anyone speak Latin? Page 2

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  • ricouk 26 Sep 2011 00:00:53 31 posts
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    Still haven't got a definitive answer to this, anyone? Otto?
  • ZuluHero 26 Sep 2011 00:08:09 4,104 posts
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    My mum knows latin.. Ill ask her...
  • Vice.Destroyer 26 Sep 2011 01:19:02 5,828 posts
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    Salaman wrote:
    Latin is shit though. Wouldn't you prefer it in Dutch?

    Ik wil mij gewoon vet amuseren!

    Go with that.



    Or german? "Ich will eine geile Zeit haben"
  • ricouk 27 Sep 2011 00:11:05 31 posts
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    Err no.
  • Deleted user 27 September 2011 00:15:38
    I "spoke" it for a year but wasn't deemed clever enough to carry it on for a second.

    There went my doctor ambitions :(

    I had to settle for a dirty French A-Level, much to my annoyance :(
  • Deleted user 27 September 2011 01:28:35
    iam volo habere bonum cruentum tempus.

    The sentence you're asking for is idiomatic and there's no precise Latin phrase like it. A word for word translation would be nonsensical to a Roman. Bloody is not used in that way in Latin nor is "have a good time". Translating from a language like English into Latin is a fool's errand, it's bad enough translating in the other direction.
  • Salaman 27 Sep 2011 12:59:13 18,959 posts
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    orcsbane2.0 wrote:
    Salaman wrote:
    Otto's your man. Don't set a foot into the tattoo parlour until he's checked it.

    edit: haha ... I didn't even read the thread. Got it right I see.
    Yeah, there's bound to be a dative somewhere where there should be a locative or something, and then he'll have to get it crossed out because all the people who know Latin perfectly will laugh at him behind his back for his grievous error.

    He'll post it on the internets all proud and shit and then eh'll find out he's got "girls just wanna have fun" in latin carved into his flesh.
    Won't matter much on a day to day basis but he'll know, which will be enough.

  • Buztafen 27 Sep 2011 13:10:22 16,194 posts
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    In pictura est puella, nomina Cornelia.
  • localnotail 27 Sep 2011 13:57:49 23,093 posts
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    zm26 wrote:
    iam volo habere bonum cruentum tempus.

    The sentence you're asking for is idiomatic and there's no precise Latin phrase like it. A word for word translation would be nonsensical to a Roman. Bloody is not used in that way in Latin nor is "have a good time". Translating from a language like English into Latin is a fool's errand, it's bad enough translating in the other direction.

    That's why I went for the Horace quote.

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • Deleted user 27 September 2011 22:27:40
    Salaman wrote:
    Latin is shit though.


    Yes it is, I studied it for 5 years at school. What a complete waste of time that was!
  • DaM 26 Jan 2012 12:02:40 12,996 posts
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    Obviously I'm hoping Otto will make one of his rare appearances to do this one, but could anyone else have a stab at turning "Not fit for purpose" into Latin for me please?!

    Google Translate gives "Non aptus ad", but if I reverse it, it turns that into "Not capable of".

    Must be someone from Latinania out there?
  • mal 26 Jan 2012 12:57:48 22,473 posts
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    Dunno, won't nil operandum do?

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  • DaM 26 Jan 2012 13:17:44 12,996 posts
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    It's a direct quote I'm trying to convey. For comedy reasons :)
  • localnotail 26 Jan 2012 14:03:59 23,093 posts
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    ineptus ad finem? (not fit for the end)

    (but that's probably a wrong usage)

    Edited by localnotail at 14:08:11 26-01-2012

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • Deleted user 26 January 2012 17:51:10
    finem (finis) is correct for aim/purpose. but I think ineptus is more about what is fitting in a social sense and is not simply the opposite of aptus.

    non (est) aptus ad finem is more or less correct although aptus is dependent on a nominative noun that is not provided so could be feminine, masculine or neuter. I could be wrong though as it's not a Roman expression I've ever read.

    Edited by zm26 at 17:53:28 26-01-2012
  • Zero_g 26 Jan 2012 19:50:58 2 posts
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    Ego sum quintus, matella est in canum?
  • mrpon 26 Jan 2012 20:01:52 28,781 posts
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    It's for a tattoo on your penis, isn't it?

    Give yourself 5 or gig, you're worth it.

  • otto Moderator 28 Jan 2012 22:04:17 49,314 posts
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    zm26 wrote:
    finem (finis) is correct for aim/purpose. but I think ineptus is more about what is fitting in a social sense and is not simply the opposite of aptus.

    non (est) aptus ad finem is more or less correct although aptus is dependent on a nominative noun that is not provided so could be feminine, masculine or neuter. I could be wrong though as it's not a Roman expression I've ever read.
    This looks pretty good to me.

    If you want a single word, I've seen 'inopportunus' used as 'unfit for a special purpose' though only in later Latin apparently. Cicero uses 'importunus' and Sallust uses 'inportunus' plus the ablative to mean 'unsuitable, unfit for x'. And if they use it, then you're good to go. So: inportunus fine

    (local put me onto this thread)

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  • DaM 28 Jan 2012 22:12:47 12,996 posts
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    Cheers everyone! The council are closing my kids' school and merging it with another one, which is in much worse condition (it's 120 years old!), in a terrible location, and will be about 120% full. I was designing a new badge for it, with the motto "Not Fit For Purpose" (a quote from the Director of Education!). Spent a year fighting it, but our last chance is to bring down the council in the May elections. What fun!
  • otto Moderator 28 Jan 2012 22:17:29 49,314 posts
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    ricouk wrote:
    Hi people, I'm looking to have this sentence translated into Latin "I just want to
    Have a bloody good time!" if there is anyone out there that does I'd much appreciate it, many thanks.
    ut simpliciter in Saliarem modum epuler
    = I wish merely to feast sumptuously (literally - "oh that I might simply feast in the style of the Persians!")

    (bonus points there for the optative subjunctive :p)

    But that might be a bit prolix for a tattoo in which case you might go with nunc est epulandum (riffing on Horace - "now it's time to party") - or aveo comissori ("I long to engage in drunken revels")

    Edited by otto at 23:09:28 28-01-2012

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  • otto Moderator 28 Jan 2012 22:18:50 49,314 posts
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    Go for it DaM - good luck to you! Beat them into shameful tears with our Latin motto! \o/

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  • Deleted user 17 March 2013 12:12:00
    Duplicate thread ftw !

    So, I was hoping to get a proper translation for 'Easy does it'

    Google translate gives me : 'facilis facit illud' Is that right, or just a literal mangling ?

    Can anyone help, without directing me to a text book ?

    Thanks.
  • MrTomFTW Moderator 17 Mar 2013 12:12:46 37,886 posts
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    bdaggers wants to know! And is too quick for me...

    I'm trying to get a proper Latin translation for the phrase : 'Easy does it'

    Google translate gives me : 'facilis facit illud'.

    I'd assume that is a very literal and probably wrong translation.

    Can anyone do better ?

    Thanks
    Edited by MrTomFTW at 12:13:12 17-03-2013

    Follow me on Twitter: @MrTom
    Voted by the community "Best mod" 2011, 2012 and 2013.

  • otto Moderator 17 Mar 2013 12:44:50 49,314 posts
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    That's just a literal mangling ("it, the easy thing, does")

    "Easy does it" is an English idiom so you won't get a direct translation. You need to think about what you mean by it. Do you want to say "take it easy" - "be calm"?

    You could, for example, say "facite leniter" or "fac leniter" meaning "do it gently/calmly/easily". Or "age leniter" - "conduct yourself in a calm manner" (plural "agite leniter")

    Edited by otto at 12:46:26 17-03-2013

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  • StarchildHypocrethes 17 Mar 2013 12:46:21 25,653 posts
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    It's like an ancient bat signal.
  • otto Moderator 17 Mar 2013 12:48:38 49,314 posts
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    Every few months a PM drops in my gmail inbox requesting Latin help :/

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  • neilka 17 Mar 2013 12:49:56 15,861 posts
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    The Pope won't be any more gentle with you just because you ask him in Latin.

    A map is like comparing velocity and speed.

  • Deleted user 17 March 2013 15:02:44
    Thanks Otto, MrTomFTW.
  • Metalfish 17 Mar 2013 15:26:45 8,818 posts
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    Did someone say ineptus? I think that was the original latin name for the dodo, but they've changed it because apparently biologists have no sense of humour.
  • DaM 17 Mar 2013 15:32:27 12,996 posts
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    otto wrote:
    Every few months a PM drops in my gmail inbox requesting Latin help :/
    At least you have a purpose in life now :)
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