Friday's science question for spindizzy

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  • LeoliansBro 11 Jan 2013 09:50:12 43,825 posts
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    So, here's what I was wondering today.

    1. If you have a planet, it has a gravitational field around it. If you have a planet made of antimatter, does it have a gravitational field around it as well? Or does it have an 'antigravity' field around it?

    2. If you have a planet and annihilate it with an antimatter planet, all that remains is energy. Does the gravitational effect of the planet immediately disappear? Or does it 'linger' with the effect propagating at (say) lightspeed?

    3. If the removal of a planet means instantaneous removal of its gravitational pull, does this suggest gravity fluctuations can circumvent lightspeed and be used as a form of instantaneous communication (similar to quantum entanglement)?

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • smoothpete 11 Jan 2013 10:04:16 31,501 posts
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    Reverse the polarity.
  • sport 11 Jan 2013 10:06:56 12,697 posts
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    Honestly, you don't need to wash it - a rinse is fine!
  • LeoliansBro 11 Jan 2013 10:08:33 43,825 posts
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    Right, I've figured out the first one. (In theory) antimatter also has an attractive gravitational field.

    Makes the second and third questions more pointed.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Chopsen 11 Jan 2013 10:11:26 15,885 posts
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    http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2010/08/25/what-is-the-speed-of-gravity/
  • sport 11 Jan 2013 10:14:58 12,697 posts
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    spindizzy at his office right now
  • LeoliansBro 11 Jan 2013 10:17:11 43,825 posts
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    Chopsen you are once again amazingly helpful, You're like the ghost Ben Kenobi of the forum. Thanks!

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • warlockuk 11 Jan 2013 10:19:11 19,151 posts
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    Gravity won't just stop having an effect but if the source is gone the effect will peter out as overriding forces take over.

    Sorry for the link, but you want this

    I'm a grumpy bastard.

  • LeoliansBro 11 Jan 2013 10:19:19 43,825 posts
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    Hmmm. So, gravity is a force at a distance. That moves at the speed of light. That has no mass.

    Doesn't that make gravity the same as light?

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Deckard1 11 Jan 2013 10:19:30 27,770 posts
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    Chopsen wrote:
    http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2010/08/25/what-is-the-speed-of-gravity/
    I wish I was clever enough to have a job figuring all that shit out. Its got to be the most interesting job in the world.

    Hush you ponce

  • JuanKerr 11 Jan 2013 10:25:25 36,241 posts
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    You wouldn't have as much time to post on here though.
  • Shikasama 11 Jan 2013 10:29:05 6,759 posts
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    Deckard1 wrote:
    Chopsen wrote:
    http://scienceblogs.com/startswithabang/2010/08/25/what-is-the-speed-of-gravity/
    I wish I was clever enough to have a job figuring all that shit out. Its got to be the most interesting job in the world.
    Probably only an interesting job if you really like physics.

    If you really hated physics you'd probably not be that interested.
  • Deckard1 11 Jan 2013 10:31:46 27,770 posts
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    Thanks for that insight.

    Hush you ponce

  • Bremenacht 11 Jan 2013 10:35:35 17,852 posts
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    LeoliansBro wrote:
    Hmmm. So, gravity is a force at a distance. That moves at the speed of light. That has no mass.

    Doesn't that make gravity the same as light?
    They think the force of gravity is carried by gravitons, which would have no charge and probably no energy, so quite different to light. Anyway - one for Spindizzy.
  • Shikasama 11 Jan 2013 10:35:48 6,759 posts
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    You're welcome
  • LeoliansBro 11 Jan 2013 10:37:19 43,825 posts
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    Bremenacht wrote:
    LeoliansBro wrote:
    Hmmm. So, gravity is a force at a distance. That moves at the speed of light. That has no mass.

    Doesn't that make gravity the same as light?
    They think the force of gravity is carried by gravitons, which would have no charge and probably no energy, so quite different to light. Anyway - one for Spindizzy.
    Ah! Thanks.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • MightyMetalMonkey 11 Jan 2013 10:39:22 600 posts
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    smoothpete wrote:
    Reverse the polarity.
    of the neutron flow ? Or the jelly baby ?
  • S.J.Rogers 11 Jan 2013 10:43:33 3,557 posts
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    My cat’s breath smells like cat food…
  • DaM 11 Jan 2013 10:45:39 12,996 posts
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    Spindizzy's busy tightening the screws on the LHC at the moment.
  • Mr-Brett 11 Jan 2013 10:54:37 12,777 posts
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    DaM wrote:
    Spindizzy's busy fighting the combine at the moment.

    Portable view - Never forget.

  • Lukus 11 Jan 2013 10:59:10 19,050 posts
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    Lbro is still high, isn't he.

    Paintings & Photographs

  • neilka 11 Jan 2013 11:49:34 15,861 posts
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    He's essentially Fruit in alligator skin wingtips

    A map is like comparing velocity and speed.

  • grey_matters 11 Jan 2013 12:02:55 3,691 posts
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    :D
  • LeoliansBro 1 Feb 2013 11:00:02 43,825 posts
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    Hi, a follow up question.

    We know that everything exists as both a particle and a wave right, defined by the following equation:

    k = h/(mv)

    Where 'k' is the wavelength, 'h' is Planck's constant, 'm' is mass and 'v' is velocity.

    It's the 'mv' bit I'm interested in. Light moves at lightspeed ('c') and has no mass (m=0).

    How can we then define the wavelength of light, as we are dividing by zero?

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Fake_Blood 1 Feb 2013 11:06:47 4,171 posts
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    Because m is not equal to zero and v is the speed of light which is a huge number.
  • senso-ji 1 Feb 2013 11:09:15 5,855 posts
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    Einstein's E=M(C)Sq tells us that the momentum (energy) of something must have a mass. Light particles (Photons) have zero mass when stationary, but will have a mass when moving as they're generating energy. So you just divide the speed of light by the energy they create to get their current mass.
  • MrTomFTW Moderator 1 Feb 2013 11:09:38 37,886 posts
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    Light does have some mass, it's just a tiiiiiiiiiiiiny little number.

    Edit: or wot dey sed

    Edited by MrTomFTW at 11:10:32 01-02-2013

    Follow me on Twitter: @MrTom
    Voted by the community "Best mod" 2011, 2012 and 2013.

  • LeoliansBro 1 Feb 2013 11:11:31 43,825 posts
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    Light has no mass. Promise you that is true.

    Edit: I should clairfy, I mean they have no mass in and of themselves (which is the 'm' in that equation).

    Also, as an aside, two things:

    1) When is light ever stationary?

    2) mv=c for light. But we're all moving at speed c in 4th dimensional spacetime. So does mv=c universally?

    Edited by LeoliansBro at 11:16:26 01-02-2013

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Salaman 1 Feb 2013 11:15:27 18,959 posts
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    You're a banker though, what do you know about complicated physics.
  • LeoliansBro 1 Feb 2013 11:18:03 43,825 posts
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    Less than spindizzy, which is why I made this thread :)

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

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