I remember back in the good 'ol days...

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  • Sardonicus 29 Jun 2003 18:43:58 4 posts
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    Here's one for the knowledge-meisters out there.

    Does anybody remember when the RETURN key became the ENTER key? You never see it anymore... where did it go?

    Plus when did people stop putting "th" after the date? Like when 17th of June became June 17. Just look on the BBC's website and you'll see even they've succumbed. I want my dates back!! Plus it doesn't really make sense when they say "And on March 3 dogs bit an old man." ..WTF?
    3 dogs bit a man in March or an unknown quantity on March the 3rd?

    Don't even get me started on missing out the word "ON" from "A dog bit a man Monday".

    Nurse, more tablets please!!
  • Moonbender 29 Jun 2003 18:57:08 407 posts
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    Well, English date descriptions have always been sort of a mystery to me. Not to mention the various orders in which day, month and year are written down.
  • CerealKey 29 Jun 2003 19:09:14 2,860 posts
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    Sardonicus wrote:
    Here's one for the knowledge-meisters out there.

    Does anybody remember when the RETURN key became the ENTER key? You never see it anymore... where did it go?



    What are you talking about? It isn't even those, it's an arrow on the key. Enter or Return depends on what you are doing: 'Enter' inputs information into a program and Return signifies the cursor moving onto the next line.

    Plus when did people stop putting "th" after the date? Like when 17th of June became June 17. Just look on the BBC's website and you'll see even they've succumbed. I want my dates back!! Plus it doesn't really make sense when they say "And on March 3 dogs bit an old man." ..WTF?
    3 dogs bit a man in March or an unknown quantity on March the 3rd?

    It's just stylistic, does it really need the addition of st, th, rd to make sense. As for your example of dog biting, that's just bad writing. It should read "And on March 3, dogs bit an old man."

    The Guardian style guide has an entry for dates.

    dates
    January 1 2000 (no commas)
    It is occasionally alleged that putting month before date in this way is an "Americanisation"; in which case it should be pointed out that this has been our style since the first issue of the Manchester Guardian on May 5 1821



    Don't even get me started on missing out the word "ON" from "A dog bit a man Monday".

    Which part of the body is a Monday?


    Edited by CerealKey at 18:43:10 29-06-2003
  • Alexxis 29 Jun 2003 19:09:24 23 posts
    Registered 11 years ago
    Speaking of keys, I would really like to know what the little key marked SysRq is for. I can't really find any explanation as to its history, just some vague thing about it being magic (eek!).

    Oh, and I am new here too /waves 8)

    I found this site yesterday!
  • Sardonicus 29 Jun 2003 19:54:41 4 posts
    Registered 11 years ago
    Cerealkey - I know that the "Enter" key performs the function of a carriage return as well as to "enter" information, but I was just wondering when the actual name on the keyboard changed. On the Commodore 64 it was labelled a "Return" key. On the PC it's labelled "Enter".

    And with the "On March 3, dogs bit a man"... well, try saying it out loud. Comma or not, it can be ambiguous. That's why the "rd" is needed. So why did is disappear from written text? That's the point I was trying to make.

    Same thing with "A dog bit a man Monday". Except this time putting a comma in makes it bad writing and it STILL doesn't make sense.

    Alexxis - SysRq could stand for System Requirements? But I've never had the courage to press it, myself...

  • Whizzo 29 Jun 2003 20:27:31 43,033 posts
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    The SysRq key was introduced with the IBM PC-AT, when IBM intended it to be used for task switching and other stuff when people unleashed the AT's power! Well that was rather a long time ago and nobody ever did use it for what IBM envisioned but it's still there, confusing people ever since. The old IBM keyboards were as tough as old boots and I'm sure some are still in use like an old Landrover!

    Oh dear I can actually remember the introduction of the AT, although it was a couple of years after they came out I used one professionally...

    Edited by Whizzo at 19:28:09 29-06-2003

    This space left intentionally blank.

  • Moonbender 29 Jun 2003 20:34:36 407 posts
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    As far as I know, the bottom right key on the numpad was always designated "Enter", while the big key in the middle of the keyboard was always called "Return", although I don't think I've ever seen it labelled like that, it's usually a sort of arrow. I'm not sure if that's different from the way it is on the Amiga, but I think it's always been that way in the PC world.

    The three keys in the top right of the keyboard, in the line of the function keys F1 to F12 are basically derelicts. The left one still performs a screenshot, though, press it together with alt to get a screenshot of only the current window. I don't think I've ever seen the middle one, labeled "scroll" (actually, "Rollen") on my keyboard, do anything apart from toggling the scroll lock LED. The right one ("Pause") also doesn't do a whole lot, although some games use it as a pause key. It also pauses output in the console, including right after the BIOS POST, so you can use it to see stuff during booting which you wouldn't see otherwise. In Windows it does nothing.

    I actually don't have a SysRq key on my keyboard, although I figure it's one of those three but labeled differently on my or perhabs all German keyboards.
  • Whizzo 29 Jun 2003 20:44:11 43,033 posts
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    Print Scrn and SysRq share the same key on an English keyboard Moonie.

    I've used "Scroll Lock" in the past with things like terminal emulators and other programmes back in the DOS days. In Windows it never seems to do anything other than be useful as a very low level light source!

    I vaguely remember some PC keyboards that use to have "Return" written on the key, a looooong time ago too, but mostly they have the "Carriage Return" symbol on them.

    This space left intentionally blank.

  • HitchHiker 29 Jun 2003 22:34:25 2,762 posts
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    Moonbender wrote:

    The right one ("Pause") also doesn't do a whole lot, although some games use it as a pause key. It also pauses output in the console, including right after the BIOS POST, so you can use it to see stuff during booting which you wouldn't see otherwise. In Windows it does nothing.


    The things you pick up on this forum ;-)

    Thats bloody brilliant, cheers Moonbender. Been wondering how to read all the stuff after the BIOS screen for weeks now. Was going to post on the Computing.net forums but now I have no need.

    I'm off to play now :-)

    HH.

    Edited by HitchHiker at 21:35:15 29-06-2003
  • FWB 30 Jun 2003 10:23:32 43,806 posts
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    Where'd the "ANY" key go?
  • Machiavel 30 Jun 2003 11:20:45 5,964 posts
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    Ah, but we have similarly shortened time descriptions to "Half past" or "Quarter to" which totally baffle our American friends. "Meet you at quarter to," rhymes and is succinct - and completely obscures the meaning of "Quarter to The Next Hour, i.e. 45 minutes past the preceding one."
  • Alastair 30 Jun 2003 13:41:49 15,431 posts
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    One that always had me confused during my time in Edinburgh was 'the back of' e.g. 'I'll see you around the back of 10.'

    Any of the Scottish inhabitants care to clear this up for me?

    Not as nice as I used to be

  • funk 1 Jul 2003 03:49:16 982 posts
    Registered 11 years ago
    i prefer having MM/DD/YY, but even better is YY/MM/DD, but i don't think anyone uses it
    this way dates are arranged properly, alphabetically

    around the back of 10 probably means after 10
  • Machiavel 1 Jul 2003 13:06:30 5,964 posts
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    Oh, and number formats. I like the classical British definition of a billion but respect the practicality of the American equivalent. Only, the American billion is not standard here in Europe, is it? And everytime someone (non-American, non-City) mentions a Billion, I have to ask for clarification. What's the hell is going on?
  • Machiavel 1 Jul 2003 13:15:17 5,964 posts
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    I like the sound of 'milliard'. How about banning these confused words altogether? I bet broadcasters would love saying "Today, the government announced tax revenue would be down one, oh oh oh, oh oh oh, oh Oh OH pounds sterling." It might also help the redistribution of wealth, as extremely rich people will only be able to earn so much money before getting really confused.
  • otto Moderator 28 May 2007 11:16:19 49,298 posts
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    Sardonicus wrote:
    Does anybody remember when the RETURN key became the ENTER key? You never see it anymore... where did it go?

    Plus when did people stop putting "th" after the date? Like when 17th of June became June 17. Just look on the BBC's website and you'll see even they've succumbed. I want my dates back!! Plus it doesn't really make sense when they say "And on March 3 dogs bit an old man." ..WTF?
    3 dogs bit a man in March or an unknown quantity on March the 3rd?

    Don't even get me started on missing out the word "ON" from "A dog bit a man Monday".
    What you're describing Sardonicus is the americanisation aka bastardisation of our precious and noble language.

    In English it has always been "a dog bit a man on the 3rd of March." Only Americans drop the preposition and fuck up the placement of the date. OK I'll let the 'rd'/'th'/'st' thing go, as long as you put the date before the month, but on no account should anyone living outside the United States forget to use the preposition with a date, or get the date and the month the wrong way round.

    The rule is, people, DD/MM/YY and don't you forget it!

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

  • otto Moderator 28 May 2007 11:16:19 49,298 posts
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    Yeah but "quarter to" is at least logical and specific. It means a quarter to something, and a quarter past means a quarter past something. Obviously.

    Now can someone tell me what the blinking f*ck a quarter "of" is supposed to mean??

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

  • otto Moderator 28 May 2007 11:16:19 49,298 posts
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    funk wrote:
    i prefer having MM/DD/YY, but even better is YY/MM/DD, but i don't think anyone uses it this way
    Hmm, I'll ignore the first bit of your comment which is just plain wrong, but as to the second bit, I use that system for all my save documents because it then defaults to chronological order.

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

  • otto Moderator 28 May 2007 11:16:19 49,298 posts
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    Yeah it's bollocks isn't it? Everyone should just stick to 'milliard' which is French for 1,000,000,000.

    Hang on, is that a trillion? Or a US billion? Or a UK billion?

    /runs away screaming

    say no to Eurogamer sigs

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