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  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 12:08:23 9,152 posts
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    It's all very well making a film that is a political metaphor but perhaps if that metaphor wasn't so shocking and disgusting more people would watch and understand what it was you were trying to say. A Serbian Film is abhorrent.
  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 12:09:51 9,152 posts
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    I suppose that's back into the old arguement of film as an art medium or purely as an entertainment medium. It's safe to say there are films in each camps with others straddling both.

    One could say "I didn't enjoy that film, it was shocking and disgusting". Another might say "I am shocked and disgusted but I understand the message and it has left a profound impact on me".

    Edited by wuntyphyve at 12:10:53 07-09-2017
  • OllyJ 7 Sep 2017 12:21:36 3,858 posts
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    @creepiest-lizard Yeah seen Martyrs, and Inside, both properly scary actually. Or at least Martyrs was traumatising and Inside was just insane.

    I guess, I haven't been mega creeped out in a while, I find stuff like Prisoners quite scary though.
  • OllyJ 7 Sep 2017 12:24:20 3,858 posts
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    Basically I'm hoping IT creeps me out, not up for a gore fest.
  • Humperfunk 7 Sep 2017 12:29:55 6,768 posts
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    Christ, just read the plot on Wikipedia for A Serbian Film, not for me thanks!
  • Dgzter 7 Sep 2017 12:32:28 1,440 posts
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    @OllyJ Yeah, absolutely. It's the psychological horror I'm interested in, and what carries the book imo. Gore does, of course, have a place in horror films, but unless it's handled well it tends to have a bit of a bathetic effect for me personally.
  • Tonka 7 Sep 2017 12:39:28 26,047 posts
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    I'm in the "No too keen on modern horror" camp too. Last horror film I saw and enjoyed was "Drag Me to Hell". I'm thinking about watching Get Out since that seems to be more in line with what I can handle.
  • You-can-call-me-kal 7 Sep 2017 12:44:06 9,345 posts
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    I'm not too sure what people mean by 'modern horror'. It's more varied as a genre now than it's ever been.

    There was a phase a few years ago when it was all getting into really nasty gorno torture porn territory, but it seems to have come out the other side, and you've got everything now from camp teen slasher types, to really quite high brow arthouse horror. And yeah, some really nasty shit as well if that's your thing.
  • UncleLou Moderator 7 Sep 2017 12:44:57 38,554 posts
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    Should I read IT again? I loved that book, in particular the small town atmosphere, but that was 30 years ago, when I was 15!

    Reread and destroy old teenage memories, or just watch the film?
  • Dgzter 7 Sep 2017 12:53:56 1,440 posts
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    UncleLou wrote:
    Should I read IT again? I loved that book, in particular the small town atmosphere, but that was 30 years ago, when I was 15!

    Reread and destroy old teenage memories, or just watch the film?
    Absolutely read it again. I first read it when I was also a teenager, but I've subsequently re-read a couple of times and it is still a wonderfully crafted story. Sure, as Wunty mentioned earlier, there may be elements that hit a less than favourable note with you when coming to it from an older perspective, but it's still great.

    And regardless of the sneering King often receives from within academic circles - and from literary critic giants such as Harold Bloom who continue to act like obnoxious cocks when assessing King's oeuvre - I'd still maintain that there are few other writers who can evoke such a powerful and wonderfully-realised sense of what it must have been like to grow up in 1950s small town America. Those sections of IT still read as well to me in my 30s as they did when I was a teenager.

    Edited by Dgzter at 12:54:43 07-09-2017
  • creepiest-lizard 7 Sep 2017 12:56:11 474 posts
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    You-can-call-me-kal wrote:
    I'm not too sure what people mean by 'modern horror'. It's more varied as a genre now than it's ever been.

    There was a phase a few years ago when it was all getting into really nasty gorno torture porn territory, but it seems to have come out the other side, and you've got everything now from camp teen slasher types, to really quite high brow arthouse horror. And yeah, some really nasty shit as well if that's your thing.
    you can come across as quite patronising sometimes
  • GarlVinland 7 Sep 2017 12:57:41 1,966 posts
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    creepiest-lizard wrote:
    @You-can-call-me-kal
    Without wanting to come across as mental, I actually like the film a lot.
    It really isn't just being horrible for horribleness sake at all. Without going into spoilers I think the main point of the film is the insanity people are capable of when it comes to religion. I'll say no more than that about it in case anyone wants to see it.
    This discussion probably isn't an advert though
    Would I need a sick bag to watch it? It keeps popping up on 'best of' horror lists so I feel like I should give it a shot, but if it's just disgusting I don't think I'll bother. My stomach for those sorts of films has gone with age.
  • creepiest-lizard 7 Sep 2017 12:58:07 474 posts
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    Dgzter wrote:
    UncleLou wrote:
    Should I read IT again? I loved that book, in particular the small town atmosphere, but that was 30 years ago, when I was 15!

    Reread and destroy old teenage memories, or just watch the film?
    Absolutely read it again. I first read it when I was also a teenager, but I've subsequently re-read a couple of times and it is still a wonderfully crafted story. Sure, as Wunty mentioned earlier, there may be elements that hit a less than favourable note with you when coming to it from an older perspective, but it's still great.

    And regardless of the sneering King often receives from within academic circles - and from literary critic giants such as Harold Bloom who continue to act like obnoxious cocks when assessing King's oeuvre - I'd still maintain that there are few other writers who can evoke such a powerful and wonderfully-realised sense of what it must have been like to grow up in 1950s small town America. Those sections of IT still read as well to me in my 30s as they did when I was a teenager.
    I completely agree. I wanted that childhood when I read the book. despite the weird horror
  • You-can-call-me-kal 7 Sep 2017 12:59:24 9,345 posts
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    creepiest-lizard wrote:
    You-can-call-me-kal wrote:
    I'm not too sure what people mean by 'modern horror'. It's more varied as a genre now than it's ever been.

    There was a phase a few years ago when it was all getting into really nasty gorno torture porn territory, but it seems to have come out the other side, and you've got everything now from camp teen slasher types, to really quite high brow arthouse horror. And yeah, some really nasty shit as well if that's your thing.
    you can come across as quite patronising sometimes
    :lol:
  • creepiest-lizard 7 Sep 2017 13:03:58 474 posts
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    I am looking forward to it though. Seeing it in the morning on my own.
    I'm hoping to be creeped out
  • beastmaster 7 Sep 2017 13:06:53 17,264 posts
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    I may wait till next week and do a double-bill with Mother!
  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 13:13:27 9,152 posts
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    UncleLou wrote:
    Should I read IT again? I loved that book, in particular the small town atmosphere, but that was 30 years ago, when I was 15!

    Reread and destroy old teenage memories, or just watch the film?
    I reread it just last year for the first time since... God knows. Yeah I would read it again if I were you. The bones of the book are still fantastic and it has aged incredibly well. The adults do come across as absolute plebs in a way I never noticed before however and the childhood sections are definitely the best apart from "that" scene. But on the whole it stands the test of time incredibly well.

    I'm liking that they set the new film in the 80s and I am curious to see if that makes the story resonate with me in the same way that presumably the 50s setting resonated with the adult readers reading the book back when it came out.
  • UncleLou Moderator 7 Sep 2017 13:16:16 38,554 posts
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    creepiest-lizard wrote:
    Dgzter wrote:
    UncleLou wrote:
    Should I read IT again? I loved that book, in particular the small town atmosphere, but that was 30 years ago, when I was 15!

    Reread and destroy old teenage memories, or just watch the film?
    Absolutely read it again. I first read it when I was also a teenager, but I've subsequently re-read a couple of times and it is still a wonderfully crafted story. Sure, as Wunty mentioned earlier, there may be elements that hit a less than favourable note with you when coming to it from an older perspective, but it's still great.

    And regardless of the sneering King often receives from within academic circles - and from literary critic giants such as Harold Bloom who continue to act like obnoxious cocks when assessing King's oeuvre - I'd still maintain that there are few other writers who can evoke such a powerful and wonderfully-realised sense of what it must have been like to grow up in 1950s small town America. Those sections of IT still read as well to me in my 30s as they did when I was a teenager.
    I completely agree. I wanted that childhood when I read the book. despite the weird horror
    Downloading the Kindle sample as I type this. :)

    And yeah, I completely agree, it's the smalltown atmosphere where King shines, absolutely. The horror is almost secondary.
  • Trowel 7 Sep 2017 13:33:16 21,501 posts
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    Hoping this leads to a little surge of high quality big screen King adaptations, rather than the made for TV crap we had in the 80s and 90s. The likes of The Stand and deserve better.

    Mind you, Gerald's Game is on Netflix soon, and after watching the trailer I have suspicions about the quality...
  • Dgzter 7 Sep 2017 13:41:35 1,440 posts
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    Trowel wrote:
    Hoping this leads to a little surge of high quality big screen King adaptations, rather than the made for TV crap we had in the 80s and 90s. The likes of The Stand and deserve better.

    Mind you, Gerald's Game is on Netflix soon, and after watching the trailer I have suspicions about the quality...
    Yeah, The Stand probably does deserve better, but again I suspect there would be issues in terms of its scope, length and extensive dramatis personae. I think the uncut version clocks in at some c.1.3k pages?

    Of course, some aggressive editing might help ameliorate that; however, I think it may well be better suited to a big-budget 12-part episodic format from the likes of Netflix/Amazon Prime. But that then presents it's own challenges in terms of momentum and pacing etc., which is exactly what we seen in that god-awful Gary Sinise version, of course :p Would love to see it tried again, but I appreciate it is likely a very difficult one.

    That being said, wasn't there plans for a recent film adaptation mooted a few years back?

    Edited by Dgzter at 13:46:19 07-09-2017
  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 14:19:46 9,152 posts
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    To be fair the book of the stand has horrific pacing. There's about 100 pages devoted to town meetings.
  • You-can-call-me-kal 7 Sep 2017 14:25:20 9,345 posts
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    Trowel wrote:
    Hoping this leads to a little surge of high quality big screen King adaptations, rather than the made for TV crap we had in the 80s and 90s. The likes of The Stand and deserve better.

    Mind you, Gerald's Game is on Netflix soon, and after watching the trailer I have suspicions about the quality...
    I feel like most of the 80/90s Steven King films are pretty solid to be honest. You’ve got things like The Shining and Misery which are world class, Dead Zone, Thinner, Christine, Cujo, Children of the Corn and Pet Sematary which are all pretty enjoyable, and then quality non-horror ones like Stand by Me, Shawshank Redemption and Running Man which are all ace. There’s some real turds as well, fair enough, but most of his best work got pretty solid adaptations.
  • sport 7 Sep 2017 14:57:27 13,927 posts
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    Tommyknockers or GTFO!
  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 15:03:35 9,152 posts
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    I could do with reading Pet Sematary again come to mention it.
  • Scimarad 7 Sep 2017 15:07:53 9,205 posts
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    I'd love another adaptation of The Tommyknockers but I doubt I'd ever get it because even the book isn't that popular due to him being totally off his head when he wrote it. I still say it's pretty decent story, though.

    I just re-read Christine after avoiding doing so for years because I didn't think it would live up to my memories of it and it was even better than I remembered. I think it's a pretty good double feature with It although one is about kids in the 50s and the other is about teenagers in the 70s.
  • beastmaster 7 Sep 2017 15:09:46 17,264 posts
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    Salem's Lot scared the shit out of me when I were a lad.
  • ubergine 7 Sep 2017 15:41:08 7,349 posts
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    I skipped 200 pages of The Tommyknockers. The whole section where Jimmy Smits is making his way to where the actual fucking story happens.

    King is like so many other writers who meet great success - their editors wilt and they just bang on and on as if everything they say has merit. Just look at the last two Song Of Ice And Fire books, rambling garbage mostly.

    After reading some Peter Straub I was never able to go back to King. There's a reason his stuff appeals to teen readers. It's basic. He gets some good saleable images (killer clown, killer dog, killer magic girl) and throws in an underage orgy and you remember it your whole life like it's high art. King is basically the greatest ever hack. Not some hack hack, the best hack.
  • You-can-call-me-kal 7 Sep 2017 15:46:10 9,345 posts
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    ubergine wrote:
    I skipped 200 pages of The Tommyknockers. The whole section where Jimmy Smits is making his way to where the actual fucking story happens.

    King is like so many other writers who meet great success - their editors wilt and they just bang on and on as if everything they say has merit. Just look at the last two Song Of Ice And Fire books, rambling garbage mostly.

    After reading some Peter Straub I was never able to go back to King. There's a reason his stuff appeals to teen readers. It's basic. He gets some good saleable images (killer clown, killer dog, killer magic girl) and throws in an underage orgy and you remember it your whole life like it's high art. King is basically the greatest ever hack. Not some hack hack, the best hack.
    King's really highly rated amongst novelists. I think because his work is so accessible it's a little underrated from a literary point of view, but there's certain things he does with effortless brilliance (character development, dialogue etc) and it's not to be sneered at. He does have some fairly major shortcomings though as have been well documented in these various discussions (endings).
  • mumtoucher 7 Sep 2017 15:56:04 478 posts
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    I read Salem's lot recently due to wanting to learn about Callahan after ploughing through the Dark Tower..

    King is such a great read, I love how he is so gentle and then suddenly things can get really nasty and evil very quickly.

    Never read It though, I suspect I will after seeing the film on Friday.
  • wuntyphyve 7 Sep 2017 15:57:23 9,152 posts
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    I actually think that because one of King's major weaknesses are his novels endings, his short stories are nearly unassailable. The whole of Night Shift for example - it's full of utterly superb short stories, a lot of which were adapted into film. All his strengths and none of his weaknesses (pacing, structure, ending) because of the format. One For The Road is more chilling than the whole of Salem's Lot.
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