Rate the last book you read Page 28

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  • Murbal 19 Nov 2012 11:24:46 22,070 posts
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    phAge wrote:
    Loved the bejesus out of PSS - one of those books I never wanted to end because the setting was at least as captivating as the story. Good thing it was bloody long. ;)
    Indeed. It's up there with some of the best stuff I've ever read.
  • senso-ji 19 Nov 2012 11:38:56 5,848 posts
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    A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking - 8/10

    I'm not going to pretend I completely understood all of this, but, after re-reading each chapter about 2-3 times, I did pick up some interesting theories and ideas about the Universe and Black holes. Strangely, I found the scientific subjects related to Hawking's main theories (thermodynamics, Quantum mechanics, Relativity and the uncertainty principle) to more interesting than Black holes and whether the Universe is infinite or not.

    Will definitely look to reading more physics books in the future; I hear Richard Feynman wrote some good ones.
  • glaeken 21 Nov 2012 14:38:16 11,136 posts
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    A Clergyman's Daughter by George Orwell - This is always said to be one of Orwell's weaker books but I still enjoyed it. Orwell's writing is as great as ever and some of the depictions of living in poverty in the 1930's were very reminiscent of Down and out in Paris and London. The story follows a Clergyman’s daughter who wakes up in London having lost their memory of who they are. We then follow their attempts to survive with no home or income.

    It might be a weaker Orwell book but it’s still a good read.
  • RyanDS 21 Nov 2012 14:50:04 9,198 posts
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    senso-ji wrote:
    A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking - 8/10

    I'm not going to pretend I completely understood all of this, but, after re-reading each chapter about 2-3 times, I did pick up some interesting theories and ideas about the Universe and Black holes. Strangely, I found the scientific subjects related to Hawking's main theories (thermodynamics, Quantum mechanics, Relativity and the uncertainty principle) to more interesting than Black holes and whether the Universe is infinite or not.

    Will definitely look to reading more physics books in the future; I hear Richard Feynman wrote some good ones.
    I reccomend Bill Brysons History of Everything as a follow up. Goes through a huge raft of science areas. Doesn't go into much detail, and occasionally he puts theories forward as facts, but generally it's a great read and a great intro to a lot of disciplines.
  • jampar 21 Nov 2012 16:24:34 59 posts
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    The Fear Index - Robert Harris.

    Despite mixed reviews, i enjoyed this. 7/10. intriguing take on how technology might get too advanced...
  • TechnoHippy 21 Nov 2012 19:56:42 14,707 posts
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    RyanDS wrote:
    senso-ji wrote:
    A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking - 8/10

    I'm not going to pretend I completely understood all of this, but, after re-reading each chapter about 2-3 times, I did pick up some interesting theories and ideas about the Universe and Black holes. Strangely, I found the scientific subjects related to Hawking's main theories (thermodynamics, Quantum mechanics, Relativity and the uncertainty principle) to more interesting than Black holes and whether the Universe is infinite or not.

    Will definitely look to reading more physics books in the future; I hear Richard Feynman wrote some good ones.
    I reccomend Bill Brysons History of Everything as a follow up. Goes through a huge raft of science areas. Doesn't go into much detail, and occasionally he puts theories forward as facts, but generally it's a great read and a great intro to a lot of disciplines.
    I second this emotion.

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  • jagg3r 21 Nov 2012 21:16:45 1,030 posts
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    quadfather wrote:
    Just read the 4 Saxon trilogy books by Bernard Cornell after reading the initial 3 Arthur-y ones. Great stuff - 9/10

    Moved onto The Blade Itself by Jo Abercrombie. about 30% in - brilliant so far
    About 100 pages into The blade itself and im really enjoying it, i also bought the 1st book of the Saxon series which im looking forward to. I started out reading Gemmel, George rr martin then Steven erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series,Which is a brilliant read,but since I started reading the blacklibrarys Horus heresy series iv'e not read much else in years. I never read any warhammer stuff previous to this but for those who haven't read the Horus heresy series I highly recommend it. Its the ultimate story of betrayal, when brothers fight brothers and start a war that spans the universe, Epic reading. The last 7 or 8 books have all been Ny times bestsellers and its written by a few authors, check it out.
  • darkengy 22 Nov 2012 04:02:46 98 posts
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    Read Rick Riordan's "The Lightning Thief"

    9/10

    It's more awesome than the crappy movie. I get to laugh at some puns & dialogues. I also like the way he intertwines mythology & reality

  • TechnoHippy 23 Nov 2012 11:09:00 14,707 posts
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    Creed by James Herbert

    While far from his best, it's still a good read. The character himself is very unlikable, but that's part of the fun :-)

    6/10

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  • senso-ji 28 Nov 2012 18:04:24 5,848 posts
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    Jamrach's Menagerie by Carol Birch

    This was shortlisted for the Booker prize this year, but I was underwhelmed by it. It's essentially a fictional account based on a true story, with a Dickensian inspired beginning that read like two unfinished books glued together. The ending (last 50 pages) felt like it was tacked on to appease the publishers; it certainly didn't provide adequate closure to the characters' ordeals.

    Pluses: it's an easy read, has a very powerful last third and has inspired me to read the true story it's based on.

    6/10
  • darkengy 29 Nov 2012 06:58:01 98 posts
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    The Titan's Curse - Rick Riordan

    8/10

    I just can't unhook myself with his series. It's simply fascinating on the way the author intertwines mythology with this era

  • Wacko_AK 29 Nov 2012 08:28:15 182 posts
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    The Great North Road by Peter F Hamilton

    9/10


    After finishing The Night's Dawn Trilogy I'd vowed never to read another one of his books again! When this popped up on the kindle version for only £2.40 I gave it a go. I'm glad I did - thoroughly entertaining near future romp. Still has a few of the trademark Hamilton "every woman is a super model" but it does not get in the way.

    There were some really good characters and the plot zipped along nicely with a few twists that I did not see coming.

    I liked how he described Newcastle's weather without going into detail about how the climate changed, that was a nice touch


    There is definite potential for a follow up.
  • Vortex808 1 Dec 2012 10:39:35 7,060 posts
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    Irvine Welsh's Skagboys.

    A bloated book, that I pretty much had to force myself to finish. As a prequel to Trainspotting this is effectively the literary equivalent of George Lucas' star wars prequels. If not quite that bad.

    Some of it was ok and it produced a few laughs, but a lot really needed cut and fine-tuned further imo.
  • TechnoHippy 2 Dec 2012 10:39:56 14,707 posts
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    Sword Of God by Chris Kuzneski /b]

    Sword of God starts well and continues to build momentum throughout the story. It's written in an open style that makes it easy to read. It's a little predictable and I think the author could have developed the mystery and the back story a bit more. That being said it was an enjoyable read.

    6/10

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  • ZuluHero 2 Dec 2012 11:22:35 4,099 posts
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    Bitterblue - kristen cashore.

    It's my guilty bath time secret. Graceling was great, Fire was good, but Bitterblue was a bit of a let down, and didn't really go anywhere.

    3/10

    Velocity - dean koontz

    Fast paced book, read it in 3 days, lots of twists and turns and good ending.

    8/10


    I read a lot of trash :)
  • TechnoHippy 8 Dec 2012 11:17:54 14,707 posts
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    Aliens Cauldron by Diane Carey

    It takes a while to get going, but once it does the story is interesting, although not quite the horror or action I'd expect for an Aliens novel. Still it's not a bad read and there are a few interesting thoughts about the Aliens.

    5/10

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  • sirtacos 10 Dec 2012 03:20:19 7,273 posts
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    Ender's Game

    The prose is workmanlike (unspectacular, economical, occasionally a bit crap), as are the characters and the plot... but whole > sum of parts. I found myself devouring most of it.

    7/10

    Edited by sirtacos at 03:20:46 10-12-2012
  • dr_swin 10 Dec 2012 08:04:49 4,887 posts
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    For Whom The Bell Tolls

    A brilliant war novel. I particularly liked his way of describing the love scenes. Narratively speaking, not a great deal happens, but it remains entertaining and engaging nonetheless. The novel does a superb job in conveying what it must feel like to be sent on a mission where you know it is unlikely that you will return from it.

    9/10
  • senso-ji 10 Dec 2012 10:23:23 5,848 posts
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    The Heroes by Joe Abercrombie

    Been meaning to read something by Abercrombie for a while and I happened to find a copy of this in my library. All in all it was enjoyable, with good characters and well written fight scenes. I don't read much epic fantasy, (David Gemmell being one of the few I've read) but it was refreshing to see Abercrombie writing his protagonists as cynical, cowardly and back stabbing in contrast to the more chivalrous Gemmell ones. I still prefer Gemmell's prose, though.

    I did feel that it was a little too long; the cast was huge, and he should have trimmed the number of protagonists down and dedicated more time developing the main ones.

    Note: I learned after finished reading this that, although this is a stand alone story, it's set in the same world as the previous novels, and features established characters from them. This didn't effect the coherency of the story, but it's possibly best to advise people read the first law trilogy before reading this.

    7/10
  • JoeBlade 10 Dec 2012 20:56:38 2,522 posts
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    Metro 2033 (I won't risk butchering the author's name so look it up yourself if you want to know :p)

    What starts out as a seemingly straightforward adventure in the post-apocalytic Moskow metro for protagonist Artyom gradually turns into an oddysey spanning the underground complex. Littered with strange individuals, bands of people of wildly varying beliefs and ideologies, as well as grotesque and threatening creatures the metro is a very dangerous, dark - in all senses of the word - but intriguing place.

    Metro 2033 is a mix of horror and adventure with elements of sci-fi and other genres thrown in. The amount of philosophical musings are particularly noteworthy.
    There is, however, surprisingly little humour and no romance whatsoever. Not that it needed those but a western author would probably have felt almost obliged to shoehorn them in so it's an interesting change to say the least.

    While the story is quite thrilling the writing is a bit odd. I'm unsure whether it's due to the translation or once again cultural differences but the style and the dialog in particular struck me as very strange in places.

    All in all a definite fun read I'd most assuredly recommend to everyone interested in post-apocalyptic stories.

    If you insist on numbers I'd say, um, 7-ish?
  • Sarahshade 10 Dec 2012 20:59:01 139 posts
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    The last book I read was the Assassins Apprentice which was pretty good, nice light hearted fantasy book!

    Xbox gamertag: Sarah Doherty22
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  • PazJohnMitch 12 Dec 2012 01:22:07 7,988 posts
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    The next one is much better. (However not as good as the first 3).
  • darkengy 13 Dec 2012 07:12:56 98 posts
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    Finished the first Percy Jackson & the Olympians series by Rick Riordan.
    Some parts were predictable but I find the author's way of intertwining mythology & fiction awesome
    10/10

  • senso-ji 15 Dec 2012 17:10:00 5,848 posts
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    Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut

    I wanted to read something much shorter and more direct than the last 600+ page novel I read; and this didn't disappoint. The writing style is punchy and lends itself brilliantly to the themes explored in the story. If you enjoyed Catch 22 then this is it's natural, equally twisted companion.

    9/10

    Edited by senso-ji at 15:23:47 18-12-2012
  • Tom_Servo 15 Dec 2012 17:16:31 17,496 posts
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    senso: The part about the war in reverse is probably one of my favourite passages in literature. Wonderful.

    Been reading quite a bit recently, but I think the best thing has been Borges' Fictions. Truly brilliant short story collection and even the couple that aren't amazing are still good.
  • senso-ji 22 Dec 2012 16:33:28 5,848 posts
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    The Finkler Question by Howard Jacobson

    Jacobson's admirable language and flowing prose get's ruined by a boring plot and detestable characters. No story threads are ever resolved, and it's hard to associate with wealthy, self centred protagonists. A disappointment from a writer who can do so much better.

    5/10
  • senso-ji 28 Dec 2012 23:56:01 5,848 posts
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    Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

    This was a strange one. I wasn't enjoying this sentimental journey through an old man's life for the first half, but it grew on me and I appreciated the book's portrayal of dignity in society by the end. The prose can be hit and miss at times, but all in all it's recommended if you enjoy books like 'The Remains of the Day'.

    7/10
  • Deleted user 29 December 2012 03:40:41
    Dune 7/10
    Good but not that good

    Hellstroms Hive 9/10
    ALthough its an old book its such a good sci-fi read

    Cloud ATlas 9/10
    Really enjoyed it, although most of my friends who have read it hated it.

    Gears of War: Aspho Fields 7/10
    Good action fodder
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