Mr.Spo Comments

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  • Mother 3 will finally get Western release - report

  • Mr.Spo 04/02/2016

    @redcrayon With the Nintendo Account & My Nintendo service launching next month, and with Nintendo's briefing mentioning upgrades for both those new services by the end of the year, I should think Nintendo's unified network platform will be up and running properly by the end of this year. At that point 3DS and Wii U will be being phased out, at least one type of NX hardware will be on the market (my bet is portable by Christmas), and Nintendo will have both their account system and one or more mobile titles up and running on iOS/Android.

    Nintendo's briefing even implied one of the future updates to My Nintendo will allow you to apply discounts (earned through the new points system) not only on digital purchases, but in-store, probably by having your Nintendo account linked to your phone. Unified accounts are long overdue, but the early signs from Nintendo are promising. We'll just have to wait for the inevitable oversight/catch...
    Reply -1
  • Mr.Spo 04/02/2016

    Perhaps I can help clear up some of the speculation about Nintendo's software based emulation here.

    In effect, Nintendo's Virtual Console strategy was incredibly short-sighted. As know from the few public statements about NX and Nintendo's previous development of hardware, home consoles and handheld consoles were developed in isolation from one another by separate engineering teams. In addition, likely due to Nintendo's background as a toy manufacturer, each Nintendo system has used different operating systems and software tools, and this extends to software based emulation. Wii, 3DS and Wii U all use different emulation programmes, which means if Nintendo want to get the same title up and running on Wii U and 3DS, they need to make two versions of the same basic product, rather than simply running the title through the same software emulation programme on both systems. NX will be the first pieces of Nintendo hardware to run the same basic operating system, utilise the same software tools, and by extension, the same type of software emulation.

    Why does this result in GBA and DS titles being available on Wii U, and not 3DS? It's not a question of capability, or even short term commercial gain. 3DS obviously can run GBA titles (remember when the ambassador games first launched, NES titles also lacked features until they were updated on their eShop release), and has the bigger install base than Wii U. Wii, a system not much more powerful than 3DS, had software based emulation that not only ran NES, SNES, and N64, but hardware from other manufacturers, not only Sega home consoles and portables, but arcade machines, PC Engine and Commodore 64. Nintendo's Virtual Console team, when VC is a priority, are obviously quite capable of getting a variety of different systems emulated and up and running. The key point here, as Nintendo revealed in one of their initial NX briefings, is that rather than starting from scratch and designing NX home/handheld in isolation, the development of their hardware will be integrated, as will the development of their operating system, software tools, and yes, software emulation. Furthermore, the base for NX's OS etc is Wii U's current OS and software emulation. My theory is that Wii U Virtual Console has become the priority for Nintendo not only because Wii U is in more need of software, but because the current emulation programmes used by Wii U will be the basis for the future of Virtual Console on any device. Wii U's Virtual Console has essentially become a testing ground for the future of the service.

    On NX, that will hopefully mean that through the new Nintendo Network, which crucially is now the platform (no longer is the individual hardware system the platform), we have a genuine cross-device service across the single network platform. A genuine Virtual Console, a service you can access and play from home or on your handheld, hopefully with save states uploaded to the cloud.

    Lengthy post aside, Mother 3 is wonderful. I'll happily purchase and play it legally, this time.
    Reply +22
  • Splatoon sells 4m copies, bought by a third of all Wii U owners

  • Mr.Spo 02/02/2016

    @Malek86 I honestly think 3DS has given Nintendo more food for thought than Wii U's relative failure, given handhelds have been their primary source of income since they launched the GameBoy. Even in 2013, when they launched a hardware revision, Fire Emblem, Monster Hunter, Luigi's Mansion, Zelda, and two huge hits in Animal Crossing and Pokemon, 3DS missed expectations. Reply +1
  • Bravely Second steps out of Final Fantasy's shadow

  • Mr.Spo 29/01/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77 Well, see, I'm incredibly skeptical because what I've turned up shows no links between 3DS, N64 and GameCube, all three of which had chipsets provided by different hardware manufacturers. And you're now refusing to provide evidence, and suggesting 3DS hasn't had much developer support, which isn't true.

    N64's chipset was produced in collaboration with Silicon Graphics and NEC, while GameCube was ATI and IBM, who in turn produced Wii and Wii U's chipsets. There are obvious similarities from GC through Wii U, most obviously in GC to Wii and it's clear that Wii U is in the same (Power) architectural family as those systems, but there are no links between those systems and the N64. Nintendo's handhelds have always been designed separately, and not in tandem, with home consoles. Indeed, it's only Nintendo's recent (within 2 years) re-organisation that changes this. What you're saying simply doesn't hold up.

    There are obvious similarities between 3DS and DS, because the systems share chipsets designed by ARM, with the 3DS featuring a more advanced chipset of that found within the DS. The DS itself feature two distinct ARM chipsets, one a new set for generating 3D graphics on a portable system, and another a souped up version of the GBA chipset for backwards compatibility. ARM's portable chipsets are completely different from the architecture put together for Nintendo's home consoles.

    So unless you've got mixed up, or read bad information, I don't see where you're coming from with this N64/GC/3DS link. As I've said to someone else here, I'd never dispute that 3DS is showing it's age. In the same comment, I pointed out the 3DS clearly wasn't cutting edge technology when it came out. As the New 3DS model shows, the system is now just about capable of running downgraded Wii ports (albeit one of the Wii's more ambitious titles, given DK Returns and Monster Hunter 3 made it to 3DS). As for the developer support, 3DS has attracted plenty of development support from Japan, the traditional bed of support for handhelds. Did the technology hold it back five years ago? I doubt it. I expect Western publishers (who largely ignore traditional handhelds anyway) made bigger bets on the burgeoning mobile market, and who could blame them? 3DS's third party support has still been strong, though.

    If you can provide evidence of architectural links between N64/GC/3DS, I'd love to read it, because it'd be interesting to see how those three very different systems are linked on that basis. But nothing I've turned up suggests you're right on this.
    Reply -1
  • Mr.Spo 29/01/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77 Do you have a source for any of those claims? Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @Eisenstein A very valid point, though with the New 3DS the UI etc is improved.

    As I replied to SpaceMonkey, I'm not suggesting the 3DS is future proof, or even that it's aged completely gracefully: my point was simply that after 5 years on the market, it's not unusual for a system to show its age, especially given 3DS was hardly cutting edge tech when it launched in 2011. I'm certain we'll see a replacement device of some kind this year.
    Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @redcrayon I did manage to complete BD, the options to alter the frequency of random battles (or remove them all together), as well as to control the speed of battle and even set automatic attack patterns, made the game incredibly accessible. I just think it's a huge shame what is otherwise a magnificent game (and one of the best JRPGs of the generation) was marred somewhat by a chunk of recycled content. I'm still hugely excited for Bravely Second. Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77 Also, what on Earth do you mean by 3DS once having been N64 tech?? Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77 My point wasn't that the system hasn't aged, but rather that it's not surprising the system seems long in the tooth given it's now been out for five years. Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @SpaceMonkey77 3DS showing its age "already"? It's been on the market for five years... Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    Also, as much as I appreciate the preview, are we going to see a review (or coverage) of any of the other imminent releases on 3DS? Final Fantasy Explorers is out tomorrow, after all. Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 28/01/2016

    @Kain1 This, this, this. A thousand times this. I loved Bravely Default but the final grindathon really let it down and was appallingly overlooked by reviewers. Reply +6
  • Bizarre Pokémon game Detective Pikachu is real, out next week in Japan

  • Mr.Spo 26/01/2016

    Huh. Didn't see that coming.

    Given this is 3DS related, are EG posting a Final Fantasy Explorers review sometime soon? It's receiving mixed reviews so far and I'm unsure about keeping my (£22) pre-order...
    Reply 0
  • New Paper Mario game coming to Wii U - report

  • Mr.Spo 23/01/2016

    @seeyoshirun It certainly would be interesting if this and Pikmin 4 are confirmed for Wii U. That'd suggest whatever device is intended to replace Wii U isn't coming this year, or perhaps isn't coming at all, with the first bit of NX hardware intended to replace 3DS. Beyond Fire Emblem: Fates and Federation Force, there are no first party titles in production for 3DS, whilst Wii U may see Twilight Princess HD, Pokken Tournament, Star Fox Zero, Pikmin 4, Paper Mario, Project Guard/Robot/Treasure (remember those?) and Zelda U launch this year. Not a bad Indian summer.

    As others have said, I'm hopeful this is more like Paper Mario 64 and Thousand Year Door than the last two Paper Mario titles. Intelligent Systems have been quite productive, too, in comparison to other Nintendo subsidiaries. This would be their second solely developed Wii U title, along with them co-developing FExSMT, in addition to four 3DS titles, plus DLC and eShop games, since late 2012.
    Reply +3
  • Mario Kart 64 doesn't have Ghost data on Wii U

  • Mr.Spo 22/01/2016

    Given, bar the release of Mother 1/2, Virtual Console hasn't been a priority for Nintendo, I'm not surprised. Wii U's install base is probably too low for Nintendo to do anything other than launch titles they're pretty confident they'll make a decent profit on. It's also probable that they're testing out DS/Wii/GBA emulation for the NX, which, at one point at least, was going to use Wii U's emulation as a starting point for Virtual Console. Wii, 3DS and Wii U all use different types of emulation, bizarrely.

    On the pricing point I don't think £9 is expensive for a quality N64 title on Wii U, but I do agree Virtual Console needs a more flexible pricing model. Hell, all round the service needs improving, but we won't see that happen until Nintendo have new hardware on the market.
    Reply -1
  • Zelda: Twilight Princess HD's Amiibo-exclusive dungeon revealed

  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    @ShiftyGeezer The idea that amiibo unlocks would be provided for free isn't true at all, though.

    In what previous Zelda game is there an option to instantly refill your health, arrows, or have enemies deal double damage? In what previous Mario Kart were Mii outfits from other franchises present? In which Smash game could you train and level up an AI counterpart? Hell, outside of the Zelda remasters, there aren't even options to play on a more difficult setting in Zelda unless (in the original and Skyward Sword) you complete the game first. Hero Mode was included in the last HD Zelda remaster and is included here, without needing an amiibo unlock. In this case, Nintendo aren't moving content over to the amiibo, they're creating extras that didn't exist in the first place so that the amiibos have more value.

    I agree consumers need to complain, but mountains are being made of mole hills here. The amiibo implementation in TP:HD is nothing spectacular or game-changing. It's stuff like Mario Party 10 and Amiibo Festival that are the real causes for concern.
    Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    @ShiftyGeezer You don't need an amiibo to unlock hard/Hero mode, that option is available from the start of the game. The Ganondorf amiibo (once per day) can be used to double the damage enemies deal in either normal or Hero Mode. Hero Mode already has enemies dealing double damage. Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    @Cheeky-Girl-Gamer This has never been shown at E3. A little bit of footage was shown a couple of months ago, and it looks exactly as it did then. It's Twilight Princess in a higher resolution with better textures, and that's about it. Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    @Dappa amiibo are compatible across a number of games, though some games get exclusive amiibo. However, if some characters have amiibo from two amiibo ranges, like the Smash version of Luigi, that toy will have the same functionality as the Luigi toy from the Super Mario range of amiibo.

    The Zelda amiibo from Smash are compatible with Smash Bros, Hyrule Warriors and now Twilight Princess HD, with at least the Wolf Link amiibo having some compatibility with Zelda U.
    Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    And that's it - so not the huge new dungeon many expected.
    Quite a few people suggested (given the name of the dungeon) it would simply be another version of the Cave of Ordeals. That's not really anything significant and not something I'm bothered about either way. Really it should still be accessible to everyone, but the Wolf Link amiibo could just make it easier by allowing you to save your progress. If I remember the Cave of Ordeals correctly, you had to do the whole thing at once, right?

    Hopefully double damage isn't locked behind the Ganondorf amiibo and is just par for the course in Hero Mode, that helped to make Wind Waker a decent challenge, and it's something that'll improve TP.
    Reply +3
  • Xbox One backward compatibility: every major game tested

  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    @MiY4MOTO Reassuring seeing yours and others comments on Halo: Reach being improved, I'll have to give it a whirl sometime. Reply +3
  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    Reach in particular is one of the most important games in the line-up and in its current form, it's basically unplayable for much of the duration.
    That's a huge shame. I have MCC unopened and was planning on playing Reach, MCC and 5 on Xbox One. Also a shame they've yet to figure out how to emulate multiple disc games. Mass Effect 2 remains one of my favourite ever games and I've got a second hand copy of Lost Odyssey I've yet to play, it'd be nice to play them on Xbox One.
    Reply +1
  • Fire Emblem: Fates controversial scene changed for Western launch

  • Mr.Spo 21/01/2016

    Cue the inevitable cries of "CENSORSHIP"

    It'd be nice to have an actual release date and details for a special edition, though.
    Reply -9
  • Why the internet is in a flap about Nintendo's NX console

  • Mr.Spo 20/01/2016

    @BlackFlower Agreed on the business sense. I left similar thoughts on another NX article.

    Even though 3DS will end up as Nintendo's least successful handheld, they'll still likely have shifted 70 million or so units in 6 or so years. Add to that the highest selling titles on the system are Nintendo published, meaning Nintendo get high software royalties from their handheld, lower development costs, and a rapidly growing digital business, and it makes more sense for Nintendo to attempt to retain or grow that market.

    Sony have indicated there's no Vita successor coming, but are resurgent in the home console space, while Microsoft are gaining steam again. Why enter a crowded space three years too late? NX could be a powerful portable system with an optional cloud-based unit (something Nintendo have actually patented) to plug into your TV and increase processing power. Time will tell.
    Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 20/01/2016

    Separate "reports" today indicating whatever NX is it will be compatible with a range of devices, including smartphones, PCs and even the PS4, according to David Gibson (an analyst), and AMD's latest financial results indicated they have high sales expectations for a new semi-custom chip, which some people are assuming is to do with NX, which will launch later this year.

    Basically be prepared for 3-5 months of this.
    Reply +2
  • Zelda: Twilight Princess HD has a new dungeon

  • Mr.Spo 14/01/2016

    One of the things I would really enjoy with a remaster like this, would be a 'Making Of' feature. Anybody else fancy that? Particularly given Twilight Princess had a lengthy development, with Miyamoto upending things partway through. Areas from the early trailers--including a temple with moblins in, and a larger forest area with some kind of tree like giant--never made it into the finished game. What were they about? It'd be fun to find out. Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 14/01/2016

    @lordirongut Yeah, given it's called "the Twilight Cave" it being something similar to Cave of Ordeals is quite likely. Still, the precedent Nintendo are setting is that there's unique content being hidden behind amiibos, rather than amiibos bringing extra (optional) functionality to a game, as Nintendo originally claimed they would, and, indeed, as they do in Smash Bros. It's not the absolute travesty some people will claim, but this is far closer to dlc locked behind a toy than it is extra functionality unlocked by a toy. Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 14/01/2016

    @Malek86 Forgive my ignorance, but isn't this how Lego Dimensions and Skylanders work? Or rather, you need the different figures to access different parts of content?

    Not attempting to imply Nintendo are ok doing this, but if memory serves, this is the kind of amiibo implementation Nintendo said they would avoid. Hopefully there's another way of accessing the dungeon.
    Reply +11
  • Mr.Spo 14/01/2016

    I've already pre-ordered the collector's edition, but I'm really, really not keen on content being locked out if you don't have the right toy. The extra dungeon should be there for everyone, given this is a remaster.

    The other changes sound positive, and scans from Famitsu indicate the tear-gathering quests have been streamlined, and possibly the wallet system has been dropped. Hero Mode being available from the off is great, too.
    Reply +5
  • Satoru Iwata to be honoured with posthumous DICE Lifetime Achievement Award

  • Mr.Spo 14/01/2016

    @Der_tolle_Emil If you'd like to know more, the obituary by Rob Fahey was well-researched, there's an episode of Game Centre CX (Japanese show) with Iwata on that's well worth watching, and I've also heard that the Game Historian's Iwata biography is very good, though I've not watched that. The latter two should be easy to find on Youtube, the obituary is on gamesindustry.biz. Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 13/01/2016

    One of my favourite Iwata stories is about him touring the 'show floor' at Nintendo, shortly before Wii U was due to launch, and noticing something off about the controls in the Balloon Fight section of Nintendo Land. He rolled up his sleeves, got stuck into the code, and fixed the product. Says so much about him. The CEO who wanted a flawless product, the programmer who had the skills to fix the code, and the gamer who noticed something wasn't quite right.

    A shame the trolls were out in force, but if anything this reward is overdue.
    Reply +11
  • Boxboy! sequel gets a surprise release in Japan

  • Mr.Spo 06/01/2016

    The first is absolutely magnificent, I'll look forward to this. Reply +5
  • The 50 most exciting games of 2016

  • Mr.Spo 06/01/2016

    @Ivattthestanier The studio making it were shut down, though Microsoft suggested development may continue with another team. I know it's a remake, but "Phantom Dust" is a great name for vapour ware! Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 06/01/2016

    @JoelStinty Pikmin 4 would be a great 'Indian summer' title for Wii U, especially if they've done an even better job of integrating the gamepad. Of course, Miyamoto didn't mention the format, so he may have let slip an NX title. Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 06/01/2016

    @Blackmarsh63 And spit in the face of 11-12 million Wii U owners, likely their most dedicated fans? Cross-format makes the most sense. It gives Nintendo a strong launch title without alienating Wii U users. Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 06/01/2016

    I wouldn't be surprised if Fire Emblem: Fates is an April launch in Europe, or if it launches the same day as Star Fox Zero, Nintendo of Europe tend to like to do that. For the sidebar, I'd also point out DQ VII is coming to 3DS. It's bizarre that as it's entering its sixth year, there's a slew of games on the way to 3DS I'm really excited about. Fire Emblem, Bravely Second, Final Fantasy Explorers, Yo-Kai Watch, the Dragon Quest remakes, hopefully a localisation of Monster Hunter X, and Boxboy 2 was just announced in Japan. I'm really surprised Bravely Second isn't on this top 50. Yes, it's in the sidebar, but surely the sequel to one of the best JRPGs of the generation deserves a spot in the top 50 to look forward to in 2016? No mention for Yo-Kai Watch, a game that's taken Japan by storm and is perhaps now bigger than Pokemon? Or is Fire Emblem: Fates the token portable entry, much like Luigi's Mansion 2 was the token entry in 2013's games of the year list, despite the launch of Link Between Worlds, Bravely Default, Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate, Animal Crossing: New Leaf, Fire Emblem: Awakening and Pokemon X/Y in the same year? I bring this up time and time again, but portable games really do get the short end of the stick.

    Ranting aside, I'm really hoping Zelda and Star Fox turn out well on Wii U, and the smaller releases like the Fire Emblem spin-off and Pokken Tournament turn out better than last year's spin-offs. Interesting that 3DS goes so quiet after the first half of the year, so I'm guessing we'll see portable NX (perhaps in Wii U's league technically) by the end of this year. Really looking forward to Gears 4, Blood and Wine, Yooka Laylee, Quantum Break, the new Deus Ex, Halo Wars 2, and Sea of Thieves. Cautiously optimistic about Final Fantasy XV and Mass Effect: Andromeda. Also looks like I'll be needing a PS4 at some point, too, particularly for Persona 5, Horizon and Last Guardian. Plus it's great to see the original Pokemon games coming to Virtual Console. Fingers crossed that a localised Mother 3 follows on Wii U.

    I list all of these games, but I'm still playing Xenoblade X, hell, I'm still playing Monster Hunter 4! And I don't have Fallout 4 yet, plus Sunset Overdrive, Transformers: Devastation and Master Chief Collection lie unopened. And I'm yet to begin my Final Fantasy binge...
    Reply 0
  • Wii game A Boy and His Blob revived for modern systems

  • Mr.Spo 05/01/2016

    Wii had some high quality niche releases, though this was one I missed. Reply +10
  • Xbox One exclusive Scalebound delayed to 2017

  • Mr.Spo 04/01/2016

    @dogmanstaruk I thought this. Star Fox will be done soon, but that still leaves Nier, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles game for Activision, and potentially Project Guard for Nintendo (I'd heard they were given that prototype). Platinum aren't a particularly big studio. Reply 0
  • Eurogamer's Games of 2015 no. 3: Splatoon

  • Mr.Spo 30/12/2015

    Great game, good to see it's had over 6 months of free content support, too. Single player was short but sublime. Reply +3
  • Nintendo in 2015: A difficult year shows signs of promise for what's ahead

  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    @liveswired Not sure who negged you, but yes, DC's sales curve was absolutely not 10.6 million in eighteen months. If it had been selling at that rate at a decent price, it might have been selling well enough for Sega to hang in there a little while longer. Reply -1
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    Also, 3DS launched in 2011, not 2010. Reply -1
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    @Dysisa 2015 certainly has been quiet, but 3DS's 2016 line-up is already looking strong, and that's only with four months of releases. Yo-Kai Watch, Final Fantasy Explorers, Bravely Second, Fire Emblem: Fates, Legend of Legacy, Pokemon Mystery Dungeon, Mega Man Legacy, Hyrule Warriors: Legends, Stella Glow, and a new Etrian Odyssey Untold game by the end of April. Add to that Federation Force and Dragon Quest VII & VIII later in 2016, and potentially the localisation of stuff like Monster Hunter X, then 2016 could be a great Indian summer for the system. And the original Pokemon games on Virtual Console in February.

    Overwhelmingly Japanese, sure, but that's what happens with handhelds! I'd give Box Boy and Steamworld Heist a whirl on eShop, if you're looking for something on 3DS.
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    @grassyknoll It depends on what the devices is. If there are different form factors, then sure, 100 million NX units isn't far-fetched. After all, most five year cycles for Nintendo work out at around 100 million units per generation, with the exception of Wii/DS (255 million) and this generation (85 million at best). My 40-60 million was based on the idea that NX launches as a more direct competitor for PS4/X One, which I actually think is a real long-shot.

    Hardware units will obviously be important, but perhaps more important will be the number of Nintendo Network users through mobile and NX. Nintendo could end up with several hundred million users, and an NX base of tens of millions. The only thing that is guaranteed is that the next few years for Nintendo will be fascinating.
    Reply -2
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    @I_Am_CatButler According to X's director, Xenoblade X only had a mid-tier budget. For all the scale of the game, it's obviously true it didn't have a budget approaching that of Zelda, or Smash or Kart (which are the real big-budget Nintendo games). Very few cut scenes are animated properly, and even fewer are particularly ambitious. What money Monolith Soft did get obviously went into creating the huge world.

    I agree with what you're saying, though. If Nintendo think its feasible to shift 3DS or GBA numbers with a hybrid device, and if there's no new Sony handheld coming, why abandon handheld for home console? Home console development is more expensive & time consuming, demanding higher sales volumes per software title, it needs the support of Western publishers who have never been at home on Nintendo hardware, and Nintendo need to face off against a resurgent Sony and a company with the clout of Microsoft.
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    @the11thdoctor Beyond the name being stupid, the initial confusion was largely down to lazy reporting. Nintendo made it clear before E3 that they were going to display a new console, but the media streams were full of "Is this a new console?"

    Maybe that just points out how silly it was for Nintendo stick with the Wii/DS brands. Wii in particular they should have dropped, I'm not really sure what they could have called 3DS.
    Reply -4
  • Mr.Spo 29/12/2015

    Certainly the most difficult transition Nintendo have ever made, and one that will only get tougher in 2016, but assuming NX is a home console, NX doesn't need to do 100 million units to be a success story for Nintendo. 40-60 million units in a 5-6 year period will be good enough. People make a big fuss about 3DS dropping off from DS, but DS was the second most successful system of all time. Only the original GameBoy line (which includes Color) comes close to PS2/DS, and even then the GB line is ~30 million units or so below those monsters. If 3DS tops out at 70 million, that'll be a good result for Nintendo in a difficult market, especially given how poorly they handled 3DS initially. The obvious millstone around Nintendo's finances this generation has been Wii U, which, combined with rough currency markets, wiped out any money 3DS made for several years.

    I'd be surprised if we see a PS4 or Xbox One style Nintendo system next year; I'd be even more surprised if one launches in 2016. The devices Nintendo have been patenting point to less traditional devices, and not a return to an arms race they quit a decade ago. Free-form displays and some kind of cloud driven unit have both cropped up again in recent months, and the free-form displays are due to enter mass-production in 2016. Nintendo need to get back to clear marketing/branding and lower price points for their hardware, but beyond that I don't know what they'll really do or what will really work. Certainly they're bullish on mobile, with Kimishima saying mobile could generate "Wii-like" profits within three years. If that's the case, Nintendo won't really need to worry about competing with a conventional home console, though I'd worry what it means for their output. If they really can come up with a hybrid device (perhaps their handheld interfaces with the cloud unit, and has a HDMI connection for tv-play?) and streamline their development, then theoretically you get more Nintendo software, more often, and Nintendo can create games that are better suited to either portable or home play but which aren't restricted to one or another, then maybe they can combine their home console niche with their still sizeable handheld market and get a decent return.

    Interesting times ahead, certainly.
    Reply +11
  • Games of 2015 no 5: The Witcher 3

  • Mr.Spo 28/12/2015

    One of several games I sank 50+ hours into this year, among Splatoon, Xenoblade X, Dragon Age: Inquisition and Monster Hunter 4. Have to agree with Rob on the comparisons made with DA:I. That being said, most of my play-time took place after the 16GB patch hit Xbox One, which resulted in a noticeably worse technical experience, with the frame-rate taking a hit, pop-in becoming a serious issue, and all kinds of glitches becoming very common. That being said, Geralt getting off his horse only to swim in mid-air was usually very, very funny.

    I feel, as with other ambitious games, Witcher 3 falls short in a number of areas. After the initial burst of excitement, I found many of the contract quests weren't particularly enticing, with the monster fights lacking much excitement. I thought the main quest, as Spekkeh said, was really poorly paced. There was far too much content loaded into Vellen and Novigrad, while the rather wonderful Skellige seems to suffer in comparison.

    It's still one of my games of the year, though. The sense of character and the narrative fullness of the world, when utilised well, reached heights I hadn't experienced in other games. For every technical hiccup or boring quest, and for every hour I felt was wasted play-time, there would be a moment, or a quest or an hour of play-time that was a real joy to experience. I felt the game peaked early, with the parallel Bloody Baron and swamp quest-lines hitting narrative high-points and a level of atmosphere that the rest of the game struggled to find again, but I still loved it.
    Reply +2
  • Unsung games of 2015: Code Name: STEAM

  • Mr.Spo 21/12/2015

    @losaa Long waiting times were a problem in the initial release, and in the European demo, but were patched in time for the full release in Europe. It's possible to get this for around a fiver lately, for that I'd say it's well worth a shot. Reply 0
  • Bayonetta is final Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Wii U DLC character

  • Mr.Spo 15/12/2015

    \o/ Reply 0
  • Watch: Better late than never - the delayed games of 2015

  • Mr.Spo 15/12/2015

    @Sicho I'm assuming remakes don't count. And I'm assuming Link Between Worlds doesn't count or isn't big enough because it's a handheld Zelda.

    To be fair, 5 years between new home console Zelda games is too long, but I guess that doesn't sound as fun as "9 years since the last big Zelda game" :P
    Reply +2