PlugMonkey Comments

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  • No Man's Sky delayed, no longer releasing in June - reports

  • PlugMonkey 27/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    It was revealed far too early.
    Sez you, with the convenient advantage of 20/20 hindsight on:

    a) How big it would get, and how quickly. Some indie devs push their games at trade shows for years before anyone even raises an eyebrow.

    b) How long it would take to finish.
    (Including having your office flooded out.)

    Negative opinions are welcome to be voiced. It helps if they are founded on something though.

    So, you really would have turned down The Late Show?
    Reply +6
  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    You would have turned down The Late Show?
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    Oh, so they ARE at fault. Make up your mind.

    Should Sean Murray have turned down The Late Show?

    Would you have turned down The Late Show?

    I wouldn't. Nobody in their right mind would. It's The Late Show!

    The hype train was at full steam the moment they demo'd it. We did that. Us gamers. We generate the hype with clicks and views and "omg this is gonna be the best game evar!" comments. From that point you couldn't derail it with a fucking bomb. That buzz, it comes from us, and when it doesn't it costs MILLIONS to fake.

    Hello Games have done nothing wrong. Not one single thing, apart from try to make an ambitious game that captures people's imaginations. The fuckwits. We'll be sure to stamp that out of them. After all, we only put them up there on that pedestal so we could kick them off it.

    Edit: Late / Tonight show fuppuppery.
    Reply +17
  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    Over hype is a concert? Because no game could ever live up to the expectations set...by a concert? That's a pretty small scale, arthouse way of over-hyping something. Or was this concert at the Superbowl?

    If Hello Games aren't at fault, why are Hello Games drawing so much criticism for their handling of it?
    Reply +5
  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    Right. The hype overload began as a result of a concert. Nobody was getting at all overexcited before then.

    If only they hadn't done that dang concert, nobody would have heard of the game and everything would be alright.

    (I also find the idea that a tiny studio with a minimal marketing budget should be actively trying to reduce the exposure of one of their games lest it be considered unseemly absolutely hilarious. Yeah, better to risk going bust than flirt with being too successful.)
    Reply +12
  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @mega-gazz

    How have they 'overhyped' it? Has there been a seven digit multi media marketing campaign?

    Nope. They just demo'd it and the interwebs went mental. Gamers got hyped about the idea all on their own.

    You want them to do something quieter than demoing it at a trade show? What is that, exactly?
    Reply +25
  • Get Grow Home, Rayman Origins and Call of Juarez: Gunslinger for $1

  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @kimchibaka

    am I being overly cautious?
    Yes. It's fine.
    Reply 0
  • More powerful Xbox One planned for 2017 - report

  • PlugMonkey 26/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    I don't know why you're purposely missing the point, people don't feel they're buying a new phone on a contract as those costs are hidden.
    They're not particularly well hidden. I spotted them almost immediately.

    It's obviously quite different to spending £350 every few years on a toy.
    Yes. It's spending £800 every few years on a new toy.

    Except for a handful of exceptionally moronic people, I think most people DO know they're buying a new phone every couple of years. They do it anyway because they like shiney new things.

    I think this is evidence that they are more likely to buy a new console for £350 every four years or so. You think the opposite. Que sera.

    Edit: OMG, I've just realised that the difference maker here is you having even less faith in humanity than I do...

    I might be starting to agree. ;)
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    No, either way it might be shitty, based on things that haven't happened yet. :P
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    Consumers don't pay £500 up front though do they. That's the point.
    No, they pay £800 over the course of the contract instead. Is that better? Because if you like that better, you don't have to look far to find any number of companies who will offer you the same deal on buying a console, or pretty much anything.
    Reply +4
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    I did notice that! Very generous. Righto. Shelf life, from early adoption to final death rattle. Eight years on average, 6 years minimum acceptable value. Your numbers.

    Now I look at it, I don't know why I started talking about time between console releases. Maybe it's because we're commenting under an article about a new console release, not a current console discontinuation?

    Did you notice that the Xbone's shelf life isn't over? They're about to announce a redesign of it in fact.

    I noticed that.

    So, using your metric of value, nothing has actually happened yet. They support the new redesign for a couple of years - and it would seem pretty bloody stupid to make it if they weren't going to - and everything is entirely fine and normal. A 6-10 year shelf life is maintained!

    Phew!

    See you in 2019.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    No they don't, the majority get their phones on contract
    Um...I hate to be the one to break this to you, but on a contract you're paying for the phone in full plus a veritable boatload of interest on top...

    Edit: Oh come on! Who's negging that? It's just maths! Look at the contract with the phone, look at the sim-only contract without the phone, multiply the difference by the length of the contract. What do you get? A very, very expensive phone!
    Reply +6
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    Well then, I guess we're going to have to wait unti the Xbone is actually discontinued and reconvene then.

    If it's 2019 then you'll be all smiles again. Won't that be nice.
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Simatron3000

    Is there not overlap here? Is XBone being discontinued?

    How else would you like to measure it? If you're an early adopter, the gap between X360 and Xbone is 8 years.

    If you're a when-it-hits-mainstream, 2nd or 3rd SKU sort of customer, the whole thing slides up a couple of years and the gap is...eight years.

    The expected shelf life of consoles is NOT 6-10 years. The longest ever shelf life of the most enduring generation of consoles EVER was maybe 6-10 years. Just about. At a push.
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    There is an expected shelf life of 6-10 years for consoles
    Hang on there, when has there EVER been a 10 year gap between console generations?

    The longest gap I can find is 8 years between X360 and Xbone, and that was preceded by a 3 year gap between Xbox and X360. You can't take the upper end outlier and stick it as the middle of your range.

    (Well, you can, but a pedantic twat will come and call you up on it. *waves*)

    Across all four major console manufacturers (and ignoring the Sega add ons) the average generation is 5.23 years. The last generation was unusually long.
    Reply +28
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    Now you mention it, I don't know a single person who even remotely cares about 4k. This is all about VR.

    VR is clearly possible on PS4. I've played it and it's very impressive.
    It'll work, but it won't fly. Not once the more demanding stuff starts coming through.

    If it would, Sony and MS wouldn't be doing this.

    There not much point investing a ton of money in VR and then hobbling it with the mid-range of the specifications it demands. That's what you're going to pitch to the VR early adopters? Good luck with that...
    Reply +8
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @GreyBeard

    What the fuck are Microsoft thinking?
    VR. Same as Sony.

    The last generation dragged on and on and on because no big tech leap came along to force a new one, until eventually we got a new generation basically out of pure fatigue.

    And then, about 10 minutes after the specs were all locked down and production was starting to roll, along came the big tech leap everyone was waiting for and now everything is ever so slightly not quite powerful enough to leverage it. It's quite spectacularly awkward.

    So, Sony and MS can either wait five more years and then do VR on the next generation of consoles, or they can do this.
    Reply +40
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Fourfoldroot

    Much though the rampant pant wetting is hilarious fun to watch, I don't think you actually have anything to worry about. If you want VR or a 4k display, you need one of these. If you don't, you don't. In that instance, buying one would just be a fantastic waste of money.

    Honestly, I've never really bought in to the whole idea of PC gamers being an elite master breed of vastely superior intellect and maturity, but there must be some reason we don't throw a massive benny every time nVidia release a new GPU to the market. Maybe there's something in it after all.

    (Yeah, you can all neg this too. ;))
    Reply +7
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @TeaFiend

    We are going backwards to the old days of upgrades for consoles, just like how the Mega Drive had the 32X and Mega CD.
    We would be, if the new releases weren't cross compatible with each other.

    But they are, so we aren't.
    Reply +19
  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    @Bludsh0t

    If I wanted to have to upgrade my console every 3 years, I'd buy a fucking PC
    You don't upgrade a fucking PC every three years, and so you also don't have to upgrade your fucking console every three years. (He says stating the fantastically bleeding obvious.)
    Reply +19
  • Former Valve employee is suing the company for $3.1m

  • PlugMonkey 25/05/2016

    Plaintiff felt bad for the exploited minors
    So bad that she'll only feel better if someone pays her, not them, a million dollars?

    Gee. I feel bad too. I'll take a cheque.

    What's the difference between 'general damages' and 'special damages'? Funny that they both come to a nice, round million.

    This is probably wrong of me, but my sympathy for the plaintiff is somewhat diluted by the eye-watering level of compensation being claimed. This is obviously complete speculation on my part, but it does make it look a teeny, tiny bit like a cynical cash grab as opposed to a genuine attempt to recoup legitimate losses.

    What does the employment of minors have to do with it at all?
    Reply -1
  • After 10 years of waiting, Half-Life 2: Episode 3 seems further away than ever

  • PlugMonkey 24/05/2016

    @Baddamobs

    BTW, I didn't call you lazy. The answer to the rhetorical question was "No. Pursuing your own ambitions over someone else's decade old obligation does not make you lazy."
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 24/05/2016

    @Baddamobs

    You're conflating "lazy" and "distracted" for no particularly good reason.

    There you are, over there working on a not particularly interesting or groundbreaking FPS for the 'fans'. Not your fans, you understand - they have absolutely no idea who you are - but fans of something the studio that you work at made 10 years ago that has nothing to do with you, personally, at all. You were in highschool when the last one came out.

    Here I am, over here working on a much more exciting, completely groundbreaking VR prototype. Hello! *waves*

    The only thing you have to do to stop working on the boring FPS and come work on the exciting VR project is say "I would rather work on the exciting VR project".

    Switching to the more challenging, groundbreaking project is a strange definition of 'lazy'.

    So, what would you do? Keep tirelessly trudging along for someone else's fans? As I say, I'd be impressed if you did, but I wouldn't.

    People talk about game studios as if they're some sort of constant, unchanging entity, but they aren't. The people who are Valve now will, for the vast majority, be a completely different bunch from who was Valve 10 years ago.

    That's why I think you might get some massive Half-Life nerds like the Crowbar Collective to do it, but Valve themselves aren't massive Half-Life nerds any more and they haven't been for a long, long time.

    I understand why you think Valve in general should honour their commitment, and I'm sure if Valve had shareholders they'd make sure it happened for the money, but I really don't see why you think you or I would volunteer to spend 3 years of our lives honouring someone else's commitment if no-one forced us to.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 24/05/2016

    @Baddamobs

    And then Gabe says "Cool! If you don't feel like working on your personal dream project instead, then you have at it!"

    Depending on how big a team you can recruit to your banner, a non-groundbreaking FPS game is only going to mean, say, three years of your life and career dedicated to cleaning up someone else's mess, and then at the end of it, everyone will most likely hate you for not living up to their expectations.

    Honestly, if that's what you would do in that situation, that's something I genuinely like and respect.

    I wouldn't do it though. Even if I started, I'd likely get distracted by something more interesting than ticking the box that is HL3. It takes a long old time to make a game, even a not particularly ambitious one. "For the fans" is an admirable sentiment, but one I feel is much easier to express when you don't actually have to serve the sentence.

    And that's why I think there hasn't been a HL3, and might never be a HL3. Maybe they'll put the Crowbar Collective on it once they've finished Black Mesa?
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 24/05/2016

    @Baddamobs

    You think they're not making HL3 because they're too lazy? Seriously?

    Look at it this way: if I set you up in a development studio with an infinite budget and told you to make whatever you felt like, would you make Half-Life 3? Or would you make that game idea that's been knocking about in the back of your head for years that you've been desperately hoping for a chance to make?

    The second one, surely. The only reason you'd do the first one is if you didn't have any ideas of your own, in which case I'd have to wonder how you landed the job at Valve in the first place. Does that make you lazy?
    Reply -3
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @tarasis

    but the odd way it's been handled and spoken about suggests there is more to it than that.
    Why does it? If it was a simple case of lack of interest, it would be handled exactly the same way - with the people who aren't interested in making it also not interested in talking about the thing they have no interest in.

    Are you familiar with Occam's Razor?

    My assumptions:

    1) no-one at Valve is interested in making any more Half-Life.

    Your assumptions:

    1) The idea was stolen.
    2) The owner has sued.
    3) The owner has demanded all future development cease, rather than make a mountain of money from it.
    4) The owner has gagged Valve with an injunction, rather than be recognised as the original creator of one of the most celebrated game series in history.

    When it comes to idle speculation, I'm unconvinced that all your extra assumptions increase the probability all that much. Who is this mystery figure? And why do they hate money and acclaim so much?

    Edit: Actually, the equally likely alternative is that a small team of die-hards are still working on it at Valve, and the reason nobody talks about it is nobody has the faintest idea if/when it'll ever be ready.
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @DAN.E.B

    What's wrong with that? It would be exactly the same as it is now, only free, and with hats.

    What can you possibly dislike about 'free'? Because I know you can't dislike hats...
    Reply -2
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @Baddamobs

    why fucking bother keeping the IPs?
    Why fucking bother selling fucking the IPs when it's a lot more fucking effort than just fucking keeping them?
    Reply -1
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @hazzatori

    I don't think it's quite so free that Steam would be allowed to fall into total disrepair just because no-one felt like maintaining it, no.

    However, I still think that a general lack of internal interest in HL3 is more likely than a legal gagging order. No-one's making it because no-one wants to, and no-one's talking about it because there's nothing to talk about.

    If it's free enough that they don't have to put everyone on the most profitable IP regardless of interest, that is.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @tarasis & hazzatori

    What makes you think there is anything to talk about? Letís take the simpler (and therefore more likely) reason and say that there just isnít anyone currently at Valve who feels passionately keen about making Half-Life 3.

    Who would talk about that and what would they say? Who in that situation would take it upon themselves to arbitrate that ďHalf Life is overĒ and why would they bother? I canít see any reason, so that therefore seems like a far more likely reason than concocting a legal gagging order for no reason.
    Reply 0
  • PlugMonkey 23/05/2016

    @Rogueywon

    More Half-Life is not on Valve's commercial interest.
    Good point, well made.

    I suspect the other reason is that it's in no-one's creative interests either.

    Assuming that Valve is half as free and open a place to work as it claims to be, I can't imagine there are all that many people queuing up to work on someone else's 10 year old IP.

    Other studios milk their cash cows to fund their experimental stuff. Valve are in a privileged position of not needing to, so they don't.

    Everyone wants to play HL3, but who wants to work on it for 5 years when you can do literally whatever you want?
    Reply +3
  • EA dev chief initially rejected World War 1 setting for Battlefield

  • PlugMonkey 18/05/2016

    @Zerobob

    If Battlefield 1942 was a true representation of WWII, that wouldn't be "fun" to play either. It's an over the top, sexed up version of WWII. That's all right though because, as a nation, we are well used to over the top, sexed up versions of WWII. We thrive on them.

    In Britain, we paint WWI as being all misery and suffering and WWII as being rich with heroism and adventure. That's not the truth though, it's just our national perception and where we focus our narratives.

    The truth is that both sat somewhere in between. WWI had the Somme and Ypres, but also Lawrence of Arabia and Biggles. It's all just a case of where you look and how you spin it.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 18/05/2016

    @goggyturk

    Exactly. It's this guy's job to turn down pitches. On a day to day basis, he'll do that waaaay more often than he greenlights something.

    It's the dev team's job to communicate their vision for the game in a way that convinces him. This isn't something wrong happening, it's just a functioning process in action.

    If he greenlit every half-baked idea that weaved its way across his desk, EA wouldn't last all that long.
    Reply +10
  • PlugMonkey 18/05/2016

    @riceNpea

    so doesn't he actually deserve some credit for changing his mind?
    I'd say so.
    Reply +11
  • Dark Souls board game raises $71k Kickstarter goal in three minutes

  • PlugMonkey 17/05/2016

    @LFace

    Going by other small scale, high end board game productions - like the 3rd edition release of Space Hulk - £80 will probably be the cheapest you will ever see it, ever.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 17/05/2016

    @Max_Powers

    Yes, new Ferraris for everyone. When you make a product that is outrageously successful, everyone gets new Ferraris. There's nothing wrong with that.
    Reply -1
  • Dark Souls 3 PC patch removed due to freezing issues

  • PlugMonkey 16/05/2016

    Well, thank the gods for that. It's been bobbins all weekend. Reply +1
  • Centipede and Missile Command are getting movie adaptations

  • PlugMonkey 13/05/2016

    FFS! You don't need to license Centipede! Just make a movie about a giant centipede. You could even call it 'Centipede'.

    Look:
    IMDB

    See?
    Reply +13
  • Dark Souls 3 tops US retail sales for April

  • PlugMonkey 13/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    Charting behind the double phenomenon which is GTA and Minecraft isn't really negative in itself.
    GTA V was a phenomenon TWO YEARS AGO.

    Charting behind GTA V on it's launch (or even it's 'next gen' relaunch...) TWO YEARS AGO would not be a negative, but it's now a back catalogue title trundling along selling copies to the last few people who haven't got it yet.

    If your brand new game isn't sparking more interest than a game that came out TWO YEARS AGO, you're in trouble.
    Reply +9
  • PlugMonkey 13/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    Assumptions and conjecture based on sound reasoning and historical knowledge, in this particular instance.

    We know roughly what numbers back catalogue titles do in May, and we know roughly what numbers big releases do in November. This isn't blue sky speculation. It would be a very odd November chart where you broke the top 20 with a couple hundred thousand sales. You won't still see GTA V in there then.

    That's not to say it's a bad game. Sometimes good games just don't find an audience. Split/Second and Blur were both good games, but they came out this time of year, did these sorts of numbers, were massive bombs and sounded the death knell for both those studios.

    Seventh place at this time of year just isn't a success. There's no way to spin it that way. It might be sad, but it's true.
    Reply +9
  • PlugMonkey 13/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    Exactly. Seventh place in November when the six games ahead of you are all million selling new releases wouldn't be too bad.

    In the doldrums of early summer, seventh place behind old back catalogue titles is a whole different kettle of ball games.

    That, my friends, is a bomb.

    Reply +6
  • PlugMonkey 13/05/2016

    @dogmanstaruk

    What's the positive spin? It's behind two games that were released over two years ago. That is not what the kids would call "selling like gangbusters".

    (Kids say that, right?)
    Reply +12
  • Lionhead: The inside story

  • PlugMonkey 12/05/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77

    It's definitely a juggling act. Ambition + money + deadlines and things just go 'boof', as McCormack put it. If you're not prepared for it, it just runs away from you and before you know it all your great senior developers are chasing around being lousy managers instead.

    I suppose the advantage that a lot of ambitious small studios have today is many of them have already worked at massive studios and so have a much better idea of what goes along with that. This generation were making it all up as they went.
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 12/05/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77

    I think, for the most part, the problem is that it just doesn't scale. A great culture for a 30 strong team easily turns into a toxic culture for a 300 strong studio.
    Reply +5
  • Can Battlefield 1 help us see The Great War with fresh eyes?

  • PlugMonkey 12/05/2016

    I find the idea that WWI is somehow 'off limits' bizarre, along with all the hand wringing justifications that go along with it.

    We have countless gung-ho action games set in modern conflict zones. Never mind that millions have died and continue to die right this second, that's all fine because they're not us.

    We also have countless gung-ho action games set in WWII. Never mind that the Soviet Union alone lost as many soldiers as were killed on all sides in WWI, we scored much better so that's all jolly hockey sticks too. Boys Own adventures all the way!

    WWI was about as 'fun' and 'exciting' as any other war. It didn't feature death on an unprecedented scale, it only featured the death of British people on an unprecedented scale, hence Britain focussing on that aspect of it in every WWI narrative. That's no universal truth though, it's our personal, British narrative.

    Is that what makes it off limits? The unprecedented loss of British lives? Because that's not an especially convincing argument, truth be told.
    Reply +1
  • Disney Infinity cancelled, Avalanche Software shut down

  • PlugMonkey 11/05/2016

    @BOFH_UK

    from a business point of view it does make sense.
    Especially when the story just below this one is about Star Wars Battlefront selling 14m copies. No risk, no hassle, pure profit from Disney's point of view.
    Reply +1
  • Dark Souls 3 the biggest launch in series

  • PlugMonkey 11/05/2016

    @UncleLou

    ...it's rarely the people you expect. In your case here, it's noone who has even posted in this thread.
    Ha. That's exactly what I expect.
    Reply +2
  • PlugMonkey 11/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    OK, I see. 'Shipped' is how many copies the publisher has sold, and every time Steam sell one they technically also buy one from the publisher.

    It makes sense once you follow the money. Always follow the money. :)

    Can I ask why I'm being negged for understanding why a publisher uses a term? I've not made them!
    Forget it, Jake. It's Chinatown. :rolleyes:
    Reply +1
  • PlugMonkey 11/05/2016

    @grassyknoll

    That is wrong. Shipped means all copies sold to retailers. PSN, Steam & Xbox Live count as retailers in this context (& does for all publishers).
    They might count as retailers, but how many copies have been sold to Steam? Surely none. (Well, technically one, I suppose).

    Do they count them as shipped when Steam 'ships' them to the customer? Surely that's sold through though? :/
    Reply +3
  • PlugMonkey 11/05/2016

    Praise the sun!

    (I'll get my coat)
    Reply +27