Getting a dog

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  • sirtacos 29 Sep 2012 04:33:15 7,336 posts
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    I'm going to get a dog in a few months. Need advice.

    I'm considering the following breeds (I'm down for a mix as well):
    Rottweiler, Akita, Schipperke, Staffordshire bull terrier, Blue lacy, Carlin pinscher.

    Since I'm opting for a rescue, a rottweiler or staffie mix is probably my best bet.

    The gf wants a puppy. Being in possession of a soul, I love puppies too, but I'm also considering a full-grown dog.

    A puppy is a lot of work. A puppy stays a puppy for a long time. A puppy is adorable, and the idea of having a dog for its entire life cycle is appealing.
    However, a full-grown dog already has an established personality, and as such, it is easier to select for compatibility.

    Either way, I plan on taking as many obedience/training classes as necessary. I'm even thinking of eventually training him/her to be a therapy dog.

    So.. dog? Or puppy?

    Are the breeds I've cited good choices? My ideal dog does not bark much, is intelligent, loyal and trustworthy. A lot of exercise will be provided, but we will be living in a flat, so there's that. Also we will adopt a kitten roughly at the same time, so no kitty murdering is preferable.
  • sirtacos 29 Sep 2012 04:40:43 7,336 posts
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    The more I think about it, the more I lean towards an adult.

    I'd get to feel good about myself as a bonus - it's harder to re-home adults, especially those with a troubled background (i.e. cunt owners), whereas puppies usually have no trouble finding a home.
  • PenguinJim 29 Sep 2012 05:02:57 5,921 posts
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    Considered a ferret?
  • sirtacos 29 Sep 2012 05:06:26 7,336 posts
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    I'm afraid I'd be too tempted to use it as a colon snake. With the help of carefully placed treats.
  • spindle9988 29 Sep 2012 08:51:31 3,629 posts
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    Get a puppy. You can train it how you want then. I rescued a 3 year old from a home a few years ago. He was a great dog but really hard to get him to shake old habits
  • ElNuevo9 29 Sep 2012 09:01:16 13,493 posts
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    Yeah, you don't know what you're getting with a rescue dog in truth - literally anything could've happened to it that will shape it's behavior forever. Getting a puppy is initially hard work, it really is. But, with the right trainimg and attention you can have a much, much greater input as to how you dog will behave.

    Nothing but respect for people that take in rescue dogs, though.

    Hated, adored, never ignored.

  • Deleted user 29 September 2012 09:04:44
    Get a puppy. You develop a much closer bond to a dog if you get them at a young age. Also: They're cute.
  • spindle9988 29 Sep 2012 09:05:55 3,629 posts
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    My dog i rescued would never go out in the rain, which lead me to think a previous owner had just left him outside night and day. (God I miss that dog) sniff
  • nickthegun 29 Sep 2012 09:11:31 60,617 posts
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    Is there any particular reason that you have narrowed your favoured breeds down to ones that are usually owned by people in shell suits?

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • ElNuevo9 29 Sep 2012 09:16:18 13,493 posts
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    nickthegun wrote:
    Is there any particular reason that you have narrowed your favoured breeds down to ones that are usually owned by people in shell suits?
    :D

    Hated, adored, never ignored.

  • lucky_jim 29 Sep 2012 09:18:26 5,327 posts
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    @nickthegun
    If I was getting a dog from a rescue centre I'd seriously consider staffies and the like, not because I'd want an intimidating dog, but because they're among the most likely to end up in rescue centres in the UK, and among the hardest to re-home. Not sure what the OPs logic is, but there's no need to be a dog-snob! :-P
  • JuanKerr 29 Sep 2012 09:18:53 36,375 posts
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    Staffies are great dogs - don't let preconceptions of the breed by people who don't know what they're talking about put you off.

    We rescued a staffie cross and she's brilliant. I trust her with people more than any other dog. Puppies are incredibly hard work, and can be frustrating. You need to be patient and very disciplined.
  • elstoof 29 Sep 2012 09:22:15 7,811 posts
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    sirtacos wrote:
    those with a troubled background (i.e. cunt owners)

    sirtacos wrote:
    Rottweiler

    sirtacos wrote:
    Kitten
  • JuanKerr 29 Sep 2012 09:23:09 36,375 posts
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    And kudos for wanting to rescue one of those breeds - they have a hard time and it's a shame that their reputation has been tainted by scum. Even more of a shame is that intelligent people are seemingly so fucking ignorant and spew their ill-informed shit about the breed, especially with regards to staffies.
  • nickthegun 29 Sep 2012 09:23:14 60,617 posts
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    lucky_jim wrote:
    Not sure what the OPs logic is, but there's no need to be a dog-snob! :-P
    Lets be honest, that list is 100% ratboy. Its not like it was a list interspersed with collies or the gay dogs deckard has.

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • tincanrocket 29 Sep 2012 09:23:24 3,025 posts
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    Post deleted
  • RobAnybody 29 Sep 2012 09:27:39 930 posts
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    nickthegun wrote:
    Is there any particular reason that you have narrowed your favoured breeds down to ones that are usually owned by people in shell suits?
    I was just thinking the same thing. ;) ;)

    As you're living in a flat, maybe a smaller 'Heinz 57' mix? Remember that it needs a good amount of exercise.

    As for the initial question - I would avoid an adult dog unless you're really experienced with dogs, solely due to the issues mentioned above. A puppy is very hard work but rewarding as they grow up, mature and you all bond. As you're also getting a kitten, you really should be getting a pup - introducing a kitten to a fully grown dog with an unknown history could be very problematic! But if you get a puppy AND a kitten on the same day and let them grow up together then all should be well (remember that pups chew and bite a LOT due to teething!).

    Also remember the vets bills, which can mount up due to ill health.

    And if you're getting a pup and decide to get one from a breeder, do check out the breeder thoroughly. The same applies if getting a rescue pup.

    Edited by RobAnybody at 09:31:36 29-09-2012
  • elstoof 29 Sep 2012 09:28:50 7,811 posts
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    Staffies are awesome, one of the happiest, funnest breed of dog you could hope to have. It's just a real shame they're usually attached to some cunt with their fringe gelled down over their forehead and an earring.
  • Fake_Blood 29 Sep 2012 09:30:55 4,314 posts
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    Kinda depends if this dog is going to be around children a lot or not.
    If not, by all means, get a second hand rottweiler.
  • JuanKerr 29 Sep 2012 09:32:34 36,375 posts
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    Wondered how long it would take for this thread to go all daily mail.
  • elstoof 29 Sep 2012 09:34:39 7,811 posts
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    Any dog is a nice dog, not just the ones they have on Blue Peter.
  • nickthegun 29 Sep 2012 09:40:42 60,617 posts
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    JuanKerr wrote:
    Wondered how long it would take for this thread to go all daily mail.
    Imagine how annoyed you would be if staffies were ginger

    ---------------------------------------------------------
    My man gives real loving that's why I call him Killer
    He's not a wham-bam-thank-you-ma'am, he's a thriller

  • Deleted user 29 September 2012 10:31:25
    We're getting a dog at the start of November :)
    Last dog was a rescue dog but there are certain habits we just outright have not been able to break so getting a puppy this time. Good training for a baby apparently! I wanted a St Bernard or husky, missus wanted a little lap dog, we settled on "the gay dog Deckard1 has"
    Can't bloody wait.
  • dominalien 29 Sep 2012 10:43:10 7,024 posts
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    You took Deckard1's dog? This will not end well...

    PSN: DonOsito

  • elstoof 29 Sep 2012 10:46:28 7,811 posts
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    I really want a dog. Poor sod would be alone for 10 hours a day though, even getting a wee dog house and leaving it in the garden would feel wrong. I need to either get super rich, start my own firm, or maybe both, I think.
  • sirtacos 29 Sep 2012 11:00:23 7,336 posts
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    Regarding my selection of breeds, I need a dog who can intimidate the people I mug.

    Also, the dog has to go well with my turned up collar and modded Vauxhall Corsa.

    Anyway it looks like we'll be getting a puppy then.
    A puppy should be more of a blank slate, as you've all helpfully pointed out. I'll stay away from breeders and pet shops, though. I want a rescue even if it means more hassle.
  • monkehhh 29 Sep 2012 11:04:15 3,437 posts
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    Had a dream last night I had a great dane, think I want a greyhound though.
  • ElNuevo9 29 Sep 2012 12:58:41 13,493 posts
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    mowgli wrote:
    We're getting a dog at the start of November :)
    Last dog was a rescue dog but there are certain habits we just outright have not been able to break so getting a puppy this time. Good training for a baby apparently! I wanted a St Bernard or husky, missus wanted a little lap dog, we settled on "the gay dog Deckard1 has"
    Can't bloody wait.
    I only recommended a husky if you're very experienced with dogs. There are a lot creeping up dog centres for a good reason; they're hard work, even for experienced dog handlers. I know someone that had them for years and even he knew, no matter how well trained they are, that they sometimes do what the hell they want.

    Bit of a fashion accessory at the moment for morons who think it cool to a a dog that looks like a wolf for a little while.

    Edited by ElNino9 at 13:01:03 29-09-2012

    Hated, adored, never ignored.

  • spindle9988 29 Sep 2012 13:10:13 3,629 posts
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    A little staffie puupy would be great. Once trained well they are normally great with kids, even to the point that they really defend them so be careful with play fighting and stuff. My aunt had a staff from a pup called Luca. My baby cousin Paris literally used to hit him over the head with a hairbrush and not once did he get annoyed, or growl. Staffs have a bad rep but my family have had a few (including myself) and they are a really solid and friendly breed provided they are trained properly
  • AaronTurner 29 Sep 2012 13:12:19 7,792 posts
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    I think a puppy is a good choice. I presume you're fairly inexperienced with dogs in which case I would advise against getting a rescued adult dog of any of the breeds you mentioned.

    I know what I'm about to say will sound quite patronising but it isn't meant to be. Give serious thought to the decision you are about to make, don't make a snap decision, sleep on it for a while. Think about these things:

    What do you plan on doing in 5, 10, 15 or 20 years time? Make no mistake, a dog can seriously limit some choices in life.

    How stable is your relationship and what would happen if you split from your girlfriend?

    What are your living circumstances? Are you renting? If so be prepared for the fact that 90% of landlords will not rent you property for the sole reason that you have a dog. The other 10% will speak to you a d perhaps 5% will be prepared to rent you accommodation.

    Do you gave a good support network in case your circumstances change? Will there be someone that can look after the dog if you want to go on holiday?

    I only ask these question as I've personally found life extremely difficult at points owing to being a pet owner. I got my dog half my life ago and wasn't in any position to even consider the situation I would be in at the present moment. Having said that obviously there are huge benefits also.

    Of course, you could be settled 40 year old home owner, in which case have fun. If you're young and still working out life then I'd spend some serious time thinking over the next few months. Each time you do something ask yourself if you would still be able to do that if you own a dog. Something as simple as going out for Friday night drinks after work can be difficult if you own a dog.

    Edited by AaronTurner at 13:14:36 29-09-2012
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