Mr.Spo Comments

Page 1 of 25

  • Kirby and the Rainbow Curse review

  • Mr.Spo 05/05/2015

    I wish I had more money and time at the moment. Splatoon is more appealing than this or Code Name STEAM, so I'll be getting that first and then hopefully I'll have some catching up time over summer. Reply +1
  • The best 3DS games

  • Mr.Spo 04/05/2015

    @Alatair Glad somebody said, sad to see so many people negging this thought. A clear sign that many hobbyist gamers continue to consider handheld gaming inferior to console or PC gaming.

    Makes me think about EG's GOTY awards in 2013, when 3DS had Monster Hunter Tri Ultimate, Fire Emblem: Awakening, Luigi's Mansion 2, Animal Crossing, Pokemon X&Y, Link Between Worlds and Bravely Default released. Out of those, only Luigi's Mansion 2 made it onto the GOTY list. Fire Emblem, which received 10, didn't even get a look in. There's a clear double standard when it comes to handheld games.

    Alongside the first two PlayStations and the SNES, the GameBoy, GBA and DS have perhaps the greatest software catalogues of any gaming systems. 3DS doesn't quite have the same variety, but for my money it still has more top quality titles than any other system this generation.
    Reply +2
  • Code Name: STEAM review

  • Mr.Spo 01/05/2015

    I had completely forgot this was coming out. I'll have to finish Majora's Mask and get some more Monster Hunter 4 out of the way first, though! Reply 0
  • Shovel Knight tunnels to Xbox One next week

  • Mr.Spo 21/04/2015

    Highly recommend this to Xbox One owners. Would love to see Shovel Knight in Smash, too. Reply +4
  • Probing the latest Mass Effect 4 leak

  • Mr.Spo 20/04/2015

    I'm conflicted. I'm still wary of Bioware's output, particularly with Mass Effect 3 in mind, but I so want this to be amazing. I like the sound of the setting, because it lends itself so well to a mysterious, exploration centric space opera. I also quite like the idea that the Citadel races have sent colonists off to another galaxy, because it means Bioware aren't quite having to throw away everything they established in their original Mass Effect universe.

    Cautiously optimistic. Yet to play DA:Inquisition, so fingers crossed for this.
    Reply +4
  • Gunstar Heroes, Streets of Rage 2 and Sonic 2 heading to 3DS

  • Mr.Spo 15/04/2015

    Though Sega have generally stuck to the more arcade like experiences, could we have Shining Force 3D at some point? Pretty please? Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 15/04/2015

    Yessssss. Reply 0
  • Mario Kart 8 x Animal Crossing DLC track list and footage

  • Mr.Spo 15/04/2015

    Ribbon Road looks excellent.

    Take note, everyone--including the Smash Brothers team--this is how you do DLC.
    Reply +4
  • Yoshi's Woolly World Amiibo now available to pre-order

  • Mr.Spo 14/04/2015

    Pre-ordered without the amiibo on Gameseek for £25. Splatoon is the same price there, for those interested. Reply +4
  • Monster Hunter 4 Ultimate passes 1m shipped milestone in West

  • Mr.Spo 14/04/2015

    I'm barely a handful of hours into this but desperately want to play it more. Such a good game, really enjoying the insect glaive, too. Reply +3
  • Affordable Space Adventures review

  • Mr.Spo 10/04/2015

    Another one on the eShop wishlist. Reply +2
  • Boxboy! review

  • Mr.Spo 09/04/2015

    @porkface Great, thanks! Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 09/04/2015

    Excellent. How about an Affordable Space Adventures review sometime soon, too, please? Reply +11
  • The Wii U games confirmed for release in 2015

  • Mr.Spo 07/04/2015

    In fact, Zelda producer Eiji Aonuma did not even commit to a 2016 launch when he recently announced the game's delay, and with word of the new Nintendo NX console on the horizon it is easy to speculate that the game could be held back further for repurposing as a next-generation launch title.
    Way to spin this negatively. Aonuma said a 2015 launch was "no longer the priority" for the development team. Effectively a delay to 2016 has yet to be confirmed; Nintendo are not committed to a 2015 date, is all. In practise I think that does mean 2016 is the earliest we'll see this game, but I don't see them holding back to 2017. If anything it'll be cross-platform with Nintendo's next portable, if the new portable is in the same ballpark as Wii U power-wise.
    Reply 0
  • N64, DS games launch on Wii U Virtual Console

  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    @jamyskis1981 Hopefully they'll patch out that 4:3 lock. I didn't mind it when I was playing EarthBound, for example, because it looked great on my TV. However, the option in DK64 really should be there for widescreen mode, given the game natively supports it.

    I'm still going to buy it, though. I don't have an expansion pack for my N64 so would have to fork out far more than £8.99 to play on my N64 and run it through my upscaler.
    Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    Also the addition of DK64 Virtual Console now means Space Station Silicon Valley is next on the 'to buy' list for my N64, saved me a chunk of money, too, expansion paks are expensive. Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    DK64 yes please. Reply +6
  • Mario Maker due September, next Fire Emblem not until 2016

  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    @TeaFiend Kotaku have done a break down of the Japanese release. I'd be beyond surprised if Nintendo followed this model in the West. They've spent a decade or more building the franchise here to the point where Awakening was a decent success, I don't think they'll risk that in the West.

    To clarify, there are four versions in Japan: the 'light' side story, the 'dark side' story, and a special edition that includes both; these are the retail versions. The downloadable version includes both light/dark campaigns. There is a third campaign launching after release as DLC, which you can buy for any version. If you buy the light, or dark version, you can buy the alternative version at a discounted price as DLC. The two campaigns also play differently, featuring different characters and storylines. The 'light' campaign is a standard Fire Emblem story where you defend a kingdom from the evil kingdom, the 'dark' campaign sounds more unusual and challenging, in that you must resolve internal differences within the 'evil' kingdom.

    In the West I expect we'll just get the equivalent of the Japanese special edition which includes both storylines; that's certainly how it was pitched in both the American and European Directs, which showed both stories as being included in one game. That way they can still sell the third campaign as DLC over here. I agree the Japanese release is bonkers, but I think in the West we'll just get a single retail release with both campaigns in, plus the DLC campaign.
    Reply +1
  • Splatoon inks in a May release date

  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    @Raiko101 Agreed. My understanding from the Direct was that this is closer to Captain Toad's amiibo functionality, which simply added an extra marker to find in every level. But in Splatoon, you get costumes as a reward.

    It's worse than the Captain Toad implementation because the costumes are exclusive to amiibo. If other information comes to light, such as the missions being entirely unique levels (not my current understanding, I think they're just randomly generated objectives for existing content), or the costumes giving performance bonuses in multiplayer, then I'd be more frustrated by this.
    Reply +3
  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    @smallblueslime I wasn't defending Nintendo, merely clarifying what is DLC. A principle has still been violated, but locking out extra missions behind amiibo is far worse than cosmetic changes to characters actually coming with amiibo.

    The far more alarming sign than costumes being locked into amiibos (Mario Kart 8 already does this) is another Pokemon spin-off driven by microtransactions, by the looks of things.
    Reply +8
  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    @PixelEdged They don't add new missions, just mission objectives you can play out on in-game maps.

    They do add exclusive costumes, though, which is effectively DLC.
    Reply +1
  • Mario Kart 8's Animal Crossing DLC brought forward

  • Mr.Spo 02/04/2015

    The 200cc update genuinely looks bonkers, looking forward to that. Reply +12
  • Fatal Frame U coming to Wii U this year

  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    Finally. Reply +7
  • Super Smash Bros. 3DS and Wii U Mewtwo DLC release date, price

  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    I'm glad I'm getting Mewtwo free, it makes paying for Lucas a little easier... Reply +1
  • Xenoblade Chronicles 3D review

  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    @Bander The X map was said to be around five times the size of Chronicles world, though I've also seen suggestions that's three times the area of the Chronicles overworld.

    It's pretty damn big, either way, with a lot of verticality. Between the flying mechs and how easy it is in Xenoblade to travel nearly anywhere you can see on the map, I'm betting we're looking at a truly huge world.
    Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    @Bander From preview translations in Japan, it looks as if the gamepad is integrated into the game as a navigation device for the alien planet you find yourself on. So you constantly have your map there, can view quests and set markers just on your gamepad. Not sure on inventory management, but the game is due out at the end of the month in Japan so we should know more before long.

    Localisation for the Western release is underway, too, so hopefully we won't be waiting too long.
    Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    @redcrayon Something this review doesn't bring up is that the combat, exploration and grinding are well suited to portable play. Combat is dynamic, if you die you simply restart, fully healed, at the newest landmark, and you can save anywhere. So if you want to get 20 minutes of grinding in on the bus or train, it should be pretty easy to manage. Fetch-quests also (mostly) don't require you to return to the quest-giver, so that's another streamlining that's well suited to portable play. Reply +13
  • Mr.Spo 01/04/2015

    While I have the Wii version and so wouldn't buy myself, based on other reviews--which have been far more positive of this--would recommend it to New 3DS owners, particularly XL. I think Martin's a little too dismissive of what for my money is one of the best modern JRPGs, and this is far easier to get hold of than the Wii version, even if the Wii version is the superior title. Reply +10
  • Pokémon Rumble World spotted via ratings board listing

  • Mr.Spo 31/03/2015

    I fully expect tomorrow's April 1st Direct to consist of a list of amazing announcements:

    Star Fox co-developed by Platinum!
    EarthBound remake for Wii U!
    Star Tropics reboot this year!
    F Zero UX!
    Metroid Dread!

    Followed by a short clip of Iwata:

    "April Fools. Please understand."
    Reply +16
  • Nintendo issues takedown notice for Super Mario 64 HD project

  • Mr.Spo 31/03/2015

    @DreadedWalrus Well, Nintendo have yet to do anything about the Mother 3 fan translation or the very public fan-made Mother 4, which has been in development for several years and is due out this June. Reply 0
  • Is Bloodborne the best game ever, or just the second best?

  • Mr.Spo 24/03/2015

    Sad to see the same thing happening here that's been happening when stellar exclusives hit the Wii U, some people desperately trying to detract from this.

    I've never been the biggest fan of Dark Souls, largely because my save file crashed after 20 hours of play and I never returned to it. This sounds fascinating and fantastic, it's gone on the To Buy Eventually list. I think I need a second job so I can feed my gaming habit.
    Reply +1
  • Nintendo might be making the most exciting online shooter in years

  • Mr.Spo 23/03/2015

    @redcrayon Very true. The lack of voice isn't a deal breaker for me, but I can see other people reacting very negatively. Reply +4
  • Mr.Spo 23/03/2015

    @Krappers Good question, but it looks like there isn't any voice chat option. Presumably Nintendo are going to go with something kid friendly and very simple, like pre-set phrases or gestures for your avatar. Reply +6
  • Mr.Spo 23/03/2015

    Massively looking forward to this. Reply +1
  • With the announcement of the NX, Nintendo admits defeat with the Wii U

  • Mr.Spo 18/03/2015

    I know I'm commenting a lot on this, but I think you're wrong to suggest the DeNA deal will primarily impact the Japanese market. Iwata implies in his briefing that Nintendo's expertise in exporting Japanese entertainment products to global markets will allow DeNA to overcome the big hurdle that presents the biggest long-term danger to firms like DeNA and Gree: an inability to transition from a Japanese featurephone market to an international smartphone market. Nintendo's partnership with DeNA might be Japanese in origin, but it's global in its outlook and intention. DeNA run Mobage, the biggest gaming network in Japan (30 million users), which is accessible across smart/feature phones, tablets and PCs.

    Nintendo's stake in DeNA is primarily aimed at building a networked platform that can compete with Microsoft, Sony, Google and Apple in the long run, not at generating large profits on smartphones.
    Reply +3
  • Mr.Spo 18/03/2015

    @Mr-Writer DeNA are the Japanese firm Nintendo have partnered with to build an online network and loyalty scheme that will operate across 3DS, Wii U, smartphones, tablets, PCs and whatever NX turns out to be.

    If Nintendo's smartphone games and network-centric strategy succeeds, DeNA will probably become a subsidiary of Nintendo.
    Reply +3
  • Mr.Spo 18/03/2015

    @JorgeLuisBorges Iwata also pointed out that from now on, a 'future Nintendo platform' will mean a variety of devices (PC, portable, home console, smartphone) connecting to a central network.

    NX is likely more than one device, and as I said in another comment, I think we'll see a portable variant first.
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 18/03/2015

    Even pessimistically, we can expect to see it some time in 2017, clocking the Wii U's time on the frontline between four and five years. That would be comfortably the shortest lifespan of any of Nintendo's major home consoles.
    Counting between Japanese launch and their successors Japanese launch:

    NES: 1983-1990
    SNES: 1990-1996
    N64: 1996-2001
    GC: 2001-2006
    Wii: 2006-2012
    Wii U: 2012-2016/17

    Nintendo's less successful consoles have barely lasted five years on the market, their more successful consoles 6 to 7 years. Even then, software support in their final years hasn't been particularly consistent. Given the losses involved with Wii U, and the struggles Nintendo have faced on every front, I think keeping Wii U on the market for four to five years, and continuing to support it with big budget software like an open world Zelda and a Xenoblade Chronicles sequel, is worthy of some respect at least. Personally my experience with Wii U has made me more likely to buy future Nintendo hardware. For all their business struggles, Nintendo's software output has shone.

    I'd also point out that there's no guarantee yet that NX is actually a home console replacement. Far more pressing for Nintendo is the portable market. Is the deal with DeNA really going to make up for the loss of revenue if Nintendo don't replace 3DS in 2016? Let's go by one analysts optimistic estimation of Nintendo going mobile, (which I now can't find the source for) Nintendo could generate an extra $380 million in revenue per year. To put that in perspective, last year the portable console market was worth $3.3 billion globally, with Nintendo taking the lion's share (perhaps as much as 80%) of that revenue. While smartphone games may be a gold rush, they're a gold rush in the same sense that the Californian gold rush resulted in thousands of deaths and bankruptcies. Nintendo can't rely on smartphone 'whales' and I don't think they will. For them, this DeNA deal is about getting access to network building expertise and driving audience growth for dedicated hardware.

    NX (I'm assuming this means Nintendo Kurosu, or Nintendo Cross) is likely going to be one networked platform in multiple configurations. I expect a portable configuration--and in that sense, a 3DS replacement--will come first. 3DS still commands a bigger audience in Japan than Wii or PS3 ever did, some 20 million units and climbing. With revenue from a new portable, smartphone games, a stronger network and whatever Quality of Life turns out to be, Nintendo won't need to rush to replace the ailing Wii U. And if NX is going to come out in multiple configurations, then Nintendo can put a different emphasis on different regions. Japan might be a portable and smartphone driven market, but the West is still strong for home consoles, so the bigger push here would be for NX's home console variant.

    I do share some of the optimism, going forward, though. I'm hoping for one last big E3 this year for 3DS and Wii U. Give the core fans a big send out for their existing hardware, and you can be sure they'll line up for NX when the time comes.
    Reply +9
  • Nintendo to release games on phones and tablets

  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    Also, to pick up Wesley's argument about how we'd feel if Nintendo go for an exploitative Mario endless runner; what if said exploitative Mario endless runner encourages several million smartphone gamers to pick up the next 3D Mario? What if premium Nintendo products, or fairly priced 'free-to-play' Nintendo products, alter the balance and value expectations on smartphones?

    I can't see Nintendo doing anything too terrible here, though they'll obviously have to fight the impulse to aggressively 'monetise' their games. Whatever Nintendo do on smartphones they'll be desperate to avoid damaging the value and reputation of their intellectual property. Nintendo can survive Wii U's commercial failure, and the failure of Wii as a brand; they won't long survive the failure of Mario, Pokemon or Zelda, and I don't think they'll allow the pursuit of money in the smartphone market to invite that kind of brand failure.
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    Wesley's "This will inevitably be terrible" spiel is as bad as Tom's "Everything will be fine" spiel.

    Can't we acknowledge both the enormous potential of this merger, and the enormous challenges Nintendo will have to overcome to make good on that potential?
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    I've never really used the Guardian for gaming news, but this is obviously attracting a lot of mainstream attention and the Guardian have a good write up of this deal:

    In 1983, the mainstream console industry was in a place where smartphone gaming is now: a wild west of mass consumer interest, competing platforms and radically different business models. Atari, the dominant company at that time, went with volume, choking the market with forgettable releases. Nintendo watched, learned and produced quality games. In the 90s, it learned from the Sega Mega Drive and allowed darker, more mature games into its family mix. In the 2000s it learned from the ruinous hardware war between PlayStation and Xbox and produced the Wii, a console with off-the-shelf parts and a weird new controller that people loved. It has misstepped along the way, but it has always learned.

    And through the Yamauchi and Iwata eras, the lesson has always been the same. It is a simple lesson, but it is something so many video game designers, publishers and hardware manufacturers have missed or messed up. It is a lesson that will always be the Nintendo motto.

    Never relinquish control.
    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/mar/17/nintendo-smartphone-iphone-nes-control-satoru-iwata-dena
    Reply +5
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @Nikanoru Being blunt but what Wii and DS did is the new world; simple interfaces and non-traditional games that expanded the audience might not be what Nintendo do now, but they still exist. DS paved the way for iOS as a gaming platform; hell, Apple used to make a big deal about how iOS gaming was catching up to and overtaking DS. The 'expanded' audience are still on iOS and Android, they were briefly on Facebook in large numbers. iOS and Android have more staying power as platforms than Facebook did, they obviously superceded Wii and DS and Nintendo's future involves having a presence on those platforms.

    Nintendo are catching up to what the new gaming industry is. While they could once expand their audience through new hardware, now they have to try and do it by going to where the biggest audience is. No easy feat, by no means guaranteed to succeed, but definitely a sensible plan for the future of their business.
    Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @Nikanoru Nintendo are obviously responding to outside pressures and I would never deny that: the changing market being the main pressure. As you'll see from my other posts on this article and the NX article, I pay close attention to Nintendo's investor briefings and this direction has been sign-posted over the last twelve months. This isn't a capitulation to the investors and shareholders who wanted Nintendo to go mobile only, it's a considered plan for the long-term benefits of Nintendo. And yes, this is a way of Nintendo attracting more users onto their platforms, but they won't do that with low quality software. What incentive would someone unfamiliar with Nintendo have to pay hundreds of pounds on a Nintendo console if Nintendo simply push garbage on smart-devices?

    Also, they're not outsourcing this all to DeNA. DeNA will deal with 'back-end' stuff, like servers and distribution. They'll probably give Nintendo tips about marketing and visibility in the smart-device space. The end product people will receive will be developed by Nintendo:

    "Speaking in a press conference this morning, Nintendo boss Satoru Iwata confirmed Nintendo would take charge of the actual game development - the front-end, gameplay and UI that players actually see."

    But by all means, allow your blinding hatred of the mobile market to skewer your perspective here. Also, I never used the phrase 'actual gaming system'. You may as well accept the new world, where people can be gamers and not touch a games console. There's nothing you can do to change that.
    Reply +2
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @SpaceMonkey77 Erm. You'll have to keep looking forward to that, because Nintendo are making new titles for smartdevices, and not porting existing titles.

    Does EG's article make that clear? I'll have to re-read it.
    Reply +6
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @Malek86 I don't mean 'quality' by the kind of experience you can get on a handheld, and I don't think Iwata means that either. He says it's a matter of creating games which will work well in the conditions of the smart-device market, e.g. good, grounds-up touch-based experiences, rather than porting existing titles.

    In his briefing, he talks about the need to both have quality software and avoid being a one hit wonder in the software market. The fact Nintendo already have a multitude of popular, proven brands will help with that. And, as you point out, they've partnered with DeNA, a firm with a history of sustained success in Japan's large and hyper-competitive smart-device market.

    I'm not saying this is a guaranteed success, but I think it's a surprisingly firm move from a company that would normally just dip their toes in the water, or wait until the bus has passed before they chase it. I think this makes more sense for Nintendo's business in the long-term than anything they've done recently. Obviously it's reliant on Nintendo now executing on the potential of this deal.

    Edit: Missed your edit there. I think amiibo are very deliberately being sold only to Nintendo's long-term fans. If anything, Nintendo's whole strategy in the last financial year has relied on their core consumers for short-term profit and some semblance of stability.

    New 3DS launched with one of the most 'core' experiences you can get on a handheld; Monster Hunter 4. It also launched with a remake of a fan-favourite title, Majora's Mask 3D. New 3DS promised more power, better/more complex controls; not the kind of things that expand your audience. Last year's Alpha/Sapphire remakes are another example of this, as is the presence of Smash. Iwata talked about the need to target older Nintendo fans with more disposable income, and doing so with remakes of their past favourite titles (Sapphire/Majora) and updates to their favourite franchises (Smash debuted 15 or so years ago) was the way to go. Rob Fahey wrote an excellent column on this in the aftermath of last year's E3, 6 months before Iwata basically confirmed that was the plan: http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2014-06-19-nintendos-comeback-strategy-whale-hunting

    Basically while I think amiibo are here to stay and will be a long-term play for the mass-market, right now they're there for the core base that own Wii U and probably bought multiple 3DS units. This is why the scale of Nintendo's move into mobile is a surprise to me. A partial merger with a firm like DeNA and a comprehensive IP licensing deal are much, much bigger plays than launching amiibo with Smash. DeNA are at the heart of Nintendo's long-term strategy; they'll be managing Nintendo's new account based loyalty program (Club Nintendo replacement) across PC, smartdevices, Wii U, 3DS and NX.

    In short, remakes, New 3DS and amiibo were the short-term solutions to losses. NX and the DeNA deal are the long-term solutions to audience stagnation & migration, though I expect Nintendo are planning to build amiibo into their long-term plans.
    Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @bobomb Read the other article. Nintendo are very much continuing their own hardware business. This is a supplement, not an alternative. Reply +3
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @Nikanoru This isn't a plug to appease investors, this is a big move. Nintendo now have a 10% stake in one of Japan's biggest games companies, and DeNA have a 1.24% (the cash stake is equivalent) in Nintendo. It's the kind of merger/acquisition deal Nintendo were talking about a few months ago, when people started to speculate that Capcom or Sega were in Nintendo's sights.

    Nintendo's biggest problem since Wii/DS (and arguably since the SNES) is that they have been unable to grow their audience. That's made all the more difficult by hundreds of millions of people being brought into the games industry without ever touching a games controller, let alone a Nintendo IP.

    If you read the full statement, too, you'll also see Iwata isn't going to allow smart-devices to be a dumping ground for Nintendo IP. While every IP is available, only a select few will be worked on at any one time, and the quality of the experience will be the main goal. There's no point in exposing a huge market to a Nintendo IP if it's a low quality product, and Nintendo know that.
    Reply +1
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    @Mr_V Recent financial results show Nintendo returning to profit.

    I'd also point out Iwata has been saying over the last 12 months Nintendo need to find a way to take advantage of smart devices in order to grow their own dedicated hardware business. Where's the future for Nintendo if kids aren't exposed to Mario & Pokemon? 3DS's big boosts recently have come from 12 to 15 year old ports/franchises (Majora's Mask, Ruby/Sapphire, Smash Bros) because people that played those titles when they were younger now have more disposable income. Again, Iwata illustrated this in a recent briefing.

    This isn't what investors wanted. Investors wanted Nintendo to dump their current and past games on smart devices en masse, or to go smart-device only. A partnership with DeNA is a smart move, as far as I'm concerned. Nintendo still have their own hardware business and have announced their next platform, but they're no longer keeping all their eggs in that basket. Managed correctly, this could be the boost Nintendo need in order to remain relevant outside of a core niche.
    Reply +3
  • Nintendo NX is "new hardware with a brand new concept"

  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    Also I'd point out given the use of X in Japanese titles (Project X/Cross Zone, Xenoblade Chronicles X/Cross), that NX is most likely "Nintendo Cross Platform". Last year Iwata described the unified Nintendo Network as being the future platform available across multiple devices, rather than each piece of hardware being an individual platform like Wii U and 3DS. As I said, I think we're going to see games that can be played across smart-devices, a portable and a home console. I expect there'll be higher spec/more complex titles available exclusively on the portable and home devices. Reply 0
  • Mr.Spo 17/03/2015

    At this stage it's hard to tell what the NX is, exactly, but in an image published on Nintendo's official website, it's described as a "dedicated game system", which suggests a home console of some kind. We're told more information will be revealed next year.
    Or a you know, portable console, the primary driver of Nintendo's business. My bet is a powerful mobile chipset available in a home console configuration and a weaker, cheaper portable configuration. Shared architecture, shared operating system, shared development tools. Cross-buy and unified account as standard, with some major titles being exclusive to one hardware variant. Using mobile chipsets would also allow Nintendo to sell at a low price and turn a profit on the hardware, keep development costs and times low, and keep the form factor and energy consumption low. It ticks a lot of boxes Nintendo look for in their hardware design.

    Interesting times ahead.
    Reply +2