Next generation of consoles come in Page 33

  • Page

    of 402 First / Last

  • jellyhead 22 Jan 2013 18:55:02 24,350 posts
    Seen 1 year ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    Wasn't there a change in the lasers used in CD drives that made some of the older RW media more prone to read errors too?

    Frequency or some such voodoo.

    This signature intentionally left blank.

  • mrpon 22 Jan 2013 19:00:25 29,436 posts
    Seen 7 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    I hope my old Atari ST disks work. God I loved that thing.

    /sniff

    Give yourself £5 or ½ gig, you're worth it.

  • mrpon 22 Jan 2013 19:31:22 29,436 posts
    Seen 7 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago

    Give yourself £5 or ½ gig, you're worth it.

  • Fake_Blood 22 Jan 2013 19:39:01 4,389 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 5 years ago
    That's a disk alright.
  • neilka 22 Jan 2013 20:06:32 16,471 posts
    Seen 12 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    FRENCH?!?!

    BAAANG!!!!! EXPLOTION!!!!!

  • ronuds 22 Jan 2013 20:10:37 21,788 posts
    Seen 1 year ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    There's a difference!

    Discs

    A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. Some discs are read-only (ROM), others allow you to burn content (write files) to the disc once (such as a CD-R or DVD-R, unless you do a multisession burn), and some can be erased and rewritten over many times (such as CD-RW, DVD-RW, and DVD-RAM discs).

    All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.

    Disks

    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected. You can easily partition a disk into several smaller volumes, too.

    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").
  • Blaizefm 22 Jan 2013 20:13:42 232 posts
    Seen 2 days ago
    Registered 4 years ago
    DarkSpaceDS wrote:
    mrpon wrote:
    I hope my old Atari ST disks work. God I loved that thing.

    /sniff
    Disc not disk.
    Sir, I believe you got owned.
  • Deleted user 22 January 2013 20:17:24
    Totally forgot about floppy disks. They were nightmares for parents and schools. Just pulling back the silver bits because i good.
  • mal 22 Jan 2013 20:40:38 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Oh sure, the only games I replay to completion from past generations are those games that can be completed in less than fifteen minutes, because that's about how long I play most older games. For the vast majority it's pure nostalgia, and just booting up the loading screen is enough for that most of the time.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • Deleted user 22 January 2013 20:41:17
    neilka wrote:
    FRENCH?!?!
    le disk
  • Deleted user 22 January 2013 20:56:30
    The mention of the Atari ST should have been a giveaway.
  • mal 22 Jan 2013 20:56:33 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    ronuds wrote:
    There's a difference!

    Discs

    A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. Some discs are read-only (ROM), others allow you to burn content (write files) to the disc once (such as a CD-R or DVD-R, unless you do a multisession burn), and some can be erased and rewritten over many times (such as CD-RW, DVD-RW, and DVD-RAM discs).

    All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.

    Disks

    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected. You can easily partition a disk into several smaller volumes, too.

    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").
    That's a fucking odd revisionist etymology there. Where's it from? CDs are referred to as 'compact discs' because Philips chose to transliterate from the Greek by substituting a 'c' for a kappa, rather than a 'k' (as is the fashion in European English). Most magnetic media was invented in the US, where I believe Webster's only permits the 'disk' spelling.

    On European-made computers, such as the BBC Micro, you could access the floppy disc file system either by issuing *DISC or *DISK (and in BBC BASIC you could change the cursor colour either using the COLOR or COLOUR command). By that etymology both are acceptable for magnetic media, and I would infer from that that it's entirely a stylistic spelling choice. 'CD' may stand for 'compact disc' but that doesn't stop the medium consisting of disks of plastic.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • mal 22 Jan 2013 20:59:24 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    meme wrote:
    neilka wrote:
    FRENCH?!?!
    le disk
    le disque compact.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • ronuds 22 Jan 2013 21:00:50 21,788 posts
    Seen 1 year ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    mal wrote:
    ronuds wrote:
    There's a difference!

    Discs

    A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. Some discs are read-only (ROM), others allow you to burn content (write files) to the disc once (such as a CD-R or DVD-R, unless you do a multisession burn), and some can be erased and rewritten over many times (such as CD-RW, DVD-RW, and DVD-RAM discs).

    All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.

    Disks

    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected. You can easily partition a disk into several smaller volumes, too.

    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").
    That's a fucking odd revisionist etymology there. Where's it from?
    Apple support:

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2300
  • Jeepers 22 Jan 2013 21:02:28 13,270 posts
    Seen 5 hours ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    mal wrote:
    ronuds wrote:
    There's a difference!

    Discs

    A disc refers to optical media, such as an audio CD, CD-ROM, DVD-ROM, DVD-RAM, or DVD-Video disc. Some discs are read-only (ROM), others allow you to burn content (write files) to the disc once (such as a CD-R or DVD-R, unless you do a multisession burn), and some can be erased and rewritten over many times (such as CD-RW, DVD-RW, and DVD-RAM discs).

    All discs are removable, meaning when you unmount or eject the disc from your desktop or Finder, it physically comes out of your computer.

    Disks

    A disk refers to magnetic media, such as a floppy disk, the disk in your computer's hard drive, an external hard drive. Disks are always rewritable unless intentionally locked or write-protected. You can easily partition a disk into several smaller volumes, too.

    Disks are usually sealed inside a metal or plastic casing (often, a disk and its enclosing mechanism are collectively known as a "hard drive").
    That's a fucking odd revisionist etymology there. Where's it from? CDs are referred to as 'compact discs' because Philips chose to transliterate from the Greek by substituting a 'c' for a kappa, rather than a 'k' (as is the fashion in European English). Most magnetic media was invented in the US, where I believe Webster's only permits the 'disk' spelling.

    On European-made computers, such as the BBC Micro, you could access the floppy disc file system either by issuing *DISC or *DISK (and in BBC BASIC you could change the cursor colour either using the COLOR or COLOUR command). By that etymology both are acceptable for magnetic media, and I would infer from that that it's entirely a stylistic spelling choice. 'CD' may stand for 'compact disc' but that doesn't stop the medium consisting of disks of plastic.
    Durh!

    DISC was first used for CDs and stood for "Data Inside Shiny Circle", noob.
  • Fake_Blood 22 Jan 2013 21:08:05 4,389 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 5 years ago
    la disquette bande d'enfoirés
  • neilka 22 Jan 2013 21:09:45 16,471 posts
    Seen 12 minutes ago
    Registered 9 years ago
    le pompt le pompt le pompt le super discquette

    BAAANG!!!!! EXPLOTION!!!!!

  • Deleted user 22 January 2013 21:10:35
    I was pissing by the wondow when I heard a shat.
  • SBfistfun 22 Jan 2013 22:01:07 124 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    meme wrote:
    I was pissing by the wondow when I heard a shat.
    That made me LOL :)
  • Bremenacht 23 Jan 2013 00:33:09 19,443 posts
    Seen 4 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Do a lot of people here think the PS4 & 720 will cost less than £400 when they're released?
  • Deleted user 23 January 2013 00:36:28
    One probably will, the other one probably not.
  • mal 23 Jan 2013 01:21:27 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    If steambox/Steam on Linux turns out to be anything better than an absolute turd, there's no chance I'm buying a console at anything like that much. Unless Sega come back, that is, natch.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • RobTheBuilder 23 Jan 2013 01:36:20 6,521 posts
    Seen 1 year ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Disk - Diskette

    Disc - shaped like disc

    That will do for me.
  • Bremenacht 23 Jan 2013 01:39:43 19,443 posts
    Seen 4 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Well, they'll all drop in price of course, but not until all the usuals have paid full whack. I doubt very much that either will be less than £399. Love to be wrong though.

    I really don't know if Steambox will do the same thing. I kinda think that they'll put it out at not much above cost in order to drive sales at the Steam store. If they don't, then most people would buy a PC as per usual.
  • mal 23 Jan 2013 01:49:56 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    @FWIW diskette comes from disk, so you can't use that as derivation. Also, what shape are diskettes, if you take off the plastic surround?

    What interests me about Steambox is that you'll be effectively buying a full PC that can do anything, not just run Steam. Much easier to justify a big expense then.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • Dirtbox 23 Jan 2013 03:22:53 78,897 posts
    Seen 43 minutes ago
    Registered 12 years ago
    They're round. They tried square but they wouldn't turn and pretty much rendered all but the small rectangular slot that reveals the media pretty much completely useless.

    As for the steambox, you'll be buying a proprietary linux box that won't run any other OS due to hardware keying or some other convoluted nonsense, or any software that wasn't bought through steam. You will be able to run steam's built in browser, but nothing else.

    On the up-side, it'll keep the price down so they make their revenue from games sales. The downside is that it'll be of no more use than a PS4 or 720 as an open platform.

    Edited by Dirtbox at 03:39:02 23-01-2013

    +1 / Like / Tweet this post

  • mal 23 Jan 2013 03:39:21 22,797 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Yeah, I suppose so. If they were bastards they could tweak the BIOS so you can't boot from USB, and not include a terminal so you can't run something you've downloaded, or off a mounted USB stick. And like you say, hardware key it do you can't even pop the lid off and swap in a new hard disc.

    Oh well, I was planning on building my own Linux gaming PC and slapping Steam on it myself anyway.

    Cubby didn't know how to turn off sigs!

  • Page

    of 402 First / Last

Log in or register to reply