Building extension costs Page 2

  • Page

    of 3 First / Last

  • mrpon 21 Feb 2013 14:08:44 30,707 posts
    Seen 23 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    Well apparently the cheaper one doesn't involve building regs, which essentially means they can cut corners. However you could become unstuck when you want to sell.
  • DaM 21 Feb 2013 14:09:33 14,264 posts
    Seen 14 hours ago
    Registered 14 years ago
    mrpon wrote:
    I'm looking to get extension/conservatory/orangery added on and had two quotes so far, 16k and 28k.

    o_O
    You orangery ponce!!!!!
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 14:27:32 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Woo hoo, 500 not entirely wasted....building control are happy with the foundations. Now to get plans drawn up....how much are architects these days? Fear I'm going to have to lean on extended family to get these done....
  • RunningMan 7 Mar 2013 14:32:44 2,538 posts
    Seen 8 hours ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    I got some plans drawn up for a one story extension for 400. Some builders will be able to do this for you. Do you have a builder in mind? Might be worth talking to them first.
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 14:39:29 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    The one who is doing the ground work said he's no good at all that, but does know a few people who can do it (but aren't architects). As I say, got one in the extended family, so might be easier to pay travel costs, put them up for the weekend and get them to do it at cost.
  • Randomlampy 7 Mar 2013 14:46:05 580 posts
    Seen 2 years ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    @mrpon Don't know if you made the choice in the end that man, but we had a conservatory added in April last year and had a similar choice 13k without regs and keeping existing patio doors or 22k for building regs and removing patio doors and making it "4 season" insulated.

    In the end chose the more expensive option for that extra peace of mind come sale time as you say, and to remove the existing doors to make downstairs more open plan. Not sure if I'd say it was worth every penny as that aint walking around money but it is getting close :)

    Best of luck

    Best of british to you too Dougs, with no experience in the family I made the choice to use a traditional "all in one" company to plan the lot for which I paid a premium, but if you've got that option then good for you.
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 15:03:06 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Cheers - have dabbled my toe and asked how much architects are as a starting point, you never know, they might offer to do it! I approached the subject last time I saw them, and was probably quite transparent...!
  • Nexus_6 7 Mar 2013 15:16:45 3,927 posts
    Seen 4 days ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    A proper architect, appointed from the start should charge a flat fee based on the level of service required, and as a percentage of the construction cost.

    For example if you are doing a full extension with kitchen/bathroom etc and you want design (which is important and a service to pay for - you can always spot who has got the builder to lay something out on a bit of a4 paper to cover planning and warrant), planning and building warrant submissions and even some details of the construction of the thing, along with site supervision and payments to builders (if that is required) then you are looking to shell out up to 7% of the cost of building it.

    On the other hand if you only want a set of planning drawings and warrant drawings to take to a builder to knock up in his usual manner then it would be less, but not below about 3% i would say.
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 15:20:02 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Yeah, we'll need some design work inside as we want to make the existing bathroom smaller, and re-model with the extension to give us a 3rd bedroom.
  • Nexus_6 7 Mar 2013 15:42:10 3,927 posts
    Seen 4 days ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    OK, in that case then I would be getting an actual architect to look at it.

    This is so they can provide you with impartial advice and hopefully a clever design to maximise the potential of the work.

    A builder is more apt to simply do it the easiest way he can without putting much thought in to things, which can work out more expensive in the long run.

    If you cant get your tame architect to do the work, (i was about to type 'look in the phonebook there...') get on to the RIBA website and dont be afraid to call a practice that looks like it would suit you. In fact, call 3 - they will more than likely do you a free consultation at your house.
    Description_here
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 15:48:58 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Cheers - that was always our assumption, but just wondered on costs. As I say, we have an architect in the extended family (sister-in-law's, brother's wife!) so they might offer, otherwise I'll get a few round to offer a quote. Don't really want to cut corners on something like this.
  • Nexus_6 7 Mar 2013 16:17:12 3,927 posts
    Seen 4 days ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    That's good to hear - plenty people assume that a builder will just take care of everything and no need for an architect.

    Problem is, often what the architect brings to the table is intangible in terms of real world benefits. Sometimes its just a slightly better layout, a sensible position of a room or a door etc. Difficult to quantify.

    Let me know how it goes, and remember, engaging an architect means you are getting a lot of protection built-in if anything goes tits up.

    edit - and if you werent in London (i think...?) I would offer my services, unless you want to pay airfare from Glasgow too? ;-)

    Edited by Nexus_6 at 16:18:07 07-03-2013
  • Dougs 7 Mar 2013 16:27:26 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Now on the Isle of Wight! If it was a straightforward build I'd be more tempted just to get someone to throw something together, but we're probably going to have to have a pitched roof joining our existing roof, plus all the work inside, which should be straightforward enough, but as you say will need careful design as the layout will be different to say the least!
  • mrpon 7 Mar 2013 16:52:20 30,707 posts
    Seen 23 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    @Randomlampy Cheers fella, no not made decision yet. Though funnily enough the expensive company have been back on since and dropped the top end price from 28k to 22k. Amazing what happens if you make em sweat!
  • Randomlampy 7 Mar 2013 17:55:15 580 posts
    Seen 2 years ago
    Registered 7 years ago
    @mrpon Yeah we managed to shave off an easy 2 grand by dragging them on for a month or two while we desperately gathered what money we could find :)

    22k from 28k is nice though :)
  • Dougs 22 Mar 2013 13:23:04 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    About 700 for the plans, application to planning, taking it through building regs etc, so not too bad. 1st bloke I rung is the only one (from 4) who has bothered to get back to me, and came recommended anyway. Eeeek!
  • fergal_oc 22 Mar 2013 13:32:55 2,764 posts
    Seen 6 months ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I was quoted 45k for my single storey extension and roof pull. I've yet to do it :(
  • Dougs 22 Mar 2013 13:36:40 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Fuck! Hoping that as the foundations are sound it'll be much cheaper. 20k would be ideal imo
  • Dougs 22 Mar 2013 13:39:40 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Oh, and I bet if you quoted now you'd get a much cheaper result!
  • THFourteen 11 Jun 2015 15:51:32 37,320 posts
    Seen 26 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Anyone out there got underfloor heating? We are set to go with our extension next week, but i'm still undecided about whether to go for electric or water.

    Problem with water is, our current boiler and tank is incompatible, meaning an extra 4.5k.

    Plus the cost of the underfloor system and installation itself is 5k

    With electric, assuming an area of 36msquare the materials are 1100, and i am not sure how much installation is yet.

    But the running costs assuming 6h per day @ 12p p/KWh seem to come to 1300 a year!!

    Is that right??

    Also i don't have the running costs of the water system to compare to, as obviously they are not zero.
  • Dougs 11 Jun 2015 16:06:19 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    That does sound pricey. Also sounds like electric is the one to go for, from a quick google. Is the useable floor space 36msq? Or size of room in total?

    http://www.uswitch.com/gas-electricity/guides/underfloor-heating/

    Edit: You probably saw this link, but in case not...

    http://www.thermogroupuk.com/electric-underfloor-heating-running-costs

    Or you could all just wear slippers!

    Edited by Dougs at 16:07:33 11-06-2015
  • THFourteen 11 Jun 2015 16:21:02 37,320 posts
    Seen 26 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Hmmm my googling suggested water was more recommended after you take into account high installation costs?

    Yeah that webiste is the one i used to base my calculations on. Found another website which does it all for you and it reckons a slightly more palatable 880 per year, and thats assuming its on for 12 months a year which it wouldnt be.

    36m total area so yeah there would be a lot covered by the kitchen etc that wouldnt need heating.

    Lets call it 600 per month then, so 7.5 years before it outweights the initial cost of replacing the hot water ~ 4.5k
  • Dougs 11 Jun 2015 16:27:38 72,977 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    The u-switch link seemed to suggest the running cost of a water system is only marginally cheaper though...
  • PES_Fanboy 11 Jun 2015 16:47:57 25,147 posts
    Seen 19 seconds ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Well, if it's anything like my flat, the leccy underfloor heating ongoing costs rivals the U.S. National debt clock
  • THFourteen 11 Jun 2015 16:52:00 37,320 posts
    Seen 26 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Just spoke to the people who run this company :
    https://www.allbriteuk.co.uk/ref/underfloor-heating-faq/is-underfloor-heating-expensive-to-run

    They did a good sell. Apparently the system they sell doesn't require screed, you just lay it under the tiles. Because its closer to the tile, it therefore heats the room much faster.

    But what he said essentially was, if you dont insulate your new room correctly it doesnt matter what system you go for, it will cost a lot to run. As we are building a new bit, our best bet is to make sure its well insulated.
  • TSD 11 Jun 2015 17:03:34 1,466 posts
    Seen 8 hours ago
    Registered 5 months ago
    In my experience, underfloor heating really isn't worth the effort or cost. Most people I know/heard of quickly have it pulled up or disconnected.
  • Armoured_Bear 11 Jun 2015 17:12:10 14,777 posts
    Seen 2 days ago
    Registered 3 years ago
    TSD wrote:
    In my experience, underfloor heating really isn't worth the effort or cost. Most people I know/heard of quickly have it pulled up or disconnected.
    I've had it in rented apartments for the last 10 years and love it, getting out of bed in winter for a piss and being comforted with warmth underfoot is pretty fucking awesome.
    It's great, rooms are heated evenly and you gain loads of space and flexibility with furniture/decoration etc.
  • TSD 11 Jun 2015 17:17:10 1,466 posts
    Seen 8 hours ago
    Registered 5 months ago
    There's a much cheaper alternative to tackle that. They're called, slippers. :p
  • THFourteen 11 Jun 2015 17:21:15 37,320 posts
    Seen 26 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Yeah my parents have it at their house and its blimming awesome tbh.

    Different experiences I guess.
  • wrinkly 11 Jun 2015 18:33:17 2,163 posts
    Seen 9 hours ago
    Registered 9 months ago
    I've installed it in the main bathroom walls as well as the floor in the shower of our place in France. Superdoopah!
  • Page

    of 3 First / Last

Log in or register to reply