New extra terrestrial discovery

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 19:00:11 77,475 posts
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    Fox reports

    I'm stunned Fox has a science section that isn't dedicated to finding ways to link science with Islam and other such un-American evils that hate freedom. And for that fact alone I am sceptical, but this sort of discovery doesn't even slightly surprise me.

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  • LionheartDJH 5 Mar 2011 19:10:20 19,359 posts
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    Me neither, always thought there was a chance that we didn't just sprout up from here, that the building blocks of life came from elsewhere in the universe. If true would of course be great to have solid proof that that is the case. It is Fox though so as you say, in sceptic mode for the moment.

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 19:10:37 77,475 posts
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    This self proclaimed "scientist" has PhDs in microbial extremophiles, X-Ray/EUV Optic, astrobiology and microscopy amoungst other fictitious nonsense not mentioned in the bible.

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  • Ginger 5 Mar 2011 19:13:36 6,827 posts
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    This looks promising. The amount of scrutiny they're offering is massive!

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  • RyanDS 5 Mar 2011 19:14:52 9,062 posts
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    My only issue with the asteroid seeding concept is how did life get on the asteroids? If life forms on moons / planets whatever any sort of incident that would sperate the rock from it's source is likely to be catastrphic enough to destroy anything surely? An impact large enough to eject a rock from it's planet is surely enough to vapourise any life on that rock?

    Or does the life form on that rock direct? Anyone got any good books on the subject to read?
  • LionheartDJH 5 Mar 2011 19:15:53 19,359 posts
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    Billy_sastard wrote:
    I love this kind of thing, beats 99% of the shit on TV.

    /marks interesting

    Except the X Files of course ;)

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  • LionheartDJH 5 Mar 2011 19:17:14 19,359 posts
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    ryandsimmons wrote:

    Or does the life form on that rock direct? Anyone got any good books on the subject to read?

    The Bible/Qu'ran/Torah. Choose your flava :)

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 19:18:20 77,475 posts
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    ryandsimmons wrote:
    My only issue with the asteroid seeding concept is how did life get on the asteroids? If life forms on moons / planets whatever any sort of incident that would sperate the rock from it's source is likely to be catastrphic enough to destroy anything surely? An impact large enough to eject a rock from it's planet is surely enough to vapourise any life on that rock?

    Or does the life form on that rock direct? Anyone got any good books on the subject to read?
    The asteroids and comets in question are made from the debris of broken planets. Obviously only a very small percentage of an asteroid field made from a broken planet would have such traces, but there they are. Also some are large enough to support an atmosphere and subterranean oceans that could possibly support life on it's own.

    Ceres would be a good example.

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  • Metalfish 5 Mar 2011 19:23:54 8,790 posts
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    What I find interesting about panspermia as an idea is that it doesn't really tell us very much as an explanation -you're just moving the biogenesis from here to somewhere else. I'm not saying it isn't possible though.
  • LionheartDJH 5 Mar 2011 19:25:49 19,359 posts
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    Billy_sastard wrote:
    Life can thrive in the harshest of conditions, just look at life in Scotland.

    Fixed ;)

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  • SirScratchalot 5 Mar 2011 19:32:32 7,872 posts
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    Dirtbox wrote:
    This self proclaimed "scientist" has PhDs in microbial extremophiles, X-Ray/EUV Optic, astrobiology and microscopy amoungst other fictitious nonsense not mentioned in the bible.
    Like America?
  • phAge 5 Mar 2011 19:42:38 24,337 posts
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    ryandsimmons wrote:
    My only issue with the asteroid seeding concept is how did life get on the asteroids? If life forms on moons / planets whatever any sort of incident that would sperate the rock from it's source is likely to be catastrphic enough to destroy anything surely? An impact large enough to eject a rock from it's planet is surely enough to vapourise any life on that rock?
    Not really - extremophiles like our good friend D. radiodurans can take most of what a planet/moon-busting impact can deliver.
  • Fake_Blood 5 Mar 2011 20:09:06 4,074 posts
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    You dirty extremophile!
  • mal 5 Mar 2011 20:29:11 22,339 posts
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    This is all fairly plausable, if you accept the hypothesis that life either did not start here, or was started elsewhere as well as here (and resulted in similar creatures). To fossilise a creature, the most common way is for it to die in a solution of salts, like groundwater here on earth. The cells suck in mineral salts as they die through the failing cell walls, concentrating the minerals. Ceres, the largest dwarf planet sits in the asteroid belt, so is presumably getting the shit kicked out of it 24/7, but is a bit too cold for liquid water, but other (admittedly far more complex) solvents would still be liquid some of the time. TBH if there was life on Ceres at some point, I'd have expected us to have more than half a dozen asteroids from it with bacteria on, but the theory doesn't preclude planets in other solar systems.

    Saying that any of these apparently earth-like bacteria are extremophile enough to survive in interstellar space is another leap though, but if this evidence were to indicate extraterrestrial bacterial life, it would increase the odds just a touch.

    Of course, this news report is extremely premature. It hasn't even been published in a journal yet, so it certainly hasn't been peer reviewed, and the most likely explanation of this sort of find (having not read the report) is failure of clean room techniques, I'd say.

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 20:54:09 77,475 posts
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    Exactly my thoughts.

    Although Ceres is thought to have liquid water under the surface. Mass creates gravity which creates energy which creates endothermic heat after all.

    Even Pluto has endothermic heat which creates methane in it's thin atmosphere.

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  • sport 5 Mar 2011 21:03:52 12,568 posts
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    Dirtbox wrote:
    Exactly my thoughts.

    Although Ceres is thought to have liquid water under the surface. Mass creates gravity which creates energy which creates endothermic heat after all.

    Even Pluto has endothermic heat which creates it's thin methane atmosphere.

    Gravity comes in, energy goes out, can't explain that...
  • Metalfish 5 Mar 2011 21:08:33 8,790 posts
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    Dirtbox wrote:
    Even Pluto has endothermic heat which creates methane in it's thin atmosphere.
    Endothermic heat? What's that mean, chief?
  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 21:11:29 77,475 posts
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    Well, yeah obviously, but you also have to consider how much stuff has hit and couldn't withstand the conditions because, for example, it's too hot. It works both ways.

    it only takes one extremophile to survive and flourish, then evolve over a billion years.

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 21:13:30 77,475 posts
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    Metalfish wrote:
    Dirtbox wrote:
    Even Pluto has endothermic heat which creates methane in it's thin atmosphere.
    Endothermic heat? What's that mean, chief?
    Me making a mess of my words most likely.

    I mean heat from the planets mass that makes the earth's core molten, or turns gas giants into stars.

    Is that exo or endo? Exothermic then.

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  • Dirtbox 5 Mar 2011 21:38:43 77,475 posts
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    CNN is on it now

    Seems to be doing the rounds slowly, but without that peer review, it's wishful thinking.

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  • Deleted user 5 March 2011 22:45:31
    There is no doubt that life exists throughout the entire universe. It would be very narrow minded to believe Earth is the only planet to support life out of billions of galaxies.
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