The cycling thread Page 334

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  • elstoof 9 Jun 2014 21:56:41 6,631 posts
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    Fulcrums usually have a crater/hole in the brake track, that's a wear indicator. When that disappears, the rims are, you guessed it, worn out.
  • caligari 9 Jun 2014 22:12:41 16,999 posts
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    elstoof wrote:
    Fulcrums usually have a crater/hole in the brake track, that's a wear indicator. When that disappears, the rims are, you guessed it, worn out.
    Ah, right - so it's just something that happens with this particular brand? I hope they hold out for another few weeks - at least until I've actually ordered a new wheelset.

    Would you say that four years is an okay lifespan for a set of wheels? I don't know how I'd feel if I'd spent more than 200 on these things - but then look at what happens to the value of our console/PC purchases in the same amount of time.

    They've served me well, though - even though the aforementioned bearings have been a bit of a pain.
  • elstoof 9 Jun 2014 22:45:19 6,631 posts
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    All rims are going to wear out eventually from the friction of the braking action. Dirty rims and pads accelerate the corrosion. They all go concave with wear, there's nothing wrong with that, it's the thickness of the remaining rim that's important. You can get some calipers to measure it at a few places, usually accepted as fine as long as there's still a third of the material left - manufacturers often put a wear indicator in to make it easier to tell. In Fulcrums case, a little hole on the outside that's 2/3s deep into the rim so when the hole disappears you know it's time to get a new wheel. Mavic put a hole on the inside so when it appears you know. Some other brands put a groove along the whole track.

    Cartridge bearings like in R5s are so cheap and easy to replace, they make them cheaply from softer materials as a result and they basically a disposable item.
  • caligari 9 Jun 2014 23:28:25 16,999 posts
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    Are there any bits that are worth salvaging from the R5s - or is a straight bin-job?

    I've sent a cheeky E-mail to my work's HQ - I'm trying to convince them that they should allow me to purchase a wheelset on my new C2W order. I sprinkled the E-mail with lots of 'buzz' words, such as 'safety' and 'commute' - let's see how polite they are when they tell me to 'shove off'.
  • gang_of_bitches 10 Jun 2014 08:48:17 5,442 posts
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    Just been watching yesterday's Criterium highlights. Great ride from Froome and while they did drop off fairly early the rest of the Sky team were looking stronger than I've seen so far this year.
  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 09:14:29 6,631 posts
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    caligari wrote:
    Are there any bits that are worth salvaging from the R5s - or is a straight bin-job?
    Not really, you "could" save the hubs for spares, but the cost of spokes and a rebuild would be near enough to the price of a new wheelset to not make it worthwhile.
  • MikeP 10 Jun 2014 10:53:34 1,771 posts
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    Elstoof's right on all the points about wear, and the causes. I could never find the wear indicators on my Fulcrums, even from new. Which was odd.

    When the rim fails due to wear it'll go catastrophically. It normally happens when you pump the tyres up, the rim can't resist the increase in pressure, and fails. It sounds like a shotgun going off.

    That increase in pressure scenario could also be caused by frictional heating of the air in the tube caused by repeated braking on a long descent, so the consequences can be bad.



    Edited by MikeP at 11:15:54 10-06-2014
  • basmans_grob 10 Jun 2014 11:19:39 264 posts
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    I saw somebody's rims go mid ride as well. That didn't end well for him.
  • convz 10 Jun 2014 11:35:22 352 posts
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    This is probably a silly question, but on my regular commute there are lots of drains (probably extending 30cm into the road) and they're very bumpy where the tarmac has worn away around them - I can't decide whether I'm better off sticking close to the curb and getting a bit bruised/potentially damaging the bike(?!) or whether to try to avoid the bumps and potentially annoy drivers... any thoughts?
  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 11:44:03 6,631 posts
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    You're riding much too close to the kerb, and it helps no one. Drivers assume there's more room and are inclined to overtake when not overly safe, you're riding through all the road debris and through gutters.

    Google "cycle craft" and "primary position" for more info.
  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 11:48:17 6,631 posts
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    MikeP wrote:

    I could never find the wear indicators on my Fulcrums, even from new. Which was odd.
    R5s might not have one. R7s do, my Zondas, which are basically R3s, do. I couldn't find any definitive proof online that the R5s do though. In which case, you'll need to get a set of dental calipers from ebay and take a few thickness measurements - 1/3 of the original thickness is a general cutoff point of a rim's life.
  • convz 10 Jun 2014 13:11:30 352 posts
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    Thank you elstoof... to be honest looking at the image here I cycle between the secondary position and the kerb, which like you said probably isn't doing any good to my safety or the bike! I try to get as close to the kerb without hitting it, which I've managed to do until now, but I will adjust my position so at the very least I'm not smashing over the pot holes etc
  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 13:17:29 6,631 posts
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    Much safer to ride along the path of a cars left wheels to stop dangerous pass attempts and make you more visible. If you're swerving out to avoid a pothole when a car tries to speed past, it could be very nasty. Hold your line in the road like a boss, pull in when it's safe for you to do so and let cars pass when the conditions are safest for you.
  • convz 10 Jun 2014 13:50:56 352 posts
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    Thank you elstoof :) I drive on the same road and it's a fairly short journey - I try to go as fast as I can (legs still getting tired) but since it's flat I'm hoping I can consistently maintain a speed that isn't too irritating to drivers. There are plenty of overtaking opportunities though and if there is a lorry or a bus behind me I usually pull over.
  • DaM 10 Jun 2014 14:08:00 12,901 posts
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    Don't worry about your speed for drivers - you'll be "holding them up" if you are doing much less that 30, which is likely :) As long as you are visible and not weaving about, that's the best you can do.

    I've just finished helping with a Bikeability course, and the kids are told about 60cm out from the kerb - and to give parked car a doors width, about a metre.
  • convz 10 Jun 2014 14:20:53 352 posts
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    Thanks DaM, good points - I think I'm probably doing around 15mph on flats, maybe a bit more - so yeah, I have a long way to go! :) And thanks for the info, 60cm sounds good to me!
  • DaM 10 Jun 2014 16:13:39 12,901 posts
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    Bugger, just had a puncture in a monsoon. Then remembered the kids playing with my pump in the kitchen....had to call for rescue :)

    Does anyone use any anti-puncture measures? I used to have some plasticy stuff that lined the tyres. And how about that emergency stuff you fill up the inner tube with, anyone use that?
  • gang_of_bitches 10 Jun 2014 16:21:32 5,442 posts
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    @DaM

    Haven't seen the plastic lining stuff in years, but I do remember it not being massively effective or good for riding on.

    Some shit had spread tacks on the road at Headley Common near Box Hill on Sunday, got two in my front tyre. Still with 2 levers, a spare tube and a Co2 cartridge I was up and running again in no more than 5 minutes and they really don't take up much space. Those Co2 things really are a godsend, no more messing around with a mini pump barely getting to 80psi.
  • DaM 10 Jun 2014 16:24:54 12,901 posts
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    gang_of_bitches wrote:
    Haven't seen the plastic lining stuff in years, but I do remember it not being massively effective or good for riding on.
    .
    That's my recollection too...maybe OK for the main tread, but no great for anything just off it.

    I'll get the CO2 canisters, and there are a few puncture resistant semi-slick tyres and some thick inner tubes on Amazon. Will get my MTB set up with those.
  • caligari 10 Jun 2014 20:13:19 16,999 posts
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    DaM wrote:
    Bugger, just had a puncture in a monsoon. Then remembered the kids playing with my pump in the kitchen....had to call for rescue :)

    Does anyone use any anti-puncture measures? I used to have some plasticy stuff that lined the tyres. And how about that emergency stuff you fill up the inner tube with, anyone use that?
    Do you mean 'slime' innertubes? It sounded good but I think I remember reading that they were pretty heavy. Probably not such an issue if you're using them for MTB-ing.

    I still use their funky quick-seal 'skabs' puncture repair kit, though:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Slime-Skabs-Peel-Stick-Patches/dp/B0011YHCY6/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1402427100&sr=8-9&keywords=slime+puncture

    As for avoiding punctures - I'd say that making sure you tyres at are always at their correct PSI is a good start. It's not very fun, but I'd also avoid certain 'rough' bike paths - the type that are usually littered with broken glass/thorns/syringes/bones.

    Give your tyres a quick check over after a ride to make sure that there's nothing already trying to work its way through to your innertube (I wish I could say that I remembered to do this every time I've been out - I probably do it twice a year).

    I'd also recommend AGAINST using puncture proof tyres - I have Schwalbe Marathon Plus fitted to one of my single-speeds. They're so amazingly slow and heavy in comparison to my other single-speed (which runs puncture-happy cheapies). I think I'd sacrifice the puncture protection for the extra speed!

    Get yourself some nylon tyre levers, too. They're not as harsh on your rims as the metal versions, and I seem to get fewer 'nipped' innertubes when using them - although perhaps I'm just getting better at fixing punctures (pffft).

    So - to sum it up - don't use your bike and you'll be fine!

    Edited by caligari at 20:19:24 10-06-2014
  • caligari 10 Jun 2014 20:20:29 16,999 posts
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    Crumbs - was just speaking to a young neighbour - the poor kid had his bike stolen outside Halfords a few days ago. Ironically he was there to complain about a faulty bicycle lock. :s
  • caligari 10 Jun 2014 20:27:45 16,999 posts
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    MikeP wrote:
    Elstoof's right on all the points about wear, and the causes. I could never find the wear indicators on my Fulcrums, even from new. Which was odd.
    I'm ashamed to admit that my wheels are usually so dirty that I'd never notice wear indicators.
  • mal 10 Jun 2014 22:33:22 22,341 posts
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    My front wheel had an annoying slow puncture which would have been a pain to patch and I couldn't really be arsed taking the tyre off at the time, so I plugged in a can of Lidl goo with CO2. The tyre's now noticeably more sluggish (or my legs have atrophied, one or t'other), but it fixed the problem good and proper. I suspect I may have to cut the tyre off to get it off the bike, mind you.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 22:52:20 6,631 posts
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    I use sealant in tyres often with good success - I ride mostly on tubular tyres. I sealed a slow puncture yesterday in fact, picked up from a very flinty Chilterns run on sunday that claimed 9 punctures from a group of 11 riders.

    I only take a spare tyre on long rides and even then I've never used it - sealant has always gotten me home where I can glue a tyre properly.
  • elstoof 10 Jun 2014 22:55:24 6,631 posts
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    I wouldn't use sealant in a clincher tube though, patches all the way.
  • caligari 10 Jun 2014 22:59:36 16,999 posts
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    Ah, of course - I'd completely forgotten about tubeless.
  • Bremenacht 10 Jun 2014 23:13:09 17,613 posts
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    I use slime/gunk type stuff and swear by it. The first clue that someone has been trimming the hawthorn hedges along some paths is all the twigs pinned to your tyres, twanging as they pass through the forks.

    Whereas once it'd mean end of ride, now I can just pull them all out and get riding quickly, knowing the gunk/slime will plug all the gaps for minimal loss of psi.

    Unless you're at a level of ability where you'd notice the impact of an extra few hundred grams on your riding (and timing), then it's well worth considering the stuff. Wont help much if broken glass or similar is your problem though - only a spare tube would do there.
  • MikeP 11 Jun 2014 08:22:46 1,771 posts
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    Another good thing is to check tyres periodically for cuts. Up to 5mm long ones can be easily sealed by deflating the tyre, pinching the cut open, dribbling a bit of superglue in there and holding it shut.
  • DaM 11 Jun 2014 11:28:01 12,901 posts
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    I've removed the Schwalbe Marathon Plus from my Amazon basket, but will try out some Raleigh thick inner tubes, tyre liners and maybe the gunk.
  • Benno 12 Jun 2014 08:32:41 9,796 posts
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    Post deleted
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