PlugMonkey Comments

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  • XCOM 2 review

  • PlugMonkey 27/09/2016

    @lexlaureijssen1

    I thought I would, but never had an issue playing it.

    Overall, I though XCOM 2 improved on the original in all areas.
    Reply 0
  • Report: Oculus Rift creator Palmer Luckey secretly funded pro-Trump meme website

  • PlugMonkey 24/09/2016

    @MattEvansC3

    With everything going on does anyone really list the renationalising of the train service as a priority?
    Yes. Me.
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @H_D_Swagger

    The 'social justice warriors' are, as ever, going to keep right on doing whatever it is that the people who imagine them imagine them doing. They can't do much else. So what are you asking us for? You're the one with the handle on it.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @hejizulkunz

    They funded the Taliban (aka the mujahideen) to fight the soviets in Afghanistan.

    This isn't exactly a secret. It's the plot of Rambo III.
    Reply +8
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @OnTheUpGaming

    I'm completely with you on the witch hunts. We see way too many of them, and they all go way too far. It's almost become a hobby.

    That said, this isn't just about him voting for Trump. It's about him funding his campaign and engaging in a pretty grubby form of campaigning himself. Who someone votes for is none of my business, who someone funds with the money I pay them...that's a bit different.

    That said, and going back to what you were saying about priorities, this guy doesn't even own Oculus any more. Facebook does. Good old, squeaky clean, transparent and not even remotely sinister Facebook. Who gives a shit what Palmer Luckey gets up to? Are we going to pick apart every Oculus employee?
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @ziggy_played_guitar

    The Guardian is the same, which considering they're supposed to be left leaning themselves is even weirder. He's the wrong kind of left.

    He's not going away, though. They strike him down, and he only becomes more powerful than they can possibly imagine. He's even got the right look. :)
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @OnTheUpGaming

    That makes more sense. You don't object to the information being available, only to people prioritising it over far more important issues. Is that fair?
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @MattEvansC3

    I'm starting to find the whole Corbyn thing a bit creepy. As an undoubted lefty, I support his politics, but I don't actually care about him. I'd support anyone with the same or similar ideas.

    But a cult of personality seems to have sprung up around him now that this has got a bit lost in. I suppose when things get attacked, everyone becomes entrenched. There aren't usually many positive that result from that though.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @IronSoldier

    And likewise, you are free to imagine whatever you choose about whatever piece of bullshit it was you object to me calling you on. Can't say I really care which it was.

    Rejoice, the system works.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @IronSoldier

    I consider it to be consistent, at the very least. If it breaks into the mainstream, prices will come down, but we're a long way from that happening. In the meantime, it all looks pretty normal to me.

    If you want to buy an Oculus in order to outrage the imaginary strawmen in your head, you go right at it. That's the upside of free speech having consequences, I guess. They lose arcam, but they gain you. Swings and roundabouts, innit?

    Edit: Wait, you're waiting around for cheaper, more mass market VR but also object to EG mentioning Sony's imminent cheaper and more mass market VR? Hoooo-kay...
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @Mhoey

    Nailed it. Help yourself to a confectionary of your choice.
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @IronSoldier

    Meanwhile, other sites are reporting that £189.99 may be the ludicrous price of the Oculus Touch controller...
    EG reported that yesterday...

    Why ludicrous? It's how much the Vive controllers cost. It's all of £20 more than my HOTAS set-up. It's a niche, specialist controller being sold to an extremely limited market. Those are expensive. They have been since forever.

    'Gamers' once again feign outrage at the entirely normal and mundane. Quelle fucking surprise.
    Reply +6
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @OnTheUpGaming

    But I'd question the "consumers have a right to know about his political allegiance" comment. Do they?
    Um, yeah. They do, don't they? Just like they have the right to know if their products are being made in factories with terrible working conditions.

    I give him money, he gives money to Trump. If I'd rather not give him money to give to Trump if I can help it, that's allowed, isn't it?

    What's the alternative? The rich and powerful should have the right to gag reports of their political affiliations or factory conditions? I'm not seeing how that's better. Two imperfect solutions, but I think I prefer the more open one.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 23/09/2016

    @SnoppleMonster

    There are people who think that 'free speech' means speech without consequences.

    grassyknoll would like to address that.

    And that's it. The rest of the argument is semantics.

    You seem to agree that free speech should still carry consequences, so I'm not really sure what you're arguing about.
    Reply +4
  • Oculus Rift controllers Oculus Touch to cost £190 in UK - report

  • PlugMonkey 22/09/2016

    @Zerobob

    I think the controller costs £190 because it is specialist peripheral being produced on a relatively small scale.

    It's all of £20 more expensive than this HOTAS set-up, and that's just a glorified joystick. Albeit a specialist, low scale production one.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 22/09/2016

    @peytonlind

    You won't get far around here spouting sense and reason like that. ;)
    Reply +5
  • PlugMonkey 22/09/2016

    @mgnoodle

    No, the pound has tanked fairly hard. Buying things that are imported will therefore be more expensive.
    Reply +4
  • BioShock's fascinating but inescapable failure

  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    @BabyBabyBabyOh

    To me, it felt like it was toying with that line, because it tries to get me to do it, not just Captain Nolan North. Even if viewed as a character rather than my avatar, I still can't fathom his motivation in suddenly committing war crimes.

    I agree Far Cry did the same thing better. Far Cry 3 was good too. I quite liked not really being sure whether I was doing magic or just tripping balls.

    Spec Ops would have worked much better for me without them trying to go so big. If I'd just slowly gone crazy, I never would have questioned, and then it would have got me.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    @Unreal849

    It's not such a simple screw up when you clock it as that and then spend an hour trying to not have to go through with it. That rather undermined the whole spiral.

    For me, Bioshock went down like this:

    Me: “Why would I do all these terrible things?!”
    Bioshock: “Because you were brainwashed! Bwahahaha!”
    Me: “Oh. OK. I guess that does kind of explain it. If I’m honest, I can’t deny that when you said “would you kindly” I did respond by immediately injecting myself with gene altering solutions of unknown origin that made bees fly out of my hands, even though that was clearly a TERRIBLE idea…”
    Bioshock: “You did, didn’t you!”
    Me: “I even wondered why anyone would ever do that…and then I did it anyway…”
    Bioshock: “See? Brainwashing. Yeah!”

    Whereas Spec Ops was more like this:

    Me: “Why would I do all these terrible things?!”
    Spec Ops: “Because you never stopped to question your actions! Bwahahahaha!”
    Me: “Um. Yes I did.”
    Spec Ops: “You did?”
    Me: “Yeah. For about an hour. There was nothing else I could do though, so eventually I reluctantly did the clearly TERRIBLE thing just to progress and see if there was any point to all of this.”
    Spec Ops: “Does this count?”
    Me: “Not really, no.”
    Spec Ops: “Oh.”
    Me: “I really appreciate the effort though.”
    Spec Ops: “;_;”


    In the end, I did terrible things in both games because they were games and the terrible things were the only way to progress. That's what I do in all games.

    I think Bioshock's attempt to lampshade that worked better. Brainwashing works whether you questioned your actions at the time or not, and that wasn’t even the main theme of Bioshock. It was just a little flourish at the end.

    For Spec Ops, it was the whole gig, and it didn't quite fly for me. That said, I liked it better than TLoU or GTA V, for example, which don't even attempt to explain why every character feels compelled to murder absolutely every other character...
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    @Unreal849

    I preferred Bioshock by a good distance.

    Spec Ops spoilers:

    "Would you kindly" didn't fall on it's face for me nearly as badly as the white phosphorus section in Spec Ops.

    It was just a nice attempt to explain why my character has no agency. It didn't really affect my enjoyment of the main narrative, I didn't guess it was coming, and the whole thing still worked even if you did.

    In Spec Ops I rumbled the whole deal, and it had no way to cope with it. None of the things the game then told me explaining my actions actually made sense any more.
    Reply +4
  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    A BioShock game that invites you merely to pay witness, to savour the artistry of each period interior, eavesdrop upon the wretchedness of its denizens, toy with its AI ecosystems unproductively, could be a BioShock game that finally achieves some kind of peace.
    "Would you kindly" twist aside, Bioshock IS that Bioshock game. The story for me was never about Jack, it was about the rise and fall of Rapture. Jack's role was as archeologist, not protagonist. Video games are particularly good at this kind of 'narrative excavation', and Bioshock did it particularly well.

    If I was writing the movie of Bioshock, it wouldn't feature Jack at all. It would be set during the rise and fall of Rapture. That's the real story.

    "Would you kindly" was a fun gag at the end, skewering the way game characters always have to do as they are told. I never thought it undid all the great stuff the game achieved in telling me the story of Rapture, and I've never branded it a failure because of it either.
    Reply +29
  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    @Unreal849

    Like the author pointed out, the "would you kindly" twist really is neutered by the fact that the game is completely on rails.
    I had the same problem with Spec Ops: The Line, and the reply of "well, you could have stopped playing" doesn't really cut it.
    Reply +5
  • Sony's Shuhei Yoshida on No Man's Sky

  • PlugMonkey 16/09/2016

    @Pasco_

    I hope I have a few 'disasters' like NMS...
    Reply +9
  • Valve finally takes on Steam user review score manipulation

  • PlugMonkey 15/09/2016

    @Aj64

    No, but your assertion that the majority of game reviewers use their reviews as a soapbox for their personal politics - and that this is a bad thing - is your personal politics.
    Reply -3
  • PlugMonkey 14/09/2016

    @Aj64

    What Steam reviews give me is a wider opinion base. I can very quickly get a dozen opinions and find out why the people who like it like it and why the people who don't like it don't like it. Being able to see the # of hours played is also very useful data. I know I can immediately discount the opinion of anyone giving a Not Recommended after 800 hours of play, for example.

    I don't agree with you about the personal beliefs and politics - I think that's just you soapboxing your own personal beliefs and politics. :)
    Reply -2
  • PlugMonkey 13/09/2016

    @arcam

    I guess I'm in a minority but I find the Steam user reviews to be extremely useful!
    Me too. I rely on them more than anything else.
    Reply +3
  • Time crisis: Is this the end of the light gun?

  • PlugMonkey 10/09/2016

    @Nintendo64

    More accurate than the CRT method too.
    Is it? I haven't played one that doesn't have to put a reticle on screen to show where you're aiming.

    Point Blank, on the other hand, gave you two seconds to shoot an apple that was about six pixels across. No way you're doing that with a Wii pointer.
    Reply +5
  • Ark fans burned by Scorched Earth, the Early Access game's "completely finished" expansion

  • PlugMonkey 08/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    Do you think that when a developer develops the game, he has developed all the things that come in the DLC?
    No, I never said that. I said less code support than at the beginning. Not none, less. They're not starting from scratch are they? If you're starting from scratch with your DLC you're doing it wrong. Stop doing that.

    Some developers had been working in the expansion instead of making a release of the game.
    Yes, they have. There are lots of legitimate reasons to work this way. Not starting your DLC until the main game is out the door is a very, very silly thing to do. If that's what you do, stop doing that too.

    Your assumption that this is proof of improper behaviour is false.

    Your assumption that the throwing of the arbitrary flag from 'early access' to 'release' would accelerate with every extra body - regardless of their skillset - thrown onto the task is false.

    Finally, my personal favourite, your assumption that the best way to tell if a house has a roof is to look at what the builders do next instead of going inside and looking up, is the most bizarrely, irrationally, idiotically stupid falsehood of all.

    Three days ago the people review bombing this on Steam were merrily running around in the game for 1800 hours apparently perfectly happy with the state of the roof. Then when the DLC was released, the roof miraculously disappeared and they all went on a rampage. I say again: what the actual FUCK is that? Does what's there, in the game, count for nothing? 1800 hours, you must be under some sort of roof!

    The game has been released - in early access. The expansion has also only been made available - in early access. Both are still in development. That development has overlapped, because that's the normal, sensible and generally best way of starting your DLC.

    As a developer, you should know that, so how the hell do you have a problem with this?

    You should know all of this. How do you not know this? You, of all people, really should know better.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 08/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    Ah, right! It's a language barrier! That hopefully makes this much simpler. Maybe even a bit less antagonistic. Who knows?

    You're a coder by the way, aren't you? I can tell by the way you think they're the be all and end all of everything. ;)

    I would say that anyone on a game development team developing a game is a game developer. I think most game developers would agree with me here. It is, after all, impossible to develop a game like ARK without artists, so how can artists not be developers?

    Code for the tool to make the new scenarios
    If you've already made a game, why do you need all new tools to make a new scenario for the same game? You don't. You already have tools. Your artists and designers can set about making new content with far less code support than they would have required at the beginning of a new project, before the tools were all made. They could be doing that while a bunch of your coders (and a handful of designers and artists) carry right on fixing the bugs in the main release.

    In fact, it's pretty much essential that your content creators do shift off've the thing you're trying to finish, else you'll never finish it. As a developer, you surely know this. You have to stop changing things because change = bugs. A hundred people all making changes at the end stage of a project really isn't a very clever idea. Just having your tools engineer suddenly wading into the code base to fix other peoples' bugs would be pretty bloody stupid on its own!

    When that wind down starts, I guess you could sack everyone. Or you could move them onto the next thing instead. Assuming that's allowed, and doesn't make you a thief. Wait, I'm losing track. You only become a thief if you show people the next thing too soon. Right? I think that's it. Because then you've built a house with no roof? :rolleyes:

    Point out where this deviates from your understanding of development, and I'll point out where you're doing it wrong. I'm helpful like that. ;)

    You know, it's almost like I do know what I'm talking about after all.

    Almost.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 08/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    You really do get your artists to fix memory leaks? :eek: Ooo-kay. Good luck with that. Each to their own, I guess, but you can't automatically expect Wildcard to follow your own deeply bizarre business practices. ;)

    Is this as simple as some sort of language barrier here? What exactly do you mean when you say "a developer is a developer"?

    You can't possibly mean that artists, designers, producers and coders can all fill the same roles interchangeably, but when I've pointed that out to you, you seem to have just reiterated that you think they can. I'm confused. They really can't.

    I'm now going to say the single most unpleasant thing I've ever said to another human being: if you're a senior developer, I only hope that one day you commit some sort of arbitrary, meaningless transgression and have every single thing that you have passionately worked so hard to build ripped apart by a braying mob.

    It's a horrible thing to say, but it's true. If you're a developer and you think what is happening here is a good and righteous thing, then I really, really, really hope this shit visits your door one day too.

    Sorry.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 07/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    To be even shorter.

    A developer is a developer.
    Um, no. That's very, very incorrect.
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 07/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    Cause as you can imagine, the guys that develop a game are not divided in roofers or electricians.
    No, they are divided into other equally non-transferable skill sets. Try getting a texture artist to fix a memory leak, for example. See how they get on. Maybe get ALL the texture artists on it. That will go better! A million monkeys, and all that!

    Seriously though, analogies aside, let's step through what the developers have done wrong here. They've made a game and released it on early access, so that people who wanted to could have it now rather than wait. That's fine. People love that, in fact. Then they've made some DLC. They've made the DLC towards the end of the main game's development because that's how you make DLC, if you have any sense. Then what have they done? Why, they've made it available straight away, in early access, so that people who wanted to could have it now rather than wait, EXACTLY LIKE THEY DID WITH THE MAIN GAME IN THE FIRST PLACE, and that? THAT is a crime so horrible they get review bombed into oblivion. What? What. The. FUCK?

    They didn't wait long enough? That's the problem? They didn't realise that main games you can release early and people love that, but there are strict rules on when you are allowed to release DLC, so you need to sit on it until you've thrown a completely arbitrary flag from "early access" to "release" or you're a thief? A thief according to people who have got 1800 hours out of your original £20 release?

    What. The. Actual. FUCK? Does that sound like the actions of sound minded individuals to you?

    What galls me more than anything is that the games themselves don't even factor into the equation! Make a shit, small, expensive game whilst obeying the arbitrary checks and measures of a bullshit imaginary ruleset and you're golden. Make a good, huge, cheap game and get some meaningless semantics wrong and be destroyed. The bullshit imaginary rules are now more important to these so-called gamers than the games!

    How the fuck did we get to here? It's a really, really quite unpleasant place.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 06/09/2016

    @josepm.pons

    Your wonderfully stretched analogy conveniently ignores that rooms of expansions are made by carpenters, electricians, plasterers, decorators and interior designers, while a roof is repaired by roofers.

    All available roofers can be hard at work fixing the roof, and that's not a good reason for all the carpenters, electricians, plasterers, decorators and interior designers to be sitting on their hands.
    Reply -2
  • PlugMonkey 06/09/2016

    What an outrage! How dare they realease an expansion without first severing all support for the base game?! Don't they know the imaginary Laws of Game development in my head?! Continuing to support things is anti-consumer! Or something!

    How dare they release an expansion for an early access game early?! We don't want things early! We want one thing early and then nothing else early! Surely this is obvious?! We will not stand for this! It's the thin end of the wedge! Feel my rage! RRRAAAAARGH!

    :rolleyes:

    Honestly, I swear gamers get dumber and more self-entitled with every passing year. You know, I'm starting to think that every single game repeatedly telling everyone they're the special chosen one that the universe entirely revolves around might not have been a brilliant idea...

    Edit: Yay! I got a + from one rational person who understands logic and reason! (I'm taking a more glass-half-full approach to the rating system these days...)
    Reply -9
  • PlugMonkey 06/09/2016

    @UncleLou

    My only regret is that I have but one +1 to give.
    Reply -1
  • Sounds like we won't get a Mass Effect trilogy remaster

  • PlugMonkey 02/09/2016

    @cloudskipa

    However it's monumentally selfish to expect those of us with the capability of B/C to forgo a free release and instead be forced into (let alone be happy with) rebuying the games AGAIN just because Sony didn't offer YOU a way of playing the game outside of the PS3 originals.
    What free release?
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 01/09/2016

    @peterfll

    Pff. What do you want to play that old rot for? Just because nobody has done it better since, or even looks remotely like trying. Onwards! Forwards!

    If you want to play Burnout, just dredge up a working PS2 from somewhere and have at it. You don't need a remaster. What do you mean your TV doesn't have a SCART connector any more?
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 01/09/2016

    @Wayne

    Lol. In fact, it's exactly what you're saying. ;P

    Foward ever, backward never.
    Why? And at what time threshold do things count as 'backward'? A set number of years? Or just when we run out of functioning Xbox 360s?
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 01/09/2016

    @Wayne

    It's not not what they're saying, but it is an illustrative exaggeration, yes.

    Why shouldn't we preserve and remaster classic games like we do with classic films and albums? Because there's a new one coming out? Because you can lamely accuse publishers of going for a quick buck, like when EMI re-issued The White Album on CD?

    Remasters and backward compatibility are a good thing, imho.
    Reply +9
  • PlugMonkey 01/09/2016

    @amanset

    Yes, let's bury every game that's more than two years old in a big hole in the ground, along with any movie or piece of music or anything else old and un-hip.

    New stuff only please. Nothing from the past has any value.
    Reply -11
  • "We have to do better when we launch NX"

  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @geox30

    Yep! Wii - arm waving + portability + series link + couch game greatest hits = win.

    And obviously I'm not just pimping this idea as Nintendo's only hope of survival because it's what would make a perfect complimentary system for me. Oh no, nope, definitely not! :D
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    Even bigger chills than them dying on their arses attempting a seismic shift into the most crowded part of the market?

    Actually, yeah, I can respect that. Go down swinging Nintendo!

    That said, if the NX serves up portable couch gaming in the pub, I am so in. Then the 3rd party support they need to court is Rocket League and BroForce rather than AssCreed, but if they did it, I'd buy two!
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    No. The opposite. ;)

    A powerful console would mean a totally different hardware strategy, putting a large investment into powerful tech that they would probably end up having to sell at a loss to be competitively priced.

    A powerful console that wouldn't really increase the value or attractiveness of their own more colourful brand of family friendly games. You need power for realism, not cartoons.

    And getting 3rd party AAA games back(?) on their console in addition to their own ip would result in a system with a muddled marketing message. Many single console buyers who might be attracted by the 3rd party AAA games would not be as attracted to Nintendo's exclusive ip than their competitor's exclusive ip. Meanwhile, buyers attracted to Nintendo's colourful brand of family friendly fun would be put off by the high price of a powerful console.

    They would die on their arses.

    "Cheap, simple, fun" is what they should aim for. It's always been a core part of their make up. Sure it's more Gameboy than N64, but it's also the part of the market that two bigger, richer rivals haven't set up home in and come to completely dominate since the N64 glory days.

    "Nintendo NX. At home. On the go. Cheap. Simple. Fun."

    Boom. Done. Call me, Reggie.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    It's not about gaming pigeon holes, it's about branding. It's about people knowing where to go for what they want. It's about fashion. It's about cliques. More than anything, it's about focus. It’s hard enough to sell people on Nintendo and Xbox being ‘family friendly’ and ‘hardcore’ respectively. Neither can pull off being both.

    I disagree that most gamers enjoy a wide and diverse type of game. I think enthusiast gamers do, but enthusiast gamers will buy a Playstation/Xbox/PC and an NX. That's the ‘slightly different’ companion console market that the Wii leveraged and that I think the NX needs to catch a piece of alongside the more casual crowd.

    Do all your son’s friends enjoy such broad tastes? There is a huge swathe of the market for whom gaming is JUST Xbox or JUST Playstation, and Nintendo are all out of position to try and get them to switch to being JUST Nintendo. Getting AssCreed on their system wouldn’t be enough. Then they’d be left pitching Mario up to AssCreed fans against Uncharted and Halo in the face of a family friendly marketing message. :/

    They’d need an entirely different hardware strategy, an entirely different exclusive roster, an entirely different marketing message – one that doesn’t just echo what Sony and MS are already singing – and all that just to be late to the fight two much bigger bastards are already having over the same patch of land.

    They would die on their arses. AssCreed wouldn’t help them. Too much of everything else is out of alignment to get the people who care about it to buy into the rest of it.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @Gigifusc

    Nintendo are never going to appeal to the Assassin's Creed crowd. Everything about their current position and strengths is wrong. Splatoon sits perfectly alongside Mario and Zelda and Pokemon, Assassin's Creed never will.

    They can either find a slightly different market, like they did with the Wii and the DS, or they can go for the core market, become a weak Playstation / Xbox tribute act, and die on their arses.

    I don't think there is a third option.
    Reply 0
  • Dead Rising 4 is a good zombie game, but maybe not a good Dead Rising

  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    Aaaand another thing: one of the best bits in Dead Rising was when I was forced to improvise with whatever weapons I could lay my hands on, rather than just using my favourite double-booked mini-chainsaws for every single encounter. Without the timers, I would never have done that. The timers forced me to play in a more varied and interesting way than the slower, more risk-averse strategies I would no doubt have employed otherwise.

    Game designers very rarely put things into a game to deliberately ruin your fun. I generally find that if you go along with the direction they're trying to take you in instead of trying to fight it, a better overall experience lies in store. Clever folks, game designers. It often turns out they know their stuff.

    Dead Rising is the perfect example of this. First I didn't like it, then I went along with it, then I loved it. Now I want more games to do it.
    Reply +8
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    @sarcasticjones

    Nah. Give them all guns and swords and tell them where to stand. Sorted.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 26/08/2016

    but despite a vast sea of zombies on screen, Dead Rising 4 never once conveys danger.
    So, in what way is it a good zombie game? By using zombies as the most unimaginative form of slaughter patsy?

    I agree with you on the timer though. I left Dead Rising on the Xbox 360 an agonising one survivor short of the perfect playthrough. I'll be buying it the moment it comes out on Steam to address that.

    Without the timer, you'd get the perfect playthrough first time, every time. I guess that's what a lot of people want these days, but I thoroughly enjoyed playing it just trying to save people, playing it again to follow the story, and then playing it again to try and do both. It felt like it was designed to support that, with all the unlocks and upgrades carrying over between goes, and it made an actual game of it.

    Having to choose between a story lead and someone's life was a great dilemma. I liked it much more than the standard approach where the world stops for me. In Oblivion I once left someone waiting in a sewer for me for about 3 months. When I came back, resplendent in glimmering glass armour, and he was still there pretending nothing had happened, it was just daft. A game not doing the standard, normal, boring thing was a fresh change. Make me not the god of the universe. Make me choose.
    Reply +4
  • Watch: Why I'm not sticking with No Man's Sky

  • PlugMonkey 25/08/2016

    @TheMasterJeef

    I have a very low tolerance for grindy games, but I don't find NMS a grind at all. I have no eye on my next whatever when I'm playing, it just find it really relaxing. Like visiting a national park.

    That's why I don't mind not being able to crash my ship, because that doesn't sound very relaxing. And I also don't mind that hardly any of the animals try to murder me up, because that doesn't sound very relaxing either.

    I think the problem is that if you do like grindy games, this isn't a very good one. This game has bad loot. It has good other things, but if you like loot, it has very bad loot.
    Reply +20
  • PlugMonkey 25/08/2016

    @rep-

    Exactly. The site's review is becoming more and more questionable.
    Some people like it. Some people don't like it. I like it. Oli likes it. Johnny doesn't like it.

    There's no shortage of 'consumer' information to allow people to decide if they would like it, like me and Oli, or not like it, like Johnny and Jim Sterling.

    No universal consensus needs to be reached. None of these opinions are 'questionable'. Me and Oli can like it, and you and Johnny and Jim Sterling can not like it, and these things can all happen at the same time.
    Reply +59