Rate the last book you read Page 38

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  • LeoliansBro 5 Sep 2013 09:53:18 43,199 posts
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    Tonka wrote:
    LeoliansBro wrote:
    Great world he's created, but the book itself ain't great at all. Feels a bit like wish fulfilment roleplay for him and his wife, and it is full of odd gaps.
    That's what I liked about it. All out feel good day dream.

    It's a multigenre meta genre I think and I like it. Just like "A world made by hand" or The Ember series (the latter being rather poor)
    Yes but you just know they go LARPing, and while that's fine I'd rather not read 700 pages about them slowly wanking each other off while pretending to be their cooler alter egos. 'My big strong man', 'she was thin and pretty', ' he was really handsome and had strong arms', 'she was actually a bit elvish and they are all gorgeous', 'he had dreamy eyes' ... and then they got married and then we can put that long bit you wrote about 15,000 dwarven walking about in formation. Snuggums.

    Vivid world though.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Tonka 5 Sep 2013 09:57:44 20,010 posts
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    They go far beyond LARPING aparently. He is in with Neal Stephenson and the whole "Let's rediscover sword fighting" crowd.

    Guess that help explain the detailed world.

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • LeoliansBro 5 Sep 2013 10:18:42 43,199 posts
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    Oh Lordy.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Alastair 5 Sep 2013 10:22:44 15,424 posts
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    I like a bit of old skool DnD, but LARPing is far too far over the line!!

    Not as nice as I used to be

  • LeoliansBro 5 Sep 2013 10:23:40 43,199 posts
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    I've got a live and let live viewpoint on LARPing. After all I love fancy dress parties.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • Tonka 5 Sep 2013 10:33:32 20,010 posts
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    I wish I could be arsed to take part in a LARP.

    Fucking shame Knights of Badassdome got eaten by a goblin.

    Or WAS IT?!

    Edited by Tonka at 10:35:37 05-09-2013

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • Trane 5 Sep 2013 22:59:17 4,050 posts
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    Hyperion

    First Sci-Fi read in a while, took me a while to engross myself in, but I think that's just because of the way it's laid out into several short stories. Some great concepts and some reasonably interesting characters, does seem to be more of a build up or scene setter for the follow up(s). On to a fantasy book now before I go for the sequel.

    8/10
  • CrispyLog 6 Sep 2013 00:31:42 114 posts
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    The Minotaur Takes A Cigarette Break

    Hard to rate really, though it is a very good book. It's pretty kitchen sink, just about some lonely chap (who happens to be a minotaur) going about his daily job and existence whilst being shy and self conscious about his differences to everyone else, yet strangely compelling due to the vivid writing. Probably settle on a safe Eurogamer 8/10.
  • Roddy100 6 Sep 2013 01:20:51 748 posts
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    I've recently discovered Joe Hill and have been reading some of his books back to back. He's much like his dad (Stephen King), only better in my opinion.

    20th Century Ghosts 8.5/10

    Horns 9/10

    NOS4R2 9/10
  • CrispyLog 6 Sep 2013 02:00:49 114 posts
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    Hold up, did I read that right? Stephen King's son is an author, and a better one than his dad? That is an interesting development.
  • Roddy100 6 Sep 2013 03:39:55 748 posts
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    Indeed, you read that right.
  • Deleted user 6 September 2013 04:21:07
    I wouldn't say he's a better writer (or storyteller, if you will) than his dad, but his stories are arguably more structured and solid. Especially the endings.

    But still, King has a good 40 years on top of him, craft-wise, and King's own writing didn't really tighten up until the mid 80s (and some would also argue after his car accident when he started slowing down). So he's definitely one to watch.
  • Phattso Moderator 6 Sep 2013 04:47:57 13,199 posts
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    I just read Pillars of the Earth, after being recommended it and told it was an amazing read.

    Erm... decent page turner, and I did blast through it in just a couple of evenings, but I was expecting something more from the way people had spoken about it.

    6/10
  • LeoliansBro 6 Sep 2013 08:53:06 43,199 posts
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    Picked up Horns on a recommendation here but I really didn't get on with it. Now you say it's Stephen King's son I'm amazed I didn't see that before, so obvious.

    LB, you really are a massive geek.

  • senso-ji 6 Sep 2013 13:49:16 5,790 posts
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    The Ice Princess by Camilla Lackberg

    Swedish crime thriller written by a someone who just finished a create writing course...and it shows. Boring plot, terrible placing, badly researched, unempathetic characters and cliches up the ass. At first, I was struggling to understand how Ms Lackberg sold so many novels, but after discovering her stories are a cross between EastEnders and Mid-Summer Murders, it's depressingly obvious how she's enjoyed so much success.

    4/10

    Edited by senso-ji at 13:49:30 06-09-2013
  • speedofthepuma 6 Sep 2013 14:19:54 13,266 posts
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    Enders game 7/10 - very easy to read, lovely way for me to get back into Sci fi after a break.
    Speaker for the dead 9/10 - fantastic sequel to the above, very different in tone.

    So frustrated that the others in the series aren't available in Kindle edition in Australia because of copy-write reasons.

    I've turned off all the avatars and crap, so don't expect me to be impressed by yours.

  • sirtacos 8 Sep 2013 07:21:04 7,267 posts
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    The Outsider / The Stranger

    Features one of the strangest protagonists I have ever seen.
    The novel begins with his mother's funeral. The guy continues to live his life.
    Then, as a result of some questionable choices, he is arrested for murder.
    As the Kafkaesque court proceedings unfold, it becomes obvious that the man is on trial for much more than murder: he stands accused of not playing 'the game'.
    What follows is the most sobering and powerful stuff I have read since finishing All The King's Men.
    I can finally see why Albert Camus gets such praise. The prose is straightforward, never verbose, and almost spartan. Brilliant.

    Edited by sirtacos at 08:08:37 08-09-2013
  • Tonka 8 Sep 2013 07:34:38 20,010 posts
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    @senso-ji if you would like to read some better Swedish crime fiction I recommend the author Johan Theorin. His first three books are set on the island where I grew up so I'm a bit biased,.

    Sort of mystery /crime / mild horror

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • RedSparrows 8 Sep 2013 22:59:34 21,992 posts
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    sirtacos wrote:
    The Outsider / The Stranger

    Features one of the strangest protagonists I have ever seen.
    The novel begins with his mother's funeral. The guy continues to live his life.
    Then, as a result of some questionable choices, he is arrested for murder.
    As the Kafkaesque court proceedings unfold, it becomes obvious that the man is on trial for much more than murder: he stands accused of not playing 'the game'.
    What follows is the most sobering and powerful stuff I have read since finishing All The King's Men.
    I can finally see why Albert Camus gets such praise. The prose is straightforward, never verbose, and almost spartan. Brilliant.
    Camus is fantastic. I've only read his journalism, and so must go into his fiction, but he's - I feel - sorely under-valued in certain English-speaking circles.
  • sirtacos 9 Sep 2013 07:09:12 7,267 posts
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    Where did you read his journalism? I want to check that out too.
  • RedSparrows 9 Sep 2013 09:48:59 21,992 posts
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    Other shops available

    It's pretty fiery, and will, I imagine, give you insight into his fiction, directly and indirectly. Like I said, I need to read that!
  • senso-ji 9 Sep 2013 13:27:22 5,790 posts
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    @sirtacos

    I read 'The Plague' a few months back and thought that was excellent. You should add that to your Camus list as well.
  • Metalfish 9 Sep 2013 14:20:20 8,785 posts
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    Carthage Must Be Destroyed by Richard Miles
    (Not to be confused with Destroy Carthage, the tie in with the latest total war game, which, if is anything like the game that spawned it, is probably missing some chapters that will be hastily pasted in later and is inexplicably missing the the letter g)

    I don't often read history, so I lack the ability to compare it to anything else, but I'd say it succeeds in its aims: I now know significantly more about ancient carthage than I did before. Or even more than anyone could conceivably make use of. It opens with the fall of the city (where Tunis, in North Africa is now) to the Roman onslaught. From then it's strictly linear and becomes increasingly framed in the context of Roman actions as their power grew.

    It plays plenty of attention to the religious and propaganda aspects and does a reasonably good job (I assume) of gleaning information from the biases contemporary accounts.

    6.423 tullips out of Spandeau ballet
  • sirtacos 10 Sep 2013 01:39:28 7,267 posts
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    @RedSparrows

    Thanks, I'll give it a read.

    senso-ji wrote:
    I read 'The Plague' a few months back and thought that was excellent. You should add that to your Camus list as well.
    Added to my list, cheers.
  • glaeken 11 Sep 2013 15:52:14 11,087 posts
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    The thin man by Dashiell Hammett - Quite a good read. I actually preferred it to the other Hammett books I have read as it's not quite so muddled a story. It's still a twisty turny affair but a little more focussed. It's funny reading it how obvious it is Hammett was an alcoholic. The main characters drink consumpition is off the chart but it's never really mentioned that the behaviour is a little odd to say the least. The guy does nothing but drink for the entire story. Any normal person would be pissed let alone working to solve a crime.

    Edited by glaeken at 15:56:42 11-09-2013
  • senso-ji 13 Sep 2013 18:01:59 5,790 posts
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    The Woman in Black by Susan Hill

    Suspense novel inspired by the Ghost stories of M R James and the Gothic novel. While the writing is competent and the story is a solid, if unoriginal one( with an interesting ending), I felt there wasn't enough substance to warrant anything other than a mediocre score.

    6/10
  • bitch_tits_zero_nine 13 Sep 2013 18:07:24 6,654 posts
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    went through a Camus phase. My favourite was one about a pilot that got downed in a desert. Think it was Camus anyway.
  • sirtacos 13 Sep 2013 18:07:32 7,267 posts
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    Movie's surprisingly good though. Despite Mr. Potter's lack of credibility as a middle-aged father.
  • senso-ji 20 Sep 2013 10:48:17 5,790 posts
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    Winter's Bone by Daniel Woodrell

    Suspense story set in the austere and malevolent hills of the Ozarks.

    The authour creates an incredibly vivid atmosphere of life in the hidden folds of America. Genuine characters, visceral imagery and a perfectly judged plot all wrapped up in laconic prose made this an excellent read.

    Highly recommended, especially if you enjoy the work of Cormac McCarthy.

    9/10
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