Rate the last book you read Page 73

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  • Greggy_wocky 16 Jun 2017 00:53:08 56 posts
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    Post-apocalypse fans should check out The Passage trilogy by Justin Cronin, if you haven't already. (I'm at the end of the first).

    And - all the Bosch novels by Michael Connelly.

    And the Parker novels by Richard Stark, if you want a genuine anti-hero.

    Finally - The Three Body Problem trilogy by Cixin Lui is the best sf I've read for years.

    Edited by Greggy_wocky at 00:57:46 16-06-2017
  • Khanivor 16 Jun 2017 02:10:55 43,423 posts
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    Justin Cronin wrote a wonderful book called The Summer Guest. SFA to do with the apocalypse I found it one of the most pleasant reads I've had in years.

    Bosch is indeed awesome. As is the TV show.
  • Khanivor 16 Jun 2017 02:16:16 43,423 posts
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    Read a good apocalyptic book recently - The Reset by Daniel Powell. It's got an interestingly different mechanism for the fall while also managing to not be an exercise in bleakness.
  • Greggy_wocky 16 Jun 2017 05:55:13 56 posts
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    Post deleted
  • drhcnip 16 Jun 2017 06:33:22 5,405 posts
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    Daddy-Doom-Bar wrote:


    The Stand - Stephen King. 8/10
    Think it would make a good film, too.

    i believe a new one is currently in the works but this, though dated in some places now, has its moments...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stand_(miniseries)
  • Mekanik 16 Jun 2017 08:42:59 4,667 posts
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    Had a long trip offshore so read a couple books during the boring time.

    Hyperion + Fall of Hyperion - Dan Simmons. Fantastic books. Great story throughout. Ordered up the next 2 in the same series. Looking forward to these.

    The Hydrogen Sonata - Ian M Banks. Found this in a shop and was pleased that I hadnt read all his books. Another cracking Culture novel. Might have to go back and read them all again at some point.

    Started/third of the way through Seveneves - Neal Stephenson. Pretty good so far. Nice themes but so far doesnt seem as philosophical as a lot of his other books
  • Daddy-Doom-Bar 16 Jun 2017 20:04:22 2,872 posts
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    @Mola_Ram Ha ha! Very good. Most appropriate.
    Basically the books were a massive slog. Overblown self indulgent messes, mostly. Started off well but went downhill after book 3.
  • rice_sandwich 19 Jun 2017 12:27:10 3,437 posts
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    The Hidden Life of Trees - Peter Wohlleben

    A great book about trees and forests that explains all about what goes on above and below ground in forests. It has lots of short chapters so it's good to dip in and out of. Turns out there's a lot more going on with forests than you'd think. It's a German book translated into English so there's the occasional odd phrase here and there but for the most part it reads well.

    9/10
  • rice_sandwich 21 Jun 2017 08:58:55 3,437 posts
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    An Account of the Decline of the Great Auk, According to One Who Saw It - Jessie Greengrass

    A collection of 12 short stories covering a wide range of topics from the titled decline of the great auk, vaguely supernatural happenings and several well observed slice of life tales. I'd say ten of the 12 are very good. The stand out story is 'The Politics of Minor Resistance' which tells of how a call centre worker manages to survive the daily grind. 8/10
  • Tonka 29 Jun 2017 06:58:51 26,628 posts
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    I've been struggling with Too like the lightning for over a month and half. Only reason I'm still reading it is so that I can write a scathing review.

    It's one of the worst books I've read in ... well ever.

    The setting is cool though. A future utopia where everyone seems to be doing what they love rather than being wage slaves. Free flying cars can take you anywhere on earth in less than two hours.

    But it's told by a narrator who fucking sucks at narrating and who tries to be cute and who has the most unlikely of positions where e is a condemned criminal AND manages to be friends with ALL the most powerful people on earth at the same time. Criminals arn't incarcerated but stripped of benefits and have to dress in a special uniform and are slaves for anyone basically.

    So this guy is called by every leader all the time and get to sit in on secret meetings and it's never explained why. Not really. Once they say something about him having the best analytical mind on the planet. I guess AI research didn't go that well in this world...


    Avoid this shit. I think It'll make my very short list of books I've given up on (Ulysses by James Joyce at the top)

    Too like the lightning my ass. Too much like pure crap more like.
  • Malek86 8 Jul 2017 12:42:39 6,453 posts
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    I've just started reading Exercises in Style, by Raymond Queneau. Four pages in, and it's already amazing.

    (probably helps that it was translated into italian by Umberto Eco)
  • Daddy-Doom-Bar 9 Jul 2017 00:31:28 2,872 posts
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    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind.
    Really enjoyed this. A bit bleak and really doesn't have much good to say, but then I've never been particularly proud to be a human anyway.

    Contact by Carl Sagan.
    Enjoyed this, too. Goes off on tangents every now and then, but very believable. Loved the end stuff about Pi. Re-watched the film after. Its not so good. Does an alright job, but skips the best bit - the decoding - and rushes through the journey. Wish they'd been a bit more loyal to the source and done a TV mini series or something. Really put a lump in my throat when it was dedicated to Carl. Wish I'd been old enough to have appreciated him whilst he was alive.

    Pale Blue Dot by Carl Sagan
    Dated but worth a read. Shame the audio book version was read mainly by Ann Druyan as i'm not a fan of her audio stuff.

    Edited by Daddy-Doom-Bar at 00:33:23 09-07-2017
  • GuybrushThreepwood 9 Jul 2017 07:17:32 1,383 posts
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    Wizard's First Rule - Terry Goodkind.

    First in the Sword of Truth series. I read it years ago but as he was still writing the series at the time, i never finished it. Found I could hardly remember any of it.

    It was a lot more "adult" than i remember, with child rape and torture among the lowlights. The main characters were amazingly dense at times and failed to spot the bleeding obvious too many times. The writing struggled a bit at times too.

    That said, it kept my attention and i finished it and enjoyed the ending and most of the journey. Not a classic, but not a bad fantasy book. I wouldn't recommend it to people I know because of the adult nature, which I don't think was needed, but then Game of Thrones wasn't my kind of thing for that reason either.
  • GuybrushThreepwood 19 Jul 2017 12:37:14 1,383 posts
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    Stone of Tears - Terry Goodkind

    Second in the above series. I could equally not remember anything about it and the vague ideas I had turned out to be wrong. Less torture and no child abuse and a lot more magic and mayhem which I enjoyed more. It was one of those books that swapped from group to group after a couple of chapters which I got a bit sick of, but it just about worked.

    His writing has improved, but still a little rough in places and his recaps for the sake of people who had to wait a year between books originally were a bit annoying when you'd finished the previous book a week ago.

    Obviously I enjoyed it or I'd not have finished it so quickly. Had too many late nights reading my kindle recently for sure. I'm already 4 chapters into the next book. I actually ended up in tears at one point at the end of the book and in another part in a cave, I was so affected that my pulse rocketed and I had to put the book down. So, pretty powerful stuff all in all... or maybe I'm a bit of a wuss... probably the latter.

    Seems like he's written about a dozen books in the series now, so a couple more and I should be into ones I've never read. Hopefully they won't go all wheel of time on me.
  • GuybrushThreepwood 21 Jul 2017 09:03:53 1,383 posts
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    Blood of the Fold - Terry Goodkind

    Pretty poor. His constant repetition of what's gone before has got to seriously annoying levels. Every few pages now he's recapping people's motives, so I'm just skipping that. I've also (mercifully) got sickened by the perversion. There's only so many rapes and tortures that I can read about without getting repulsed by it. It seems that every woman in the book has been raped or tortured or both... and then killed.

    I got most of the way through the book until it took another sick turn and then thought "wtf am I reading here?" and put it aside. I've read up on the rest of the series and it seems the first two are the best by far and then he goes all Robert Jordan and has pages and pages of the lead character making speeches which reflect the author's political beliefs. It seems the torture and rape never ends with "the bad guys" becoming increasingly depraved as they are depicted as ever more evil. Obviously evil equals rape, so they all rape.

    I got to book 5 or 6 as a much younger guy and then realised sod all was happening for hundreds of pages and the plot was getting thinner and thinner. At least the older me has managed to improve my tastes.

    The author sounds like a right tosser too, which never makes me feel like reading what they've written.
  • DamoVotf 21 Jul 2017 09:47:17 1,229 posts
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    Guybrush that series just gets worse and worse. First few are great.

    But I found it just became more and more tedious.

    Though it is years since I read it.

    At least Robert Jordan gets redeemed by the last 3 books and Memory of Light is a fantastic finish to that series.

    Edited by DamoVotf at 09:49:02 21-07-2017
  • DamoVotf 21 Jul 2017 09:51:26 1,229 posts
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    Daddy-Doom-Bar wrote:
    Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind.
    Really enjoyed this. A bit bleak and really doesn't have much good to say, but then I've never been particularly proud to be a human anyway.
    This book is brilliant, am currently reading its follow up which is interesting but not quite as good.

    Thoroughly recommend this for anyone remotely interested in the human conditions.
  • brokenkey 21 Jul 2017 09:54:10 9,136 posts
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    John Dies at the End by David Wong, and its sequel This Book is Full of Spiders. Both worth a read if you like lovecraftian comedy.
  • Tonka 21 Jul 2017 10:00:38 26,628 posts
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    @brokenkey didn't know there was a book.
    The film is good fun.
  • boo 21 Jul 2017 17:00:32 13,359 posts
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    Read 'The Colour of Magic' by Terry Pratchett about 20 years ago and thought it was absolute crap. In the intervening period he'd clearly produced a lot more work, and many people seemed to like it, so when I was on holiday and saw a second hand copy going cheap I thought I'd give it a second chance.

    Got 75 pages in and realised I'd been right the first time.

    Pratchett seemed to think that 'wacky = funny', and he was about as wrong as wrong could be.

    It sucked like an industrial vacuum cleaner.
  • boo 21 Jul 2017 17:01:49 13,359 posts
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    brokenkey wrote:
    John Dies at the End by David Wong, and its sequel This Book is Full of Spiders. Both worth a read if you like lovecraftian comedy.
    Have read the first one - never was the description 'batshit mental' more appropriate. Written as a blog, and boy does it show. Worth a read though.

    Have 'Spiders' on the shelf waiting its turn.
  • andytheadequate 21 Jul 2017 17:18:45 8,979 posts
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    boo wrote:
    Read 'The Colour of Magic' by Terry Pratchett about 20 years ago and thought it was absolute crap. In the intervening period he'd clearly produced a lot more work, and many people seemed to like it, so when I was on holiday and saw a second hand copy going cheap I thought I'd give it a second chance.

    Got 75 pages in and realised I'd been right the first time.

    Pratchett seemed to think that 'wacky = funny', and he was about as wrong as wrong could be.

    It sucked like an industrial vacuum cleaner.
    It was his first Discworld book, the later ones get a million times better, and funnier.
  • GuybrushThreepwood 21 Jul 2017 17:21:26 1,383 posts
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    @boo As Andy says, the first couple are not good in retrospect. I enjoyed them at the time, but not on a recent re-read. His later stuff is worth a look (Guards Guards etc), but avoid the first two for sure.
  • mal 21 Jul 2017 17:40:20 28,662 posts
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    When did it get good I wonder? Mort's often well remembered, and that's book 4. I've not read Equal Rites (book 3) in a long time, though I recall Wyrd Sisters (book 6) being the better witches book even back then. Pyramids (book 7) was the latest when I started reading, and Guards! Guards! (book 8) did blow my tiny little mind back then when it came out.
  • Daddy-Doom-Bar 21 Jul 2017 17:44:57 2,872 posts
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    Mort's always been my favorite. But yeah his first few (not including Carpet People as I LOVE that book and its not a Discworld one anyway) weren't great.
    Any witches book is always great. Love granny weatherwax.
  • JoelStinty 24 Jul 2017 18:14:42 5,905 posts
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    The rider - Tim krabbe

    Superb. One of the best books i have ever read. A short novel about a Cylisct account of a road race he took part in, pretty much Kilometre by Kilometre. Which sounds boring, but Tim's Writing is superb and brings the race to life with some beautiful prose and some pretty funny cutting remarks about other riders and himself. Towards the end it can get a bit hallucinogenic - as he very much goes into the red - which can confuse some passages. But is a beautiful book about cycling, the human condition and pushing oneself to the very edge of what one can do.

    I know i liked it because i visualised making a film of it which i tend to do with books i really like.

    5/5

    Edited by JoelStinty at 20:32:22 24-07-2017
  • mal 24 Jul 2017 19:03:52 28,662 posts
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    So 'superb' is superbly written?

    Edit: Oh, I see you left the title in another thread. It's actually called 'The Rider' by 'Tim Krabbe'.

    Edited by mal at 19:05:17 24-07-2017
  • JoelStinty 24 Jul 2017 20:32:00 5,905 posts
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    Yeah... I better edit that. Haha
  • Dougs 27 Jul 2017 15:54:30 83,939 posts
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    The Humans, Matt Haig. 8/10. A lovely, funny and touching tale of humanity. With aliens and maths stuff and everything
  • StixxUK 27 Jul 2017 20:11:09 7,820 posts
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    Just read The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman.

    Really enjoyed it, I'd give it 4 stars. Wasn't quite sure if it was a kids book as it kind of felt like it, but had some borderline adult bits in. Pretty much read it cover to cover in one sitting while waiting for a plane, which is very unusual for me! Neil Gaiman is just brilliant though.
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