Original sci-fi IP

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  • LeoliansBro 15 Jan 2013 12:22:40 44,506 posts
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    It's an industry wide problem, but most acute in sci fi and fantasy: everything's a remake, a reboot, a sequel, or a spinoff. Thought a thread that lets me know when something new is on the horizon would be good.

    That giant mecha godzilla 'jaeger' thing looks good, if derivative, for starters.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • kalel 15 Jan 2013 12:27:25 88,408 posts
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    Duncan Jones is one to watch. He's got a few irons in the fire including a "Future City" type film in the ilk of Bladerunner, and something called "Mute" which is set in the same universe as Moon.
  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 12:30:47 7,372 posts
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    Few things coming out this year, off the top of my head...

    All You Need Is Kill.

    After Earth



    And Neil Blomkamp (District 9) has Elysium.



    And Chris Nolan's next movie might be a SF story about parallel universes and wormholes, or something.

    Edited by PearOfAnguish at 12:32:28 15-01-2013
  • sport 15 Jan 2013 12:31:05 12,775 posts
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    kalel wrote:
    and something called "Mute" which is set in the same universe as Moon.
    So it's a spinoff ;-P
  • LeoliansBro 15 Jan 2013 12:33:23 44,506 posts
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    See, that Elysium film thing is exactly the kind of SG1 thing that wastes sci-fi.

    Bring on Zowie though, Moon was stark and wonderful

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • nickthegun 15 Jan 2013 12:37:37 60,442 posts
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    Elysium, weirdly, has a broadly similar plot to battle angel alita.

    Still District 9 was great, so hopefully he will pass the difficult second album test.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
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  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 12:39:05 7,372 posts
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    LeoliansBro wrote:
    See, that Elysium film thing is exactly the kind of SG1 thing that wastes sci-fi.
    What? You're talking nonsense.
  • LeoliansBro 15 Jan 2013 12:40:56 44,506 posts
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    Why does the future have to be all about war, US style?

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 12:44:46 7,372 posts
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    So giant robots fighting godzilla monsters are okay, but you have a problem with a movie about a guy trying to escape a fucked-up planet Earth and get to the space station where all the rich people live in luxury? Does that even count as 'war'?

    You asked for original SF IP. You're getting told about some. Blomkomp did District 9 which I think allows us to be somewhat optimistic about Elysium.

    There are plenty of other movies coming out which don't involve war. Carruth's (Primer) Upstream Color, for example.
  • SClaw 15 Jan 2013 12:48:23 826 posts
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    Upstream Color looks unbelievably wank.

    It's either going to be the best year for sci-fi ever, or the worst. The films coming out so far could go either way. I'm slightly worried that Cruise will wreck two pretty decent sounding films with his short arse presence alone... but I'll give him a chance.
  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 12:56:36 7,372 posts
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    All we've seen of it so far are some vague trailers and a plot synopsis. But yes I'm sure it's a massive pile of shit. Like Primer!

    Cruise looks utterly ridiculous in All You Need Is Kill:



    That story definitely needed trimming of its Japanese excesses (the cliche clumsy female mechanic for instance, terrible) but when reading the book the description of its Starship Troopers-style power armour did not make me think of a dwarf strapped into some cheap scrap metal. Shame.

    I actually quite like Cruise in the right role but they need to stop putting him in everything. Jack Reacher for instance. The character was supposed to be a 6ft-something brute.
  • Gambit1977 15 Jan 2013 12:58:18 10,166 posts
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    Gravity sounds great and is getting good early word.
  • MetalDog 15 Jan 2013 13:04:01 23,727 posts
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    I'd definitely like to see more sci-fi games that aren't battle-oriented. So much potential for other stuff, so often ignored.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • bad09 15 Jan 2013 13:10:17 6,005 posts
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    I think others have already covered most that hit the criteria but a couple I can think of:

    Robot and Frank looks like a fun movie. Not spaceships and aliens but still sci-fi and certainly different.

    Pacific Rim looks like a jolly good monsters from another dimension vs giant robots romp. Outside of Transformers we've not had giant robots for a while.

    Edited by bad09 at 13:11:42 15-01-2013
  • SClaw 15 Jan 2013 13:14:10 826 posts
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    The Pacfic Rim trailer is complete shit though; it looks like Bay's Transformers.

    But Del Torro never usually goes too far wrong. I think of his films that I've seen, only Hellboy 2 was somewhat iffy (still a lot of fun, but not as much as the first).
  • Oh-Bollox 15 Jan 2013 13:17:44 5,326 posts
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    Another Earth? That was new IP.

    I won't be going to see Oblivion as A) Tom Cruise and B) Twist given away in the trailer.
  • bad09 15 Jan 2013 13:21:21 6,005 posts
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    @SClaw

    I thought it looked quite cool myself but then ever since Robot Jox I love big stompy robots and I like Del Torro so have faith.

    I agree it wasn't was good as 1 but Hellboy 2 is a great laugh.
  • ram 15 Jan 2013 13:24:46 3,483 posts
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    PearOfAnguish wrote:
    All we've seen of it so far are some vague trailers and a plot synopsis. But yes I'm sure it's a massive pile of shit. Like Primer!
    I can't tell if you are being ironic or something but do you mean Primer the time-travelling indie mindfuck classic?
  • smoothpete 15 Jan 2013 13:30:38 31,574 posts
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    Has anyone read Only Forward? I would love someone to make a movie of that - or better than that, make a game set in the City.
  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 13:34:53 7,372 posts
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    ram wrote:
    PearOfAnguish wrote:
    All we've seen of it so far are some vague trailers and a plot synopsis. But yes I'm sure it's a massive pile of shit. Like Primer!
    I can't tell if you are being ironic or something but do you mean Primer the time-travelling indie mindfuck classic?
    Yes, Primer the amazing indie flick about the time travel box.
  • Cappy 15 Jan 2013 13:37:08 12,024 posts
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    More and more, I find myself exploring 1960s and 1970s films, the 70s in particular were a golden age of sorts.

    Portrayal of dystopian future societies was a recurring theme in films such as Soylent Green, Zardoz and Logan's Run, with a lot of these films it takes a particular mindset to appreciate them.

    I'm particularly interested in the zeitgeist that inspired them, growing concern over environmental issues plus the ongoing cold war, made the very Earth rejecting us a tangible possibility. The taste for dystopia perhaps reflects growing acceptance that we are not chosen by a god and our tenure as masters of the Earth isn't a certainty.

    Extend into the 80s and the political slant becomes more pronounced reflecting fears of a drift towards the right in politics, Escape From New York and the Running Man show an Orwellian future where democracy gives way to totalitarian regimes or revisits the idea of corporations dwarfing the power of Government, visited in the 70s via Rollerball, then in the 80s in films like the Running Man, Alien, Blade Runner and Robo Cop.

    It's an unending source of frustration to me that I'm too close to step back and see what is rattling our cages here in the present day. I find it hard to appreciate much of anything released nowadays, the love for special effects and slick, choreographed fights make anything of substance harder to see, if it's there at all.

    Edited by Cappy at 13:38:37 15-01-2013
  • kickerconspiracy 15 Jan 2013 13:40:05 494 posts
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    @PearOfAnguish

    For some reason I read "Shemale" on that gun.
  • kalel 15 Jan 2013 13:44:35 88,408 posts
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    Cappy wrote:
    More and more, I find myself exploring 1960s and 1970s films, the 70s in particular were a golden age of sorts.

    Portrayal of dystopian future societies was a recurring theme in films such as Soylent Green, Zardoz and Logan's Run, with a lot of these films it takes a particular mindset to appreciate them.

    I'm particularly interested in the zeitgeist that inspired them, growing concern over environmental issues plus the ongoing cold war, made the very Earth rejecting us a tangible possibility. The taste for dystopia perhaps reflects growing acceptance that we are not chosen by a god and our tenure as masters of the Earth isn't a certainty.

    Extend into the 80s and the political slant becomes more pronounced reflecting fears of a drift towards the right in politics, Escape From New York and the Running Man show an Orwellian future where democracy gives way to totalitarian regimes or revisits the idea of corporations dwarfing the power of Government, visited in the 70s via Rollerball, then in the 80s in films like the Running Man, Alien, Blade Runner and Robo Cop.

    It's an unending source of frustration to me that I'm too close to step back and see what is rattling our cages here in the present day. I find it hard to appreciate much of anything released nowadays, the love for special effects and slick, choreographed fights make anything of substance harder to see, if it's there at all.
    What an interesting post.

    I think for a while sci-fi regressed back to B-Movie stuff like Independence day and Armageddon, and I think that's all really blatantly about American protectionism and foreign policy.

    In more subtle ways that's also probably what things like Moon are about as well. How far are we prepared to go to preserve our way of life etc.
  • PearOfAnguish 15 Jan 2013 13:50:13 7,372 posts
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    kickerconspiracy wrote:
    @PearOfAnguish

    For some reason I read "Shemale" on that gun.
    That would be a very different movie.
  • disusedgenius 15 Jan 2013 14:13:57 5,419 posts
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    Alfonso Cuarón has Gravity on the way. I think it's a adaptation of a book, but is apparently a pretty lose one.
  • SClaw 15 Jan 2013 14:45:32 826 posts
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    Cappy wrote:
    More and more, I find myself exploring 1960s and 1970s films, the 70s in particular were a golden age of sorts.

    Portrayal of dystopian future societies was a recurring theme in films such as Soylent Green, Zardoz and Logan's Run, with a lot of these films it takes a particular mindset to appreciate them.

    I'm particularly interested in the zeitgeist that inspired them, growing concern over environmental issues plus the ongoing cold war, made the very Earth rejecting us a tangible possibility. The taste for dystopia perhaps reflects growing acceptance that we are not chosen by a god and our tenure as masters of the Earth isn't a certainty.

    Extend into the 80s and the political slant becomes more pronounced reflecting fears of a drift towards the right in politics, Escape From New York and the Running Man show an Orwellian future where democracy gives way to totalitarian regimes or revisits the idea of corporations dwarfing the power of Government, visited in the 70s via Rollerball, then in the 80s in films like the Running Man, Alien, Blade Runner and Robo Cop.

    It's an unending source of frustration to me that I'm too close to step back and see what is rattling our cages here in the present day. I find it hard to appreciate much of anything released nowadays, the love for special effects and slick, choreographed fights make anything of substance harder to see, if it's there at all.
    That was a good post.

    The problem is – as I see it – that there are few really good contemporary sci-fi writers left these days. You have some who are writing the same books they were writing years ago (Peter Hamilton, for example) which are fine but hardly reflect the angsts of our modern society, and then you have everyone else… who are all writing zombie and vampire shit because it sells.

    However there are some great foreign sci-fi books knocking around; All You Need Is Kill is one example but Mardock Scramble is just about the best sci-fi book I’ve ever read (which is being somewhat clumsily translated into a pretty good series of anime films), next to Yukikaze (which is brilliant; the second one loses a little magic and mystery but the setting is fantastic and the themes are very contemporary).

    The problem is… none of those books would make good western films. I think you need a certain mindset and understanding to read a Japanese sci-fi book, something which would be stripped away by strapping Tom Cruise into the lead role (probably… sigh). It’s likely also true of other countries books (Metro 2033 is another fine example, as is Roadside Picnic [which Stalker is based on] – piss poor translations don’t help much either).

    In summary… as I’ve forgotten my point… I think most of our modern writers want to be penning the next Twilight or penning kiddy shit like Doctor Who rather than exploring modern angst through the medium of thoughtful sci-fi.
  • LeoliansBro 15 Jan 2013 14:52:59 44,506 posts
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    The best sci-fi novel is Dune. Let's put this one to bed straight away.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • kalel 15 Jan 2013 14:58:14 88,408 posts
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    It's a bit of a wanky distinction to make, but I've always considered Dune to be "future fantasy" as opposed to sci-fi.
  • LeoliansBro 15 Jan 2013 15:00:17 44,506 posts
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    No that's fair.

    Still the best though :p

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • disusedgenius 15 Jan 2013 15:03:10 5,419 posts
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    Pfft. It's not even the best future fantasy and, to make matters worse, makes only for passable toilet paper.
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