The cycling thread Page 152

  • Page

    of 322 First / Last

  • Deleted user 18 September 2012 19:45:26
    Quick question: Anyone else fallen off a bike going up hill?

    It would make me feel better if someone else said yes :redface:
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 01:04:25 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Sure, but I doubt the sort of hill you're talking about. :D
  • Deleted user 19 September 2012 07:16:40
    Haha, oh well. Do you have any tips for hill climbling? Is there any techiniques with gears or styles, or is it just a case of building fitness and muscle strength?
  • Salaman 19 Sep 2012 08:58:12 18,251 posts
    Seen 5 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Apostle wrote:
    Quick question: Anyone else fallen off a bike going up hill?

    It would make me feel better if someone else said yes :redface:
    Here you go. Don't feel too bad.
  • elstoof 19 Sep 2012 09:19:25 6,141 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Apostle wrote:
    Haha, oh well. Do you have any tips for hill climbling? Is there any techiniques with gears or styles, or is it just a case of building fitness and muscle strength?
    Lose as much weight as you can, on the bike and your gut. Have a look at interval training when on the turbo. Figure out what sort of cadence you tend to pedal in when climbing, try to settle into a rhythm 110rpm or so using whatever gear suits that pace. Alternatively wait for a bus going up to draft behind :p
  • MikeP 19 Sep 2012 09:52:59 1,676 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Pistol will be able to give loads of advice, as he's quite content smashing his way around the Alps, but generally climbing comes down to power to weight ratio, and how much power you can sustain aerobically over a period of time.

    Elstoof is right about settling into a rhythm, find a gear you can turn over easily, spin the cranks rather than grinding out the climb in a push-push motion. Also, on a sustained climb go easy at the bottom so you can judge your effort. If it's hurting at the bottom of the climb it'll hurt all the way up.

    Also, try to spend most of the time sat down in the saddle. Standing up can help use other muscles, but for most people it'll really bumps up the heart rate for not a huge amount of extra progress.

    If it's any comfort I used to dread climbing, and thought I was useless. But I found a good hill to practice on near me and went from struggling up it in my smallest gear once, to now being able to put in 5-6 laps in the middleish part of my gears over the space of about 6 weeks. With effort you can see big improvements quite quickly.
  • Deleted user 19 September 2012 10:12:12
    Salaman wrote:Here you go. Don't feel too bad.
    Haha, that's exactly what happened to me! Came to a stop, tried to put my foot down and buckled over. That hill looks a nightmare though, god those cobbles.

    Thanks for the tips guys. Last night was the first time I stood trying to power up, I think I'd of got 3/4s up had my gears not been funny (my fault for not fixing though). Normally I sat but lost so much momentum it feels wrong going at 1mph with legs spinning in a high gear. Certainly feel like I've improved though. The hills earlier in my route I can do without much problem now. Also I finished the whole route last night, which is a first for me since starting about 3 weeks ago. Trying to work out how far I cycled at the moment.

    Ok google can't go down all the different tracks/paths, but I estimate about 7-8miles in total. Wow. Didn't think it was that much at all.

    Edited by Apostle at 10:19:24 19-09-2012
  • MikeP 19 Sep 2012 10:36:32 1,676 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    @Vortex808 I went to the launch event for this service last night.

    http://www.pannier.cc/

    They are doing accommodation mapping for some of the main UK cycle tours. Early days yet, but if I'd had that it would have saved loads of time on the planning.

    Deffo worth a look.
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 10:58:07 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Salaman wrote:
    Here you go. Don't feel too bad.
    lol Roadies. That's not a hill. I appreciate that the fact they haven't sanded and levelled the surface probably isn't helping you though. :p
  • Trafford 19 Sep 2012 11:05:21 5,273 posts
    Seen 16 minutes ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    That's not Paris-Roubaix I gather.
  • Salaman 19 Sep 2012 11:16:38 18,251 posts
    Seen 5 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Trafford wrote:
    That's not Paris-Roubaix I gather.
    Paris-Roubaix is flat but brutally cobbly.
    This is from the Tour of Flanders. There's a number of short/steep/cobbled hills in it. The day before the race, amateur riders can cycle along the race parcours and give it a go. It's more brutal than it looks. Especially the succession of long sloping bits/steep little hills and the complete lack of recuperation opportunity when they go flying over these in the race's final make it tricky.

    Don't be deceived by the video. It's not a high hill (we don't really get those in Belgium) but the steepest part has a 22% incline.
  • Trafford 19 Sep 2012 11:26:43 5,273 posts
    Seen 16 minutes ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    I'm not a fan of cobbles, especially the slimy ones.
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 11:41:04 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    In fairness, I really wouldn't like to do that with those tyres either. Doesn't seem like it would be a great deal of fun.
  • MetalDog 19 Sep 2012 11:42:31 23,706 posts
    Seen 5 days ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    In the absence of the ability to keep a motorcycle upright, I have gone the path of a hybrid bike. I look forward to skinning something for the first time in over a decade as soon as the lights and helmet turn up.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • Salaman 19 Sep 2012 12:09:51 18,251 posts
    Seen 5 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    What happened to the motorcycle plan then? Did you fall and end up pinned under your bike?
  • MetalDog 19 Sep 2012 13:07:55 23,706 posts
    Seen 5 days ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    I broke a bit off one of the schools bikes and decided to re-familiarise myself with my sense of balance on something less expensive. I seem to have real trouble with the weight of motorbikes - once they go past a very early tipping point, I can't stop them from dropping. Noodle muscles.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • MikeP 19 Sep 2012 13:39:53 1,676 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    @Psychotext you have to keep up a decent lick to skim over the top of the cobbles/paviers on skinny tyres, but obviously on a 20% slope that's a wee bit tricky!

    Moving up from a 23mm to a 25mm tyre makes a surprising difference, especially as you only run the latter at 95-100 psi, as opposed to about 125.

    Are you exclusively a knuckle-dragging MTBer then? ;)

    /returns to his doppio espresso and copy of Rouleur
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 13:45:09 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    I am now, yeah. It's a completely different experience to dodging trucks, buses, car doors and things being thrown.

    Put me in the middle of a woodland with my bike and I'm in heaven.
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 13:49:17 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Example, this was what I was up to on the weekend (same trail, but this isn't my vid): http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=zIbDhOulB5E

    Those are the downhill bits, but there were some excellent slow sections following a stream. Pretty much unmatched if you have a thing for nature. :)

    Edited by Psychotext at 14:00:18 19-09-2012
  • pistol 19 Sep 2012 14:06:08 13,019 posts
    Seen 4 months ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Apostle wrote:
    Haha, oh well. Do you have any tips for hill climbling? Is there any techiniques with gears or styles, or is it just a case of building fitness and muscle strength?
    Just seen this..

    MikeP has pretty much summed up how to improve your climbing, but it can depend on the type of climbs you're referring to. In the UK most tend to be short efforts and anything with a steep gradient, say 10-25% are in the most part short and sharp. For these climbs you can use a combo of seated and standing. Depending on what type of gear ratios you have, climbing a 20%er entirely seated can be a challenge, especially if you're not used to it.

    A few tips below to help..

    1. Practie practice practice. It's a cliche but climbing hills gets you better at climbing hills.
    2. Ensure bike is set up properly, i.e. seat height, fore/after. If set up wrong, climbing will be harder than necessary.
    3. Weight loss is key. The lighter you are, the quicker you'll climb. It is all about power to weight ratio, so lose the weight sensibly. Too fast or too much and you'll lose power too.

    4. On the climb itself, try and use a cadence that doesn't require too much grinding, i.e. faster than you would on the flat if possible. The specific number of revs is personal. Do what you can sustain.

    5. Approach the climb in the right gear so you don't have to shift down half way through, as you will lose rythum.

    6. Seated for as much as possible with the occasional standing to get you over the really tricky parts. The more you're out the saddle the more you will get fatigued.

    I used these techniques on the Marmotte Sportive in French Alps this year and it worked well. One of the climbs was 37km long.

    Hope this helps
  • pistol 19 Sep 2012 14:07:47 13,019 posts
    Seen 4 months ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Salaman wrote:
    Trafford wrote:
    That's not Paris-Roubaix I gather.
    Paris-Roubaix is flat but brutally cobbly.
    This is from the Tour of Flanders. There's a number of short/steep/cobbled hills in it. The day before the race, amateur riders can cycle along the race parcours and give it a go. It's more brutal than it looks. Especially the succession of long sloping bits/steep little hills and the complete lack of recuperation opportunity when they go flying over these in the race's final make it tricky.

    Don't be deceived by the video. It's not a high hill (we don't really get those in Belgium) but the steepest part has a 22% incline.
    Salaman is right, PB is a tough route, and some of the pro's have to take a week off the bike after the event due to the amount of vibration that goes througth their body from the cobbles.
  • MikeP 19 Sep 2012 14:15:56 1,676 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Psychotext wrote:
    Example, this was what I was up to on the weekend (same trail, but this isn't my vid): http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=zIbDhOulB5E

    Those are the downhill bits, but there were some excellent slow sections following a stream. Pretty much unmatched if you have a thing for nature. :)
    That looks lovely. If I lived anywhere remotely approaching countryside I'd get right back into mountain bikes, in my unending quest to own n+1 bikes
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 14:25:50 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Well, I drive an hour and a half to get there, so you might be surprised at where you're in range of. Strangely London (just as an example, I don't know where you are) was named one of the top 10 cities in the UK for mountain biking.
  • Deleted user 19 September 2012 14:32:12
    @pistol Crikey, 37km! Thanks for the advice, I will keep at it. I can imagine the pleasure at beating a hill can be worth all the effort.
  • Salaman 19 Sep 2012 14:34:03 18,251 posts
    Seen 5 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    pistol wrote:
    Salaman is right, PB is a tough route, and some of the pro's have to take a week off the bike after the event due to the amount of vibration that goes througth their body from the cobbles.
    This is a pretty good video of it.
  • pistol 19 Sep 2012 14:57:45 13,019 posts
    Seen 4 months ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Apostle wrote:
    @pistol Crikey, 37km! Thanks for the advice, I will keep at it. I can imagine the pleasure at beating a hill can be worth all the effort.
    The Marmotte is 4 long climbs back to back, and below is 2 of them.

    http://velonews.competitor.com/2010/10/gallery/2011-tour-de-france-route-profiles_146952/attachment/tdf11_eta-19_galibier_1
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 16:12:01 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Salaman wrote:
    This is a pretty good video of it.
    Must be a really odd feeling given how many bumps are normally encountered in road racing.
  • MikeP 19 Sep 2012 17:40:39 1,676 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    There's a cracking film documentary from the 1970's about Paris Roubaix called A Sunday in Hell. It got removed from YouTube, but you can still view and download it here:

    http://www.veoh.com/watch/v20924403zBshk7AE?h1=A+sunday+in+hell
  • Dougs 19 Sep 2012 18:53:42 64,912 posts
    Seen 5 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Top tips, cheers pistol, gives me some pointers where I'm going wrong. Which is mainly being in too low a gear and cranking through a bit too much.

    I need a gizmo so I can check cadence etc. Any recommendations? Not after GPS or anything, so something quite basic should work, but don't want a piece of shit that will fall over after a few months.
  • Psychotext 19 Sep 2012 18:59:54 52,802 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Cateye cycle computer. Cheap, and pretty much bombproof.

    I got a wireless one that works on my rear wheel so I can still use it on my turbo trainer.

    Edit - Oh, apparently not. The one I bought isn't available any more, and the nearest equivalent really isn't that cheap.

    Edited by Psychotext at 19:05:54 19-09-2012
  • Page

    of 322 First / Last

Log in or register to reply