Random science stories that don't warrant their own threads thread Page 2

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  • localnotail 30 Sep 2010 15:24:56 23,093 posts
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    mcmonkeyplc wrote:
    You cant call a fucking planet Douglas!


    Can so. It's my planet and I'll call it what I want. And I am naming it after the person who first interested me in space travel, the late great Douglas Adams.

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • ecu 30 Sep 2010 15:25:39 77,029 posts
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    It's already (unofficially) called Zarmina.
  • mcmonkeyplc 30 Sep 2010 15:27:04 39,467 posts
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    In that case it's got to be Gene Roddenberry or my cousin who introduced me to his work.

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • mcmonkeyplc 30 Sep 2010 15:27:45 39,467 posts
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    ecureuil wrote:
    It's already (unofficially) called Zarmina.

    You have no naming rights, you dont even consider it important.

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • ecu 30 Sep 2010 15:28:20 77,029 posts
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    I didn't name it that. :p The guy that discovered it has named it that. Go discover your own planet!
  • localnotail 30 Sep 2010 15:32:53 23,093 posts
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    ecureuil wrote:
    It's already (unofficially) called Zarmina.

    psh, details.

    /starts packing for first contact with planet Douglas.

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • phAge 30 Sep 2010 16:03:57 24,386 posts
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    ecureuil wrote:
    Gliese 581g is the first world discovered beyond Earth that's the right size and location for life.

    "Personally, given the ubiquity and propensity of life to flourish wherever it can, I would say that the chances for life on this planet are 100 percent. I have almost no doubt about it,"
    Hmm.
  • MetalDog 30 Sep 2010 16:10:51 23,740 posts
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    Personally, I'd call it 'Sagan'.

    Or 'Mister Swishy' depending on my mood.

    -- boobs do nothing for me, I want moustaches and chest hair.

  • grey_matters 30 Sep 2010 16:16:58 3,799 posts
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    Foundation?
  • localnotail 30 Sep 2010 16:19:29 23,093 posts
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    MetalDog wrote:
    Personally, I'd call it 'Sagan'.

    Or 'Mister Swishy' depending on my mood.

    I considered Sagan, but I wanted to keep it British. And I miss Douglas Adams.

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • mcmonkeyplc 30 Sep 2010 16:27:40 39,467 posts
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    Adam Smith

    /voms

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • stephenb 30 Sep 2010 16:31:59 2,752 posts
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    I would say that the chances for life on this planet are 100 percent. I have almost no doubt about it," Steven Vogt, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at University of California Santa Cruz

    How very unscientific for a scientist!

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • localnotail 30 Sep 2010 16:41:09 23,093 posts
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    mcmonkeyplc wrote:
    Adam Smith

    /voms

    He's already got an Institute, he can't have a planet as well. and he was Scottish, we can't give him a planet, he'd only deep fry it

    A strange game. The only winning move is not to play.

  • Deleted user 30 September 2010 16:43:11
    What an exciting discovery. How was it detected? Using the old star wobble or star dimming? Or was it with this new technique where they block out the stars light?
  • LeoliansBro 30 Sep 2010 16:59:10 44,512 posts
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    So, call it Remus then.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • stephenb 30 Sep 2010 17:00:45 2,752 posts
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    sven_vath wrote:
    it doesn't spin like the earth. one half is always sunny, the other is always dark and cold. thought spinnage was essential for a planet.


    random thought... why does it get darker the closer you get to the sun? that's quite mad.

    I don't think a planet cares about spinnage tbh, life might but not the planet. I don't understand your random thought.

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • Bremenacht 30 Sep 2010 17:04:06 18,748 posts
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    I think he meant for life. It might not have a strong magnetic field, shielding the surface.
  • RyanDS 30 Sep 2010 17:05:48 9,593 posts
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    Bremenacht wrote:
    I think he meant for life. It might not have a strong magnetic field, shielding the surface.

    No spin would also mean massive temperature differentials between the light / dark sides of the planet, with insane hurricanesbeing generated I would imagine.
  • Deleted user 30 September 2010 17:06:31
    The star is a red dwarf, so perhaps the radiation level is different, and who knows what else could be going on which could assist the development of life. I would imagine that the unique circumstances which led to life on our world are only a fraction of what is possible in the entire, f-ing huge universe.

    20 light years is bloody close to us also. Relatively.
  • stephenb 30 Sep 2010 17:08:09 2,752 posts
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    Yeah it's going to be a pretty harsh place. Battered by the solar wind. More importantly without a spin the atmosphere and water would pool at the poles.

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • mcmonkeyplc 30 Sep 2010 17:09:09 39,467 posts
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    Leolian'sBro wrote:
    So, call it Remus then.

    /JIZZ!

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • grey_matters 30 Sep 2010 17:12:12 3,799 posts
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    sven_vath wrote:
    blast off in a space ship from sunny florida. leave earth and it becomes dark even though you are getting closer to the sun.

    atmosphere must be like a prism or something that glows when hit with sun beams and encapsulates us in light.
    It doesn't get darker, as such. Things seem bright on earth because of all the light reflecting off things. Your space ship would be very bright if you were outside it.
  • phAge 30 Sep 2010 17:13:26 24,386 posts
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    Rage_Quit_Rob wrote:
    The star is a red dwarf, so perhaps the radiation level is different, and who knows what else could be going on which could assist the development of life. I would imagine that the unique circumstances which led to life on our world are only a fraction of what is possible in the entire, f-ing huge universe.

    20 light years is bloody close to us also. Relatively.
    "Relatively" being the operative word. Even at 10% the speed of light (an absolutely insane speed by todays, tomorrows and the foreseeable future's speeds) it'd take you a 200+ years to get there (got to accelerate and deccelerate too).
  • mcmonkeyplc 30 Sep 2010 17:14:01 39,467 posts
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    stephenb wrote:
    Yeah it's going to be a pretty harsh place. Battered by the solar wind. More importantly without a spin the atmosphere and water would pool at the poles.


    Why? Also doesn't our rotating core provide us with the magnetic field not our spin?

    Come and get it cumslingers!

  • stephenb 30 Sep 2010 17:14:53 2,752 posts
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    Next generation of telescopes please! We need to see this mother. I think it should be named LV-426.

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • Deleted user 30 September 2010 17:17:10
    phAge wrote:
    Rage_Quit_Rob wrote:
    The star is a red dwarf, so perhaps the radiation level is different, and who knows what else could be going on which could assist the development of life. I would imagine that the unique circumstances which led to life on our world are only a fraction of what is possible in the entire, f-ing huge universe.

    20 light years is bloody close to us also. Relatively.
    "Relatively" being the operative word. Even at 10% the speed of light (an absolutely insane speed by todays, tomorrows and the foreseeable future's speeds) it'd take you a 200+ years to get there (got to accelerate and deccelerate too).

    Its only 120 trillion miles away!

    Completely correct as you are (the chances of us ever being able to traverse such distances are slim), I just find it interesting that rocky planets could be extremely frequent. This could open the floodgates. If they can detect signs of life through chemical analysis of the atmosphere of such planets, then I would consider it a major scientific achievement. Even if sadly we could never see it.
  • stephenb 30 Sep 2010 17:20:42 2,752 posts
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    mcmonkeyplc wrote:
    stephenb wrote:
    Yeah it's going to be a pretty harsh place. Battered by the solar wind. More importantly without a spin the atmosphere and water would pool at the poles.


    Why? Also doesn't our rotating core provide us with the magnetic field not our spin?


    If the planet isn't spinning it's very likely it's core isn't either. It may very well be molten and active but not necessarily generating a field.

    Sorry my post is obviously completely speculative but on re reading it comes across as though I have all ready been there :) That was not my intention.

    However if there is liquid water and the planet isn't spinning you are going to have two big fuck off oceans at it's north and south poles.

    PSN : v--WEDGE--v

  • grey_matters 30 Sep 2010 17:21:33 3,799 posts
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    phAge wrote:
    Rage_Quit_Rob wrote:
    The star is a red dwarf, so perhaps the radiation level is different, and who knows what else could be going on which could assist the development of life. I would imagine that the unique circumstances which led to life on our world are only a fraction of what is possible in the entire, f-ing huge universe.

    20 light years is bloody close to us also. Relatively.
    "Relatively" being the operative word. Even at 10% the speed of light (an absolutely insane speed by todays, tomorrows and the foreseeable future's speeds) it'd take you a 200+ years to get there (got to accelerate and deccelerate too).
    Only to find an established human colony there already due to the invention of navigable wormholes 175 years after you left.
    :(
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