The UK General Politics Thread Page 48

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  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 22:45:27 30,994 posts
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    The problem with welfare is that the bulk of the cost is made up of housing benefit - which has spiraled out of control due to high rent by private landlords and a lack of council houses.

    If we had a good stock of social housing - both inner-city and in the suburbs - the government could save a lot of money instead of having to pay private landlords exorbitant rents to keep their tenants. This would lead to huge savings on welfare - potentially billions a year. Promises to improve the amount of housing have been made for years, but so far have amounted to very little. And I may be wrong, but all the promises to incentivise massive home-building projects has come with no indication as to how much of those new homes will be used for council housing.

    Edited by darkmorgado at 22:45:45 11-10-2012
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 22:55:08
    The bulk of the cost isn't housing benefit. That makes up, as of June 2010, 16.24% of the total welfare bill.
  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 23:00:50 30,994 posts
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    Have you got a link for that please dude (bearing in mind the data is now 2 1/2 years old)

    Edited by darkmorgado at 23:01:22 11-10-2012
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:04:14
    Yes.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2010/jun/02/liberal-conservative-coalition-welfare

    I even got it from the liberal's bible so it must be good info.
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:05:41
    Although I hope you're not passively-aggressively suggesting that those figures are likely to have increased by 35%+ of the total welfare budget in the last 2.5 years.
  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 23:06:35 30,994 posts
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    Hmmm. Fair enough (assuming that's still accurate).

    It's still the single-most expensive benefit though.
  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 23:07:58 30,994 posts
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    Aargh. wrote:
    Although I hope you're not passively-aggressively suggesting that those figures are likely to have increased by 35%+ of the total welfare budget in the last 2.5 years.
    No, but then unemployment skyrocketed over the last couple of years, and even now with unemployment falling a large amount of those back in work are in part-time work, meaning that while they will not be claiming JSA they will still be eligible for Housing Benefit.

    Would be nice to see some more up-to-date data on the subject.
  • Moot_Point 11 Oct 2012 23:08:22 5,530 posts
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    Aargh. wrote:
    Although I hope you're not passively-aggressively suggesting that those figures are likely to have increased by 35%+ of the total welfare budget in the last 2.5 years.
    That is a possibility, due to the lack of full time work available to people today. Remember we are in a double dipped recession.

    Edited by Moot_Point at 23:09:06 11-10-2012
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:12:13
    Yeah, it's rocketed up from 7.7% to 8%.

    Given all the stats are 2 clicks away, why not bother looking at them before making them up?
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:13:41
    darkmorgado wrote:
    Hmmm. Fair enough (assuming that's still accurate).

    It's still the single-most expensive benefit though.
    At 16.24% of the total.
  • faux-C 11 Oct 2012 23:24:03 11,204 posts
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    Since the Tories came back into power 93% of new housing benefit claims have come from people in employment, and yet they still bang on about scroungers and fail to acknowledge that it's their own policies of driving down wages and refusing to act on pulling the plug on the ridiculously inflated housing market that is causing the increase.

    It's a complete joke that policy is decided by the need to maintain the value of equity invested in property at the expense of making sure people actually have somewhere to live.
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:34:12
    The total housing benefit bill also doubled between 2007 and 2010 under labour
  • Khanivor 11 Oct 2012 23:35:33 43,369 posts
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    Lots of that was no doubt due to the economy tanking though.
  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 23:36:29 30,994 posts
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    And the financial collapse and recession started in 2008, before we finally came out of it in 2010 (IIRC).

    So we don't know if going back into recession has had a similar effect given the lack of current data.
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:36:43
    Post deleted
  • spamdangled 11 Oct 2012 23:37:29 30,994 posts
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    Fixed
  • Deleted user 11 October 2012 23:37:57
    Correct. Sorry, I'm not sure what the point you're making is.
  • Moot_Point 11 Oct 2012 23:38:35 5,530 posts
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    Tories love to fudge!
  • superdelphinus 11 Oct 2012 23:53:01 9,463 posts
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    this is a party conference, anything said or done has little to no correlation to what is actually happening. seems to me he's just been getting the right wing onboard for a bit
  • Clive_Dunn 12 Oct 2012 06:29:34 4,862 posts
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    Bring back council houses.
  • spamdangled 12 Oct 2012 12:49:34 30,994 posts
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    "Plebgate" rumbles on
  • Deleted user 12 October 2012 13:00:58
    What an incredibly pathetic 'story'.
  • Deleted user 12 October 2012 13:17:54
    There surely has to be a mechanism for under 25s who have come from abusive backgrounds to get housing benefit?
  • Deleted user 12 October 2012 13:58:20
    Aargh. wrote:
    What an incredibly pathetic 'story'.
    Alone it is, but is sort of feeds into the 'us and them' thing which has been ongoing since George Osbornes 'plan A' was introduced. It also serves to undermine Camerons weak 'we're all in this together' line.

    I'll all for seeing arrogant, nasty cunts pushed off the pedestals they work so hard to climb onto, so I hope this runs and pushes this particular cunt off his prize pedestal.
  • Deleted user 12 October 2012 14:01:48
    If he gets sacked for that then it'll just confirm what a joke politics and the media are.
  • rudedudejude 12 Oct 2012 14:32:48 2,342 posts
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    Sure get annoyed at the stupid story, but it's the shitty media outlets that are choosing to give it so much exposure for no reason at all. God knows why or even what agenda they are following by giving non-stories that get people annoyed about politicians so much airtime.
  • disusedgenius 12 Oct 2012 14:47:54 8,537 posts
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    It was fine as a story when it actually happened. Seems more than a little drawn out now and just has that bloodlust feel about it.
  • Tom_Servo 15 Oct 2012 13:59:33 18,079 posts
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    The Scottish independence referendum is on

    The agreement, struck in Edinburgh, has paved the way for a vote in autumn 2014, with a single Yes/No question on Scotland leaving the UK.

    It will also allow 16 and 17-year-olds to take part in the ballot.


    Guess I'm going to have to finally decide how I feel about independence, then. I really don't know about the economics of it but - and I think I've said this before - I think you could make a decent argument that the political culture is different enough to justify Scotland being an independent country. This, for example.

    The economic factors have to take precedence though. Not much point in being independent if we end up bust in 5-10 years. I thought a "devo max" option would be on the referendum, actually. Quite surprised it isn't.
  • Deleted user 15 October 2012 14:02:31
    Political devolution isn't the whole picture either: political culture at the moment is always in relation to England/UK, and reacts/acts accordingly. If I were Scottish I think I'd be considering the cultural and emotional feel of it as much as anything.

    As an English Brit, I'd be sad if Scotland left the union. Why? I don't know.

    I don't really think it'd change that much for most people, other than intangible pride/loss. Unless the economics fucks up.
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