Anyone speak Spanish?

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  • Deleted user 3 November 2012 23:25:50
    'Cause I'm learning it at the moment, and direct object pronouns are absolutely kicking my arse. Every time I think I've got a handle on it, I find out I actually haven't, and the sentence I just wrote with los is actually lo, and the verb isn't conjugated the way I expect it, and overall I'm just staring at the material we've got for it to the point where I'm not sure they're actually written words anymore, but strange markings unidentifiable by the human mind.

    Have google searched for more tutorials, but they're equally as confusing. Chances are I probably just need to step back for a day and then start anew, but someone somewhere might have some tips or pointers to clarify.
  • Lexx87 3 Nov 2012 23:32:42 20,869 posts
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    Hola

    Speak the truth hussy!

  • Fatiguez 3 Nov 2012 23:36:23 8,655 posts
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    You can use a lowercase 'i' instead of that freaky upside-down exclamation mark, to save a bit of time if you don't want to learn the unicode for it. It looks pretty much the same.
  • Toonster 3 Nov 2012 23:39:46 6,821 posts
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    ¿Donde esta la biblioteca? ¿Es en la mesa? ¡Si! ¿Cuanto es la piña?

    3DS: 0361-6951-2609 (Tom)

  • elstoof 3 Nov 2012 23:41:44 6,138 posts
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    Tried the Michel Thomas method?
  • DaM 3 Nov 2012 23:42:51 12,606 posts
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    Nein.
  • Deleted user 3 November 2012 23:43:46
    Tip for Gremmi: would help if you gave an example of what a direct objective pronoun is, (you seem to presume everyone would know).

    I'm learning French right now and have no idea what a DOP is.
  • Deleted user 3 November 2012 23:46:10
    elstoof wrote:
    Tried the Michel Thomas method?
    \o/ Pimsleur and Michel Thomas are both pretty good. That and watching loads of telly, + French (in my case) films with subs.
  • Lexx87 3 Nov 2012 23:47:35 20,869 posts
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    meme just move to Mexico for 6 months.

    Speak the truth hussy!

  • Fatiguez 3 Nov 2012 23:51:02 8,655 posts
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    Have you asked your gardener for help
  • Deleted user 4 November 2012 00:02:03
    Un pocito, pero me gustaria llamar ustede un burro.

    Jejejejejeje.
  • Deleted user 4 November 2012 03:22:38
    Greggywocky... wrote:
    Tip for Gremmi: would help if you gave an example of what a direct objective pronoun is, (you seem to presume everyone would know).

    I'm learning French right now and have no idea what a DOP is.
    Direct Object Pronoun = a pronoun (me, you, him, her, it, etc) referencing a direct object (a thing that receives the action of a sentence).

    The problem I'm finding is that it's ridiculously hard to keep track of what the pronoun replaces - it's easy enough in just straightforward one-shot question/answer situations (IE "who's ball is that?" "it's his" ), but when it comes to more complex conversations I have difficulty actually conjugating the pronoun and verb for the missing object. Doubly so because Spanish conjugation includes gender as well as number and perspective.

    So something like:

    "I need to clean my house"
    "Do you? I could help."
    "Would you help? If you help I'll cook dinner."
    "That would be great if you did, I'll definitely help."

    becomes...well, anyone's guess, really.

    Really just wondered if anyone who learnt Spanish had any odd little tricks or something to help.

    Edited by meme at 03:22:58 04-11-2012
  • Deleted user 4 November 2012 06:58:25
    Yo no hablaba nada de Inglés.
  • angeltreats 4 Nov 2012 11:29:43 2,602 posts
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    meme wrote:

    Direct Object Pronoun = a pronoun (me, you, him, her, it, etc) referencing a direct object (a thing that receives the action of a sentence).

    The problem I'm finding is that it's ridiculously hard to keep track of what the pronoun replaces - it's easy enough in just straightforward one-shot question/answer situations (IE "who's ball is that?" "it's his" ), but when it comes to more complex conversations I have difficulty actually conjugating the pronoun and verb for the missing object. Doubly so because Spanish conjugation includes gender as well as number and perspective.

    I speak Spanish (not native, but half-decent - halfway through a degree before I had to drop out due to moving away, used to work there, did an A level recently for fun etc) and I have no idea what any of the above means. Although I "acquired" most of my Spanish by working there and having Spanish friends, I never paid much attention when we learned grammar at school.

    Did a quick google and found this, any use?
  • MrTomFTW Moderator 4 Nov 2012 12:35:09 36,275 posts
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    I'm ready for someone who is fluent to correct me here but...

    My Spanish has lapsed greatly to the point where I can't hold a conversation (and even then I was more focused on Mexican Spanish), but yeah it's a total mess. I never really found any way to tell for sure. It all depends on whether the person or object you're speaking about is male or female, and the status of the thing is permanent or temporary. Even then there's inconsistencies. For example if you're asking where a shop is you would ask "where is?" "Donde es?" with "es" being the permanent version of is. Even though the shop isn't always going to be there.

    But if you're talking about someone being dead you'd say "...is dead" "esta muerte" esta being the temporary form of is. Like they're only temporarily dead.

    It only came through experience for me. Although I think I may be off topic of what you're really asking.

    Edited by MrTomFTW at 12:36:03 04-11-2012

    I totally called it.
    Follow me on Twitter: @MrTom
    Voted by the community "Best mod" 2011, 2012 and 2013.

  • jonsaan 4 Nov 2012 12:50:48 25,248 posts
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    Fatiguez wrote:
    Have you asked your gardener for help
    :D

    FCUTA!

  • Lamb 4 Nov 2012 14:02:00 467 posts
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    This is what foreign languages do to me. :p :D

    Short Circuit II - Los Locos Kick Your Balls into Outer Space



    No se. :(

    Edited by Lamb at 14:05:29 04-11-2012
  • Deleted user 4 November 2012 15:23:39
    Yeah, ser and estar are the states and traits. I've got a grasp on that pretty well - the direct object thing is dropping parts of known objects, so instead of

    "do you speak to your grandparents?"
    "Yes, I speak to my grandparents"

    it's

    "do you call your grandparents?"
    "Yes, I call them".

    In that last instance it's easy, because grandparents is a masculine plural, so instead of "si, yo llamo mis abuelos" it's "si, yo los llamo". But my issue comes when it's more complex, and the rules for conjugation of the pronouns and verbs seems to just go random.

    ...actually, I think just typing this out has helped me a bit. I'll just write out the full extended sentences and then contract that down to pronouns, rather than trying to work out the pronoun conjugation in my head.

    @AT - I went over that tutorial before but it didn't help me a great deal. But thanks for looking. Interesting that Spanish speakers don't seem to know what it is, though. Maybe my course is weird. Or maybe it's one of those things where you usually just learn how to do it without knowing the grammatical terms for it.

    Edited by meme at 15:27:10 04-11-2012
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