Rate the last book you read

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  • Tonka 21 Apr 2009 10:23:59 20,025 posts
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    The Brutal Art by Jesse Kellerman
    It spellbound me at the beginning. Then it became really slow and rather boring. Then it picked up near the end only to nosedive once more. The initial premise has a lot of potential. Then it gets lost in flashback and dull love stories.

    Dies the Fire by S. M. Stirling
    A post-apocalyptic tale with a heavy focus on medieval warfare. All technology is broken by some strange unexplained phenomenon. Even gunpowder and steam engines cease to function. I wasn't too keen on the slight supernatural theme but there is plenty of good things for any post-apocalypse fan.

    It's not trashy Outbreak or Mad Max mohawks and studded leather. The heavy focus on warfare and farming gets a little tiring. But not enough from stoping me from reading the next two books in the series.

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • Deleted user 21 April 2009 10:24:23
    Watchmen, does that count? 10/10
  • Stickman 21 Apr 2009 10:25:24 29,663 posts
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    Angels and Demons by Dan Brown
    10/10. A riproaring read.

    PS - How can you have a 'rate' thread without a rating in the first post? :)

    THIS SPACE FOR RENT

  • Tonka 21 Apr 2009 10:27:15 20,025 posts
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    Stickman wrote:
    PS - How can you have a 'rate' thread without a rating in the first post? :)

    I'm an avid EDGE fan.

    If you can read this you really need to fiddle with your forum settings.

  • StringBeanJean 21 Apr 2009 10:28:07 1,777 posts
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    The Damned United: 10/10

    Astonishing.
  • HarryPalmer 21 Apr 2009 10:28:16 3,123 posts
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    Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World by Haruki Murakami

    10/10

    Amazingly affecting and entertaining. Anyone who likes Japan, film noir, pulp fiction (the genre), or surrealism should read this, it's awesome.

    Apathy and Other Small Victories by Paul Neilan

    2/10

    Shite
  • Dougs 21 Apr 2009 10:29:21 66,725 posts
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    Cross Country by James Patterson

    The gazillionth novel in the Alex Cross series. As entertaining and readable as ever, with Cross yet again doing battle with the scum on the streets of Washington. Or rather, Nigeria in this case. Never tire of them, my only gripe is the casting for the film versions of Mr Cross. Morgan Freeman is not late 30s who gets the tidy girls.

    9/10
  • andywilkie35 21 Apr 2009 10:30:49 5,338 posts
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    StringBeanJean wrote:
    The Damned United: 10/10

    Astonishing.

    Ooh that's next on my list. I will take your review as "official" and expect a marvellous read

    PSN ID & Xbox Gamertag: Wedjwants

  • DUFFMAN5 21 Apr 2009 10:31:27 14,438 posts
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    Watch my back, only just started but good at the moment.

    "Duffman is thrusting in the direction of the problem! Oh, yeah!"

  • FHUTA 21 Apr 2009 10:36:23 880 posts
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    Carter Beats the Devil

    Cracking yarn, well written and dripping with incidental historical curios.

    8/10 (for the oft confused that's of course a very good score)
  • Stickman 21 Apr 2009 10:39:39 29,663 posts
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    On a serious note, Pies & Prejudice - Stuart Maconie

    Pleasant meanderings in the North by someone with a lovely dry wit and a clear love for the history and smaller details of life oop north. Well worth a read, even by softie southern poofs.

    THIS SPACE FOR RENT

  • PearOfAnguish 21 Apr 2009 10:40:19 7,151 posts
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    Across Realtime by Vernor Vinge - 9/10
    It's two books in one - The Peace War and Marooned in Realtime. Peace War is a little to slow to start with but still great, Marooned in Realtime is epic.
  • Deleted user 21 April 2009 10:42:43
    That Terminator 4 prequel thingy I won.

    It was pretty awful, but full of Terminatory goodness that is at least making me want to see the film, so job done from a commercial viewpoint. Wavering between a 5/6.
  • kalel 21 Apr 2009 10:44:39 86,421 posts
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    The Road by Cormack McCarthy.

    Very good indeed. Almost sickeningly so. A solid 9/10.
  • PES_Fanboy 21 Apr 2009 10:47:24 13,707 posts
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    World War Z by Max Brooks - PleaseDon'tLetTheUpcomingMovieBeGay/10, zombies pwn.
  • kalel 21 Apr 2009 10:55:27 86,421 posts
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    PES_Fanboy wrote:
    World War Z by Max Brooks - PleaseDon'tLetTheUpcomingMovieBeGay/10, zombies pwn.

    I only realised at the end that Max Brooks is the son if Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft. Irrelevent but interesting.
  • Deleted user 21 April 2009 10:58:32
    I keep changing my mind about WWZ. I won't deny that it is very entertaining, but at the same time I kept thinking that the whole thing was basically Max Brooks going 'I KNOW LOTS ABOUT ZOMBIES' and little else. I do sometimes wonder if there wasn't a touch of nepotism going on to get it published.

    But yeah, still entertaining enough.
  • Skandalle 21 Apr 2009 10:58:46 4 posts
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    The Birthing house by Christopher Ransom, apparently his first novel release and unfortunatley it kind of shows. it did have a few bits that get you thinking, and a few scares, but storywise it just seems to plod along aimlessly (especially towards the end...big let down) 5/10
  • kalel 21 Apr 2009 11:01:34 86,421 posts
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    Gremmi wrote:
    I keep changing my mind about WWZ. I won't deny that it is very entertaining, but at the same time I kept thinking that the whole thing was basically Max Brooks going 'I KNOW LOTS ABOUT ZOMBIES' and little else. I do sometimes wonder if there wasn't a touch of nepotism going on to get it published.

    But yeah, still entertaining enough.

    If there had been nepotism it would have been with getting the Zombie Survival Guide published, but the success of that guaranteed WWZ getting released.

    I think both are not that great, but he does take an interesting approach to writing zombie books at least, although yes, they are a bit heavy on the ‘I know lots about zombies’ front. A third book would definitely be pushing it.
  • PES_Fanboy 21 Apr 2009 11:07:13 13,707 posts
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    He used to write for SNL, I doubt any nepotism was from his parents in regards to his novels.
  • Murbal 21 Apr 2009 11:13:39 21,942 posts
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    Dearly Devoted Dexter (second of the books that the series is based upon) - 7/10

    Read in a weekend which is unusual for me; compulsive reading.
  • glaeken 21 Apr 2009 11:29:00 11,108 posts
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    Tonka wrote:
    Dies the Fire by S. M. Stirling
    A post-apocalyptic tale with a heavy focus on medieval warfare. All technology is broken by some strange unexplained phenomenon. Even gunpowder and steam engines cease to function. I wasn't too keen on the slight supernatural theme but there is plenty of good things for any post-apocalypse fan.

    It's not trashy Outbreak or Mad Max mohawks and studded leather. The heavy focus on warfare and farming gets a little tiring. But not enough from stoping me from reading the next two books in the series.

    There are quite a few books in that series and I would thoroughly recommended them for any post-apocalypse fans or people who are into ancient warfare methods/depictions.

    The supernatural elements actually get stronger as the series progresses but I believe the author is trying to show how new religious beliefs might arise as for the most part its what people believe rather than any actual supernatural happenings.

    I actually really liked the focus on warfare and farming as he really does get into the specifics of what is required to support a primitive medieval type level of society. I do like my history though so for me this aspect of the books is a strength.
  • FHUTA 21 Apr 2009 11:33:21 880 posts
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    Murbal wrote:
    Dearly Devoted Dexter (second of the books that the series is based upon) - 7/10

    Read in a weekend which is unusual for me; compulsive reading.

    just save yourself the trauma of reading the third book - it's pretty bad and kind of belittles the interesting things in the first two.

    not that the first two are great - interesting premise and characters, but ever so slight and with little charm to the writing quality. (though I did read all three in about a week so they are a bit moreish, just nowhere near as well written as the spin-off TV series)
  • PearOfAnguish 21 Apr 2009 11:35:50 7,151 posts
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    I've not read Dies the Fire, but it is a spin-off from his Island in the Sea of Time trilogy, where Nantucket gets sent back in time dumping 20th century civilization and technology thousands of years in the past. That's good fun.
  • pjmaybe 21 Apr 2009 11:36:43 70,676 posts
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    Hated the Dexter novels. A case of the telly series being better than the books. A rare case.

    Don't cry for me, Aberystwyth - 9/10

    Malcolm Wright really nailed Louis Knight in this book. Showed that he's not just some pussy gumshoe, but can actually be a bit of a nasty piece of work too. Also, Herod Jenkins is a fucking awesome evil bastard. Absolutely love these books to bits, glad the new one is on its way.
  • glaeken 21 Apr 2009 12:44:01 11,108 posts
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    PearOfAnguish wrote:
    I've not read Dies the Fire, but it is a spin-off from his Island in the Sea of Time trilogy, where Nantucket gets sent back in time dumping 20th century civilization and technology thousands of years in the past. That's good fun.

    I did not know that. That makes perfect sense as the book I am up to Nantucket is starting to be mentioned as a source of the problem. I don't remember anything in the books refering to this being part of another series though so I will have to look out for them.

    I think Stirling is actually up to book 5 now in the Dies the Fire series so it actually sounds like there are more books in the spin off than the original.
  • Articulate-Troll 21 Apr 2009 12:56:49 3,104 posts
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    The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

    If I was to compare to his only other book that I've read - Blood Meridian - I'd say it has a little less depth but is a lot more readable. Didn't really understand the Christian metaphors in either; there's clearly a lot going in his books below the surface that's quite intangible if you don't stop to think about it. Still, probably the best book I've read this year.
  • pistol 21 Apr 2009 13:01:15 13,019 posts
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    Cass, about the leader of the West Ham Firm that they recently made a film about. Some interesting bits but generally it's stuff I've read before. Average to say the least.
  • DUFFMAN5 21 Apr 2009 13:03:58 14,438 posts
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    Dissolution, Dark Fire, Sovereign, Revelation all by CJ Sansom

    All about Matthew Shardlake, a lawyer in Tudor England who solves mysteries for Thomas Cromwell among others, excellent reading.
    So scores: 10, 9, 10, 8

    "Duffman is thrusting in the direction of the problem! Oh, yeah!"

  • Dougs 21 Apr 2009 13:31:07 66,725 posts
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    FHUTA wrote:

    just save yourself the trauma of reading the third book - it's pretty bad and kind of belittles the interesting things in the first two.

    not that the first two are great - interesting premise and characters, but ever so slight and with little charm to the writing quality. (though I did read all three in about a week so they are a bit moreish, just nowhere near as well written as the spin-off TV series)

    Nonsense imo. The 3rd is just very different and less about him as someone going about murdering people, and more about what makes him tick. I prefer the books myself, the TV shows are too drawn out and have daft sub-plots that are utterly irrelevant.

    Doesn't mean I'm not looking forward to the new series on Friday though (in HD too!)
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