Mars Science Laboratory Page 5

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  • Khanivor 6 Aug 2012 18:02:23 40,772 posts
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    SolidSCB wrote:
    RabidChild wrote:
    Probably a very stupid question: how did things like the Viking probe send pics back? It was before digital photography, right?
    It stopped off at the Kodak on Mars and got them developed. Why did you think there was a 48hr delay?
    I read a post where someone mentioned how a few years ago we though one hour photo development was the bollocks. Now a robot on another planet sends us pictures a few minutes after arriving in a roar of rockets and dust.
  • Ged42 6 Aug 2012 18:14:37 7,732 posts
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    How far is Curiosity from the other Rovers?

    it would be cool to go and have a look at them.
  • Chopsen 6 Aug 2012 18:21:16 15,995 posts
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    It'd be more cool if they found Beagle 2.
  • SolidSCB 6 Aug 2012 18:22:16 6,706 posts
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    Khanivor wrote:
    SolidSCB wrote:
    RabidChild wrote:
    Probably a very stupid question: how did things like the Viking probe send pics back? It was before digital photography, right?
    It stopped off at the Kodak on Mars and got them developed. Why did you think there was a 48hr delay?
    I read a post where someone mentioned how a few years ago we though one hour photo development was the bollocks. Now a robot on another planet sends us pictures a few minutes after arriving in a roar of rockets and dust.
    Really is amazing how far we've come so quickly.
  • Bremenacht 6 Aug 2012 18:31:58 18,275 posts
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    Ged42 wrote:
    How far is Curiosity from the other Rovers?

    it would be cool to go and have a look at them.
    Mars map:

    Curiosity is in the 'Gale Crater'. Bit of a drive : )

    Edited by Bremenacht at 18:33:23 06-08-2012
  • Ged42 6 Aug 2012 18:48:57 7,732 posts
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    Bremenacht wrote:
    Ged42 wrote:
    How far is Curiosity from the other Rovers?

    it would be cool to go and have a look at them.
    Mars map:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_606w/2010-2019/WashingtonPost/2011/11/17/Others/Images/2011-11-17/Mars201321569901.jpg
    Curiosity is in the 'Gale Crater'. Bit of a drive : )
    Would still be interesting to see how the Martian environment effects our tech over a long periods, especially for any long term Mars efforts.

    As well as providing some cool photo ops for NASA.
  • ecureuil 7 Aug 2012 00:16:47 76,812 posts
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    Billy_Sastard wrote:
    Khanivor wrote:
    Descent shot
    Whoah that's mind blowing, is that real? I hope it is.
    It's real. It was captured by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
  • DodgyPast 7 Aug 2012 05:21:48 8,468 posts
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    Billy_Sastard wrote:
    Ka-blamo wrote:
    What's the diffrence between this and all the other rovers that've landed on mars?
    It's got lasers dumbass. ;)
    It's nuclear powered which I'm guessing means it'll be able to do do a hell of a lot more before running out of juice.

    Plus more sophisticated sensors.
  • stephenb 7 Aug 2012 09:30:35 2,738 posts
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    @DodgyPast

    NASA are predicting a fourteen year life span for Curiosity on it's battery. That is likely to be conservative as they never deliberately raise expectations on the life of missions.

    Case in point was Pathfinder and Opportunity which were given 18 months but lasted over double that.

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • sport 7 Aug 2012 09:35:19 12,731 posts
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    Chopsen wrote:
    It'd be more cool if they found Beagle 2.
    Covered in claw marks /o\
  • glaeken 7 Aug 2012 09:41:20 11,174 posts
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    @Billy_Sastard Pretty cool though it is kind of funny that for most of it you are just looking at a brown square. It's a rather barren place.
  • DaM 7 Aug 2012 09:47:23 13,210 posts
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    stephenb wrote:
    @DodgyPast

    NASA are predicting a fourteen year life span for Curiosity on it's battery. That is likely to be conservative as they never deliberately raise expectations on the life of missions.

    Case in point was Pathfinder and Opportunity which were given 18 months but lasted over double that.
    Wouldn't it be great if it is still active to capture the first manned landing. 2030? If they put their mind (and money) to it?
  • stephenb 7 Aug 2012 09:51:33 2,738 posts
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    @DaM

    Totally, but they'll be Chinese and will pan it's cameras in with a crowbar :)

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • mcmonkeyplc 7 Aug 2012 10:16:37 39,457 posts
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    That would be epic Dam! They'd have to move the rover out of the crater though I assume unless we landed people there.

    It concerns me yesterday I heard someone from Nasa say they want to put people in Mars orbit in the 2030s and land people on Mars in the following decades.

    That is far too long. I may be dead by then. They will have lost an entire generation of people that didn't witness any great exploration.

    This fucking economic mess needs sorting so we can get going again.

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • Fab4 7 Aug 2012 11:08:31 6,077 posts
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    The photo from Curiosity with Mount Sharp in the background is awesome.
  • mal 7 Aug 2012 11:33:46 22,551 posts
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    DodgyPast wrote:It's nuclear powered which I'm guessing means it'll be able to do do a hell of a lot more before running out of juice.
    According to wikipedia, it's got the same sort of power plant as the Viking probe had - not a reactor per se, not using fissile material, but something that uses the fact that plutonium produces a bit of heat to generate electricity. I'd imagine it's a bit bigger than what was on the Viking landers, but apparently it's not the first spacecraft with a nuclear heater on board.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • Fake_Blood 7 Aug 2012 12:04:58 4,211 posts
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    Thermal nuclear generators have been used in lots of spacecraft, most notably the voyager missions which were launched in the 70s and are still going right now and will continue to do so till at least 2025. It's basically a battery that works for 50 years.

    Spirit and opportunity had 90 day missions planned and kept going for years. ( On solar cells).

    What is so different about curiosity is the science package. On spirit and opportunity they had a small 10kg minilab, on curiosity they have 100kg of analysers and what not in there.

    The previous missions looked at what Mars is made of right now, the goal of curiosity is to look at what Mars used to be like. That's why they landed in a crater, there's billions of years of rocks right there at the surface.

    Next few days should be interesting, they are raising the camera head so we can get some HD panoramas, they are figuring out where curiosity landed exactly, so it can point it's little dish directly at earth so we can get some bandwith going. Then there's a day of nothing but downloading descent data.
    I'm not totally sure but I think we might get some descent video instead of the couple of images they released.
    Also, there is a bog standard digicam on there, so we should also get some real colour images back. It's the first time we will see mars like we would if we were really there.

    Still amazed everything went so well.
    Nerds did this, and it's awesome.
  • Chopsen 7 Aug 2012 12:08:52 15,995 posts
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    iirc Huygens (the probe one wot went to Europa) relied on nuclear power. Stuff sent further out can't rely on solar power as there's not enough sunlight. In Curiosity's case, it just too big and needs more power than the previous landers required.
  • Immaterial 7 Aug 2012 12:42:44 1,377 posts
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    Has the sky crane section just been boosted out of the way, or is it in orbit above the lander or what?

    Think I'll just switch everything off.

  • Chopsen 7 Aug 2012 12:44:30 15,995 posts
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    Crash landed out of the way.
  • Ryze 7 Aug 2012 16:13:15 3,124 posts
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    @Fake_Blood

    Engineers did it, and yes, it's awesome.
  • pauleyc 7 Aug 2012 16:26:05 4,462 posts
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    First color picture from MAHLI (murky due to the dust cover).
  • ecureuil 7 Aug 2012 16:27:57 76,812 posts
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    And these.
  • Fake_Blood 7 Aug 2012 16:56:51 4,211 posts
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    Ryze wrote:
    @Fake_Blood

    Engineers did it, and yes, it's awesome.
    Find me one engineer that is not a nerd :)
  • wobbly_Bob 7 Aug 2012 17:27:54 1,762 posts
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    Billy_Sastard wrote:
    @mcmonkeyplc

    I don't think it's an economic issue, I think it's a technological issue, you'd be in space for a long time plus there's your resources you need to live for that long in space, the spacecraft would have to be completely different in design to anything we've seen before so you can live comfortably on it for say two years or however long it would take to get there and back.
    And political, I think. I'm hope the strides that China and India are making in space spill kick off a new space race. I would dearly live to see a maned Mars mission. There has been some postulaton it would be a ove way trip. If I want with somebody I would volunteer without a second thought.
  • Ryze 7 Aug 2012 17:50:43 3,124 posts
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    A one way trip to Mars, with plenty of scope for exploration and communication with earth, plus a load of supplies and equipment sent in advance would be an interesting thing to witness indeed.

    I do wonder how the world will change over the next couple of decades, and who will seriously implement plans for this first.

    The cost would likely be ludicrous. I wonder how much water would be needed in order to create a decent cycle of purification to keep a person going for the rest of their lives?

    TBH I'd like a cluster of solid gold and platinum asteroids the size of Wales to be spotted somewhere nearby in the solar system. That'd help kickstart serious space travel.
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