Astronomy Page 12

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  • chopsen 24 Jun 2013 09:59:39 16,290 posts
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    B0rked_Gamer wrote:
    Chopsen wrote:
    That happens occasionally.

    Not over such a large area of sky. Birds got confused and started chirping early as well. :)
    1. Birds are idiots

    2. It's also around the summer solstice. We don't get properly dark at all and sunrise is before 5am.

    3. And yes, this does happen occasionally over a large area of sky

    Edited by Chopsen at 10:00:12 24-06-2013
  • tombo 24 Jun 2013 11:15:40 2,100 posts
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    It looked gorgeous to me.
  • b0rk 24 Jun 2013 11:33:27 2,945 posts
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    Chopsen wrote:
    B0rked_Gamer wrote:
    Chopsen wrote:
    That happens occasionally.

    Not over such a large area of sky. Birds got confused and started chirping early as well. :)
    1. Birds are idiots

    2. It's also around the summer solstice. We don't get properly dark at all and sunrise is before 5am.

    3. And yes, this does happen occasionally over a large area of sky
    Er, that's not true because I'm up every night throughout the AM and it has been getting properly dark easily enough to see the stars with the Moon out and all the light pollution.
  • chopsen 24 Jun 2013 15:40:28 16,290 posts
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    Blimey.

    What I'm saying is that the moon is occasionally bright enough to obscure the stars. The brightness of the moon last night, in the history of bright moons that I have personally experienced, was nothing to sing about. The combination of the moon being at it's closest in its orbit and also being full is not that rare an occurrence. It's no biggie. I've seen more impressive things, and the impressiveness of the moon last night didn't register on the list of impressive things I've seen which I would consider noteworthy. Hell, I've had moonlight bright enough to read by in the past. That was cool. Last night was a night of relative but ultimately unremarkable brightness in the variation of night brightness that I have direct knowledge of having existed.

    The fact that we're near the summer solstice contributes to that brightness, as you don't get full "astronomical darkness" at this time of year, as I don't think the Sun ever goes far enough below the horizon. It may also have contributed to the fact that the birds were out.

    Now, I'm off to check out the brownest piece of cardboard someone's found and most transparent glass of water anyone's seen in weeks.
  • Bremenacht 24 Jun 2013 15:48:12 19,666 posts
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    localnotail wrote:
    It was the Supermoon yesterday (perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system) - closest and largest full moon all year. That is kind of exciting.
    The last full moon looked enoooooooormous when rising a month or so back.
  • b0rk 24 Jun 2013 15:54:00 2,945 posts
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    Chopsen wrote:
    Blimey.

    What I'm saying is that the moon is occasionally bright enough to obscure the stars. The brightness of the moon last night, in the history of bright moons that I have personally experienced, was nothing to sing about. The combination of the moon being at it's closest in its orbit and also being full is not that rare an occurrence. It's no biggie. I've seen more impressive things, and the impressiveness of the moon last night didn't register on the list of impressive things I've seen which I would consider noteworthy. Hell, I've had moonlight bright enough to read by in the past. That was cool. Last night was a night of relative but ultimately unremarkable brightness in the variation of night brightness that I have direct knowledge of having existed.

    The fact that we're near the summer solstice contributes to that brightness, as you don't get full "astronomical darkness" at this time of year, as I don't think the Sun ever goes far enough below the horizon. It may also have contributed to the fact that the birds were out.

    Now, I'm off to check out the brownest piece of cardboard someone's found and most transparent glass of water anyone's seen in weeks.
    All that's great and I'm sure all factually correct but I just go with what I'm seeing with my eyes.

    Now I'm off to Stonehenge.
  • Bremenacht 24 Jun 2013 15:54:02 19,666 posts
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    B0rked_Gamer wrote:
    Er, that's not true because I'm up every night throughout the AM and it has been getting properly dark easily enough to see the stars with the Moon out and all the light pollution.
    Can't say I've seen anything like 'properly dark' for a couple of months.

    Of course, I'm assuming that 'properly dark' is darker than the well-established 'quite dark', 'rather dark' and arguably even 'very dark', but not as dark as 'very, very dark' or 'exactly dark', depending on which system of darkness measurement you adhere to.
  • b0rk 24 Jun 2013 15:56:30 2,945 posts
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    I go by the blackness factor. Exactly how more black can the night get, and last week when I was poking my head out the window having a smoke I remarked to myself that the night was quite black.
  • chopsen 24 Jun 2013 15:59:27 16,290 posts
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    It's like, how much more black could this be? and the answer is none. None more black.
  • b0rk 24 Jun 2013 16:02:31 2,945 posts
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    \o/
  • Penguinzoot 24 Jun 2013 16:24:10 496 posts
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    Properly dark skies (termed astronomically dark skies) only occur when the sun sinks 18 degrees below the horizon. For several weeks either side of the summer solstice this does not occur at UK latitudes. Hence, during this time British skies are not truly astronomically dark, even with no moon around.

    Under astronomically dark skies, stars down to sixth magnitude can be viewed as naked eye objects, as long as you at at a dark sky site (no light pollution), your eyesight is dark adapted, and your eyes are up to it, of course ;).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twilight

    Edited by Penguinzoot at 16:28:35 24-06-2013
  • Bremenacht 24 Jun 2013 16:31:25 19,666 posts
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    Well. Deckard asks a perfectly reasonable Q and someone gives an answer like that. There's always one.
  • b0rk 24 Jun 2013 16:34:30 2,945 posts
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    Astronomically dark this astronomically dark that. It all looks black to me. :(
  • Penguinzoot 24 Jun 2013 16:37:17 496 posts
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    @Bremenacht My apologies ;)
  • Short-Round 25 Jun 2013 22:49:45 1,181 posts
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    If anyone missed the super moon, it's back, and it's blood red. It's very low on the horizon (I'm in East London, and it's pretty much at eye level, so no looking up at clouds).
  • Bremenacht 10 Jul 2013 01:30:32 19,666 posts
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    How NASA steers the International Space Station around space junk
  • RightBean 16 Jul 2013 02:21:15 662 posts
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    Hubble telescope discovers new Neptune moon

    Good old hubble eh?
  • ZuluHero 16 Jul 2013 03:03:45 4,343 posts
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    We spend so much time looking out of our solar system that we forget that theres still loads of stuff to discover within it. Fascinating.

    Edited by ZuluHero at 03:04:20 16-07-2013
  • Folant 16 Jul 2013 03:30:04 1,613 posts
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    ZuluHero wrote:
    We spend so much time looking out of our solar system that we forget that theres still loads of stuff to discover within it. Fascinating.
    Same could be said About Earth.

    But yes, really quite interesting.

    Posted from my Nexus 4, not using Tapatalk 4.

  • senso-ji 23 Jul 2013 14:07:08 6,045 posts
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    Pictures of Earth, taken from Saturn
  • ZuluHero 23 Jul 2013 14:14:26 4,343 posts
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    I waved! :)
  • Deleted user 23 July 2013 14:34:47
    Makes you feel quite small doesn't it...
  • S.J.Rogers 23 Jul 2013 14:46:48 3,557 posts
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    BillCityfingers wrote:
    Makes you feel quite small doesn't it...
    Speak for yourself..!
  • Psychotext 23 Jul 2013 14:51:30 55,057 posts
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    Didn't I tell you, baby, I'm Zaphod Beeblebrox!
  • Razz 23 Jul 2013 14:58:32 61,664 posts
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    The moon is much further than I had imagined

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  • Deleted user 23 July 2013 17:03:42
    @S.J.Rogers I would come back at you with a witty retort but I don't have one so I'll settle for: :-P
  • ILoveThrashMetal 23 Jul 2013 20:59:44 827 posts
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    An interesting horizon tonight, showing all different types of new telescopes being used and about to be used.
    Very interesting watch

    Arsechickens

  • Bremenacht 23 Jul 2013 23:40:44 19,666 posts
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    Is that series a repeat? I'm sure I've watched it before. Still relevant though, given that the James Webb telescope is currently scheduled for a 2018 launch - so far away!
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