Learning to code.

  • Page

    of 7 First / Last

    Previous
  • RedSparrows 14 Mar 2012 12:32:09 22,241 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    Hello

    I have dabbled in some coding before, but can anyone recommend a good way to self-teach? Books, certain languages, net resources etc.

    Ta for any help.
  • Grump 14 Mar 2012 12:40:39 1,180 posts
    Seen 52 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    www.codeacademy.com
  • disusedgenius 14 Mar 2012 12:45:32 5,271 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    [Language] For Dummies books are pretty good.
  • grey_matters 14 Mar 2012 12:45:53 3,687 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    I mostly only have experience in programming computers to calculate something for myself but I was thinking of starting to create apps for an Android phone to develop things a bit. The creation process can range from very simple to reasonably complicated so it should have a nice learning curve. Plus, you may end up creating something semi-useful and are able to carry it around with you.

    What is your ultimate goal? That might refine your starting point somewhat.

    Edited by grey_matters at 12:46:28 14-03-2012
  • MMMarmite 14 Mar 2012 12:47:00 1,013 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Any particular language you're aiming towards?

    For basics you could start with Code Academy, it's an completely online-based intro to programming.

    Alternatively you could pick up a Deitel How to Program book in the language you want to learn. They are well written and fairly easy to follow and build up your knowledge to complete a complex program by the end of the book. It's what I used when I was starting on Java.
  • mal 14 Mar 2012 12:55:39 22,419 posts
    Seen 13 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    I initially learned Python using the standard tutorial from its website. It's a nice language for both beginners and experienced programmers, but it won't much help you if you want to code Android or iPhone apps. You can do almost anything else with it though.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • RedSparrows 14 Mar 2012 13:03:19 22,241 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    Thanks guys. I am leaning towards Java, for Android dev. Just a choice based on what is popular at the moment. Is Java a language that would set me up nicely for others?

    Is there one which acts as a key to the rest, or are they all lead-ins, in a way?
  • disusedgenius 14 Mar 2012 13:04:50 5,271 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    RedSparrows wrote:
    Is Java a language that would set me up nicely for others?
    Yes, basically. :)

    I know a few proper coders who started with Java before going all C++.
  • jakuande 14 Mar 2012 13:06:10 192 posts
    Seen 7 months ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Flash (Action Script) is a fun language to start with. Mainly because you don't have to do much to get a visible on screen result. Assuming you want to try and make a game I'd recommend using the flashpunk or flixel libraries to make it even easier. Here's a link to flashpunk's tutorials : Flashpunk Tutes which will show you how to set up everything from scratch.

    Edited by jakuande at 13:06:36 14-03-2012
  • Fab4 14 Mar 2012 13:07:31 5,986 posts
    Seen 44 minutes ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    If you are going down the book road, the Head First series are good at keeping your interest and explaining things in a way that ordinary mortals might find easier :)
  • WrongShui 14 Mar 2012 13:07:35 6,609 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    I started with C++ in October 2010 and switch to Java for some Android messing about at Christmas, I get the feeling it would be easier going C++ to Java than vice versa but not enough to get worked up about.
  • MMMarmite 14 Mar 2012 13:07:49 1,013 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Java is popular for teaching coding, especially OOP. Once you've learned the theory behind the programming you should be able to pickup other language more quickly.

    Java is a good starting point, as is Python, more so Java if you want to do Android development.
  • AcidSnake 14 Mar 2012 13:33:14 7,233 posts
    Seen 4 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    @RedSparrows:
    Let me know if you find anything good, I've been trying to get into Android as well lately but the Google online docs are a bit confusing...

    I'm quite good with JavaScript (bit rusty with pure Java) but the whole structure of it is still confusing me somewhat...

    AcidSnake - He can't see your sig, avatar, images or vids and talks about himself in the third person because he's proper old-skool...UID 24017

  • monkehhh 14 Mar 2012 19:18:29 3,292 posts
    Seen 3 minutes ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    If you can get a good grasp of the fundamentals - looping, branching, variables, etc - then often you'll need to just look up the specific way a language implements something and you're away.

    I learnt C++ with a Deitel book through uni and it seemed like a decent book, my personal choice is Python for 'fun' :)
  • mal 15 Mar 2012 02:35:45 22,419 posts
    Seen 13 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    All languages are good for leading you onto other languages. I initially learned BASIC which is a shit language by any metric then moved on to 6502 assembler, ARM assembler, C++, COBOL, Haskell, Prolog, Fortran, Perl, Python, Javascript. I'd say to be a good programmer you need to learn at least two different paradigms; BASIC, assembler, COBOL and Fortran are all procedural; C++ and Java are both OO; Python and Perl are OO and procedural, depending on how you use them; Haskell is functional; and Prolog and Javascript are their own weird concoctions.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • Deleted user 15 March 2012 02:40:25
    AFAIK, a lot of universities still use Java as a primer language towards OO-development, so working from Java as a basis would stand you in good stead.
  • Tonka 15 Mar 2012 07:40:16 20,168 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Don't waste your money on books. Use the internet instead.

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • Deleted user 15 March 2012 08:37:59
    Tonka wrote:
    Don't waste your money on books. Use the internet instead.
    This. The Codeyear thing that CodeAcademy are doing seems really well paced and has a ton of community support right now. Only 8 weeks in at the moment so not too hard to catch up either. They're doing Javascript but as has been said elsewhere, the syntax of a language isn't the biggest obstacle, it's dealing with the concepts of handling loops, variables and the step-by-step processes of laying shit out. Javascript's as good a place to learn that as any
  • DaM 15 Mar 2012 10:07:10 12,971 posts
    Seen 19 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    I've been thinking about starting something with my eldest, nearly 8. I think every child should be taught the basics of programming, even if you never go near a computer, it teaches you how to break down a problem and solve it.

    IT courses at schools (in Scotland at least) seem to just teach how to use a word processor etc, woefully outdated - nothing that kids don't pick up themselves in primary school. They are getting replaced soon - a teacher was on the radio today saying how the GSCE equivalent course still teaches about floppy disks!

    I had a rare day of coding last week, just crunching sales figures into charts for a meeting, had forgotten how rewarding it is :)
  • RunningMan 15 Mar 2012 10:23:22 2,391 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    My lad seems to be teaching himself how to code via minecraft. He's built a digital clock out of redstone. Impressive stuff.
    IT at school, don't get me started. My lad got detention as he failed an IT test. The questions consisted of naming the file extensions in excel. Words fail me.

    Edited by RunningMan at 10:23:40 15-03-2012
  • Rusty_M 15 Mar 2012 11:53:02 4,640 posts
    Seen 5 hours ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    Detention for failing a test is just wrong IMO. It's like saying "how dare you not remember that stuff"

    The world is going mad. Me? I'm doing fine.

  • warlockuk 15 Mar 2012 11:59:37 19,142 posts
    Seen 5 days ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Books are good, actually. The intro chapters give you a bit of background and tell you how whole systems and things hang together and where to find the online SDK / Language reference documents.

    After that, the book goes into the bog, and you flip through idly picking up info while taking a dump. I call it the "Research Lavoratory".

    I'm a grumpy bastard.

  • DaM 15 Mar 2012 12:02:16 12,971 posts
    Seen 19 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    I tried and failed several times with that book that came with the Spectrum. Horace Goes Skiing was obviously too much of a distraction.
  • Tonka 15 Mar 2012 12:26:34 20,168 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    warlockuk wrote:
    Books are good, actually. The intro chapters give you a bit of background and tell you how whole systems and things hang together and where to find the online SDK / Language reference documents.

    All of that is readily available on the web, and kept up to date, and usually comes with comment sections.

    I'd say an old iPad would be abetter investment than a bunch of books.

    Horses for courses though but I really can't see the point of buying a book to learn stuff about computers.

    /stares at practically untouched versions of various Java books
    /opens cabinet at the office filled with mint condition O'Reily books (all outdated)

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • coastal 15 Mar 2012 12:38:14 5,382 posts
    Seen 3 days ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    RedSparrows, go buy a decent java book & an android java dev book and get stuck in with knocking up silly stupid example-led apps. Don't rush at your big idea just yet. Get some experience, and then buy a design patterns book (heads first for example). Then go for it.

    bf3: sergeant_shaftoe

  • coastal 15 Mar 2012 12:38:33 5,382 posts
    Seen 3 days ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Perhaps Tonka can send you one of his ;-)

    bf3: sergeant_shaftoe

  • mal 15 Mar 2012 12:53:43 22,419 posts
    Seen 13 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Ooh, don't get me started on bloody design patterns. Some of the patterns are useful in that they become terminology for talking about algorithms, but most of them are so fucking specific that you end up twisting your design in all sorts of weird directions just so you can employ the visitor pattern unnecessarily.

    Basically, write your algorithm first, then read it back to see what design patterns you've inadvertently used. It won't help make your coding better, but it will help you talk about it to someone else.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • RunningMan 15 Mar 2012 12:58:42 2,391 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    @RedSparrow, if you're programming for Android and using the android scripting environment, then lua and python are supported. Lua is a small scripting language that's used in game modding and it pretty simple. May be worth a look.
  • RunningMan 15 Mar 2012 12:58:59 2,391 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    @mal, only need one design patten, singleton :)
  • Tonka 15 Mar 2012 13:06:05 20,168 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    @RunningMan Oi! No need for name calling!

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • Page

    of 7 First / Last

    Previous
Log in or register to reply