all games should adhere to the twin pillars of Challenge and Narrative, because without those it 'has no gameplay' and isn't really a game, are going to hate it. And then they're going to fight. :/

    It's a shame, really.
    Reply +12
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @IronSoldier

    It would seem that you're welcome to form and express an opinion in relation to NMS once it chimes 100% with the fanboy hive mind. ;-)
    Or if it chimes 100% with the dissenting hivemind. Depending which side you're on.

    Shots being fired on both sides.
    Reply +7
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    The only thing I find more baffling than people raging because a game they like got a bad review is the people raging because a game they don't like got a favourable one.

    Some people are not you.

    They like other things to what you like.
    Reply +5
  • Here's exactly when No Man's Sky unlocks on PC

  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @-TheDarkSide-

    Yep. I found Forza to be deadly dull, and TLOU was alright but massively over-rated.

    However, I just say that you enjoyed them. I don't say you enjoyed them (or so you say) because that would be a bit patronising.

    You know what you like, and you like different things from me, because that's normal. I don't need to qualify things as if you don't know what you like.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @sloth09

    There's a bit of that goes on, certainly, but there are also just people with different tastes to your own.

    When people say they like a game, because they do, and then someone else's claims to know better it does make them come across as a little bit of an arrogant, condescending titbag.

    It might even be that this is what sets some people on the defensive. I know I don't like being told I don't know my own mind, and I suspect you probably don't either.

    I'm not really sure how you distinguish between the two. All of the games you've listed received a very broad critical response. Wouldn't you expect a broad audience response too? How do you tell corporate fanboyism from a naturally split response? Especially if you're looking for it.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @Peeto

    Buggered if I know. I haven't tried it yet, and when I went to log in it said my account needs migrating, and then didn't recognise the log in details 2nd time around. I'm at the mercy of customer support now...

    I got a lot of fun out of Elite Dangerous. If you think NMS is better then that's very promising.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @The_shlaaaag_returns

    That's a friendly conversion rate! With the pound in the toilet, $72 is £55. Save nine quid with the click of a dropdown box.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @Peeto

    I think one is the single player and one is the multiplayer. If you want both it's the $72 combo pack.

    I had no idea it had got so expensive! I backed the kickstarter, and I genuinely have no idea what that gets me nowadays.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @mega-gazz

    That's fair enough.

    I think most people struggle to define what they think is lacking in these instances. Personally, I think that an inevitable function of making something this vast is that it's going to feel pretty empty.

    If you do attempt the sort of emergent missions that can work so well in something Skyrim or Red Dead sized, they get stretched tissue thin in what is a functionally infinite game world that has no main questline narrative to break them up.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 12/08/2016

    @mega-gazz

    What emergent gameplay were people hoping for?

    I'm still awaiting the PC unlock, but a lot of the criticism seems to echo the criticism of Elite: Dangerous, i.e. they wanted Skyrim In Space, and it isn't.
    Reply +1
  • No Man's Sky finishers have advice about Atlas Stones

  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    @simpleexplodingmaybe

    Quite. Unless the advice is "they are irrelevent and you can safely ignore them", which would seem an unlikely topic for a whole article...
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    @ChrisTapsellEG

    I understand you are trying to help and stop people 'wasting their time', but in a game of exploration everything that I don't get to find out for myself is a massive loss: up to and including getting to the centre of the galaxy and realising I've made a mistake selling my 'atlas stones'.

    It's the journey, not the destination. I would rather have had that naive experience, now lost to me, and fucked it up for myself than the one I'm now going to start on Friday of waiting to discover a purpose I wish I didn't know existed.

    My naive experience wouldn't have been a waste of my time, even if it had meant me not seeing the credits roll. That would have been the experience I wanted.

    That atlas stones exist isn't a spoiler, if I find out about them at the beginning of the game anyway. That I need them at the END of the game is a MASSIVE spoiler though, because I wouldn't have found that out until the end.
    Reply +8
  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    Great. Only 32 hours to go until I can play, and I now know something I haven't found yet is vitally important. Thanks for that. I'd hate to have had to explore the game itself to find out these things.

    I guess that's me off Eurogamer until tomorrow evening at least.
    Reply +33
  • How to avoid No Man's Sky's allegedly game-breaking glitch

  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    @Minmat

    Good to know. Thanks!
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    @CaptainKid

    That seems like a bad idea. Already people are discovering planets which have been named by other players. Which is kind of annoying in an exploration game.
    Especially when it isn't released on your format for another 34 hours...
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 11/08/2016

    @SvennoJ

    Maybe test the game first before releasing.
    I'm interested, how does one test a universe?

    Edit: No, seriously mute negmonkeys. That's my main interest in the game. It's impossible to test in the traditional sense. There's an entire universe - so you can barely even scratch it - and then every time you find and fix a bug in it, you generate an entirely NEW universe. It's mental. The whole thing is a completely mental idea, and it can't possibly work. That's the charm.

    This game is for enthusiasts. It's not going to have the...reliability...that consumers demand from their consumer products. It's impossible for it to have, which is what makes it so interesting.
    Reply +2
  • No Man's Sky has an enormous day one patch that adds multiple endings

  • PlugMonkey 09/08/2016

    @jabberwoky

    It might, but the money has to run out at some point, and 6 months is a big ass delay to try and cover - especially if you can (just about) hit your original date. Maybe they have more information than both of us, and have reasons other than spite.

    Things are particularly pointy at this time of year though. If you miss a manufacturing slot in July/August, you aren't getting another one any time soon because all the big AAAs are coming in time for xmas.

    That's why you'll see games coming in February/March often slip a month or two, but games coming in September never do. They can't.
    Reply -3