Learning to play the guitar... Page 26

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  • FWB 28 Jul 2010 15:30:30 41,992 posts
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    I can't praise it (the Pod) enough. It cuts out latency plus has tons of fun to mess around with. Can link you some stuff I've recorded on it too, if you like. ;)
  • Fab4 28 Jul 2010 15:30:55 5,695 posts
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    KingOfSpain wrote:
    Cool thanks Fab, I'll check out that site, it look interesting.

    FWB, that's the amp I was looking at before I posted here, I will check out the Line6 Pod too. Thanks

    No worries. Just stay away from the Harley Benton ones...whether that be amps, guitars, power supplies...whatever they make, stay away from them ;)
  • KingOfSpain 28 Jul 2010 15:32:30 5,182 posts
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    FWB wrote:
    I can't praise it (the Pod) enough. It cuts out latency plus has tons of fun to mess around with. Can link you some stuff I've recorded on it too, if you like. ;)

    That would be cracking. It's always cool to hear new stuff!
  • crispyduckman 3 Aug 2010 13:01:45 1,846 posts
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    I'm a pretty serious guitarist and have a couple of valve Orange amps and a couple of valve Fenders and pedals all over the place. I still have a Pod Pocket Express for messing around with and not disturbing neighbours/girlfriend. Highly recommended and it's knob based (not buttons) so nice and simple to use (although lack of EQ is a pain).

    You could also try the Line 6 spider amp as it's basically a Pod with a speaker. I haven't played a non-valve amp in a long time but I think these are probably a safe bet. Get the 15 watt version for 70. Any more power is probably a waste.

    IMO, there's no such thing as an entry level or starter valve amp, as you should keep coming back to even the smallest (see Jeff Beck and his Fender Champ). It'll be an instrument for life but you prob need to spend about 300 for that though (FYI, I recommend the Blackstar HT-5).

    PSN/XBL/Steam/Origin: crispyduckman

  • roz123 5 Aug 2010 15:12:58 7,107 posts
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    Just been learning the Rain song by Led Zepp. Its a funny tuning but a gorgeous song to play

    Tab: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/l/led_zeppelin/the_rain_song_tab.htm
    Song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TvuY0XDt-g&feature=related
  • StixxUK 12 Sep 2010 21:11:58 7,173 posts
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    Possibly a really stupid question, but do I need a special strap for an acoustic guitar? It only seems to have one peg (at the very back).
  • Pinky_Floyd 12 Sep 2010 21:21:48 6,428 posts
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    If it only has a peg at the back then you can get a shoe string, loop it around the headstock just behind the nut, then tie it to one end of the strap. Works a treat.
  • sirtacos 16 Oct 2010 08:33:50 7,205 posts
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    I just learned "One of These Things First" by Nick Drake. My right hand is a bleeding stump but I just can't stop playing it. :)
    It's an awesome fingerpicking exercise, too... which is good, because I'll need the practice before tackling 'Road' (which I'm sure I'll be able to play after about a year's worth of repetition)...

    I highly recommend this guy's music. The fact that he died almost completely unknown is a fucking crime.

    edit: this is probably old news to everyone else, but I just discovered the guy so I can't help but be a bit overzealous.
  • Deleted user 25 November 2010 10:47:24
    Post deleted
  • DUFFMAN5 28 Dec 2010 12:23:57 13,816 posts
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    Right you axe gods I need me a program to start (restart...again!) playing guitar. I can play very basic chords but not much else.

    To the chaps that play to an ok standard, how long do you practice and what sort of structure does it take. I need help with a/any program.

    I think my problem has always been that I get sidetracked to easily, so never stick at learning a song/tune.

    I have had my guitars for 10 years and can barely play anything, I know that is piss poor, but I want to start afresh, New Year and all that, so any advice from you axe gods would be really welcome.

    "Duffman is thrusting in the direction of the problem! Oh, yeah!"

  • Pinky_Floyd 28 Dec 2010 23:14:34 6,428 posts
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    Google Justin sandercoe.

    That's all you will need for months.

    Have fun!
  • angeltreats 3 Jan 2011 09:52:55 2,602 posts
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    Pinky_Floyd wrote:
    Google Justin sandercoe.

    That's all you will need for months.

    Have fun!

    I want to say a big THANKS for this post! I googled Justin Sandercoe and dived in to the intermediate lessons, he's taught me Wish You Were Here absolutely painlessly :D Some fantastic stuff on that site.
  • Pinky_Floyd 3 Jan 2011 10:40:54 6,428 posts
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    Been playing 2 years and still dip into his stuff, he is a great player and a great teacher.
  • Deleted user 6 January 2011 20:19:14
    I think I need a private tutor. I've had a guitar for ages and just cannot play. I don't want to be good. I just want to be able to strum a few britpop songs to myself. I want to learn via songs, not by boring rubbish.
  • angeltreats 6 Jan 2011 20:39:58 2,602 posts
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    I'm currently trying to organise some private lessons, I'm fed up with never really getting any better and I really want to be able to play more stuff on my lovely new guitar.

    The guy I'm hopefully going to have lessons from charges 15 for half an hour - all the tutors whose websites I looked at seemed to charge between 12.50 and 15 for half an hour.
  • Deleted user 7 January 2011 10:39:12
    That's more then driving lessons.
  • PiersMorgan 16 Jan 2011 14:53:48 25 posts
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    My lessons are only costing me 15 for an hour! And he almost always goes over to around an hour and a half.

    Going pretty well so far, trying to do it properly really. Mastered Basic Chords/changing between chords. Now trying to master Bar Chords/changing from bar chords to open(?) chords.

    Great fun so far, learnt a few songs to keep me entertained through mastering the basics and I find myself picking it up and having a strum rather than turn on the TV nowadays which is great. Great thread btw, some great advice and it's nice to know someone else is struggling with the same things I struggle with.
  • Fab4 16 Jan 2011 14:59:54 5,695 posts
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    What do they actually teach you in the 90 minutes? Does he he show you chord shapes and then watches you attempt to play them?

    I'm asking because I've never took lessons, and I'm curious.
  • Mr_Sleep 16 Jan 2011 15:02:25 16,267 posts
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    PiersMorgan wrote:
    My lessons are only costing me 15 for an hour! And he almost always goes over to around an hour and a half.

    Going pretty well so far, trying to do it properly really. Mastered Basic Chords/changing between chords. Now trying to master Bar Chords/changing from bar chords to open(?) chords.

    Great fun so far, learnt a few songs to keep me entertained through mastering the basics and I find myself picking it up and having a strum rather than turn on the TV nowadays which is great. Great thread btw, some great advice and it's nice to know someone else is struggling with the same things I struggle with.

    Just as a note, it's generally spelt barre chords, not bar chords. Although apparently you can also use bar. Barre chords are a good thing to learn as it allows for more chord choices and dynamism. They're very hard to do for some people though. The best piece of advice I was given is to resist the temptation to put too much pressure on the fret board with your index finger/thumb as it soon leads to fatigue. It can be hard with a high action though.

    You are a factory of sadness.

  • thefilthandthefury 16 Jan 2011 15:05:48 24,901 posts
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    How do people actually learn on their own? Most of my friends play and when I ask them they just say "oh, I learned by playing along to songs I like" but I can't actually conceive of how to do that. Surely you can't go from nothing, to playing along with music just like that. To me, a musical fool, half the strings sound the bloody same :D
  • PiersMorgan 16 Jan 2011 15:13:41 25 posts
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    Fab4 wrote:
    What do they actually teach you in the 90 minutes? Does he he show you chord shapes and then watches you attempt to play them?

    I'm asking because I've never took lessons, and I'm curious.

    Basically he'll show me, watch me, advise me and then answer any questions I have.

    For example my last lesson I learnt Barre chords (Cheers Mr Sleep ;)). To begin with he showed me the chords and how to do them and then kinda showed me how they should sound and some examples of songs that use them. That takes around 10-15 mins. Then I attempt them and try and perfect them whilst he shows me what I'm doing wrong/how to perfect them. That takes around 30 mins. He then taught me a bit of theory for 15 minutes and after that he answered any questions I had about anything to do with guitar for about 20 mins. Then he'll set me some stuff to practise and show me how to do that, then we discuss the lesson for a bit.

    It's certainly been very beneficial and I think I'm lucky I've got such a great teacher, I'd definitely recommend you trying lessons.

    @ Mr Sleep: I was certainly doing that (putting too much pressure on the fret board with my thumb/index finger) to begin with but another advantage of having a teacher is he's there to tell me not to do that stuff. I found barre chords almost impossible at first until I put down my index finger last instead of first and then it became so much easier :D
  • Fab4 16 Jan 2011 15:17:31 5,695 posts
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    thefilthandthefury wrote:
    How do people actually learn on their own? Most of my friends play and when I ask them they just say "oh, I learned by playing along to songs I like" but I can't actually conceive of how to do that. Surely you can't go from nothing, to playing along with music just like that. To me, a musical fool, half the strings sound the bloody same :D

    I have, if I say it myself, a good musical ear. When I first started playing I learnt all the basic chords and was then able to match them to those played in songs just by listening.

    That only takes you so far though...massive mounts of 'noodling' helped me. Just trying different things and seeing how they sound. When I went on to self-study the theory I found out the names of things I'd found out by myself :-D

    I just wish I'd put more effort in during the middle 15 years of my 26 years of playing...I'd be a guitar god by now ;)
  • Mr_Sleep 16 Jan 2011 15:26:42 16,267 posts
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    PiersMorgan wrote:
    @ Mr Sleep: I was certainly doing that (putting too much pressure on the fret board with my thumb/index finger) to begin with but another advantage of having a teacher is he's there to tell me not to do that stuff. I found barre chords almost impossible at first until I put down my index finger last instead of first and then it became so much easier :D

    Yeah, it's quite useful to have people around to tell you what's going on. I just referred to some guitar mates I had but I can imagine lessons get things moving much quicker. I always did the barre first and then the chord, I think most people do it the way you describe at first but I think the barre first was because of trying to learn F with the index barreing the E and B string.

    I was always quite musical anyway, having played cello and piano before guitar, so I had a little grounding in music anyway. However, the ability to play musical instruments is innate to most everyone I'd have said, it's just that it requires a ridiculous amount of practice as you have to pretty much train your brain.

    I started by learning other people's stuff and playing with other people. Playing with other people improved my technique a great deal, little tips and just hearing and seeing how things are done is very important.

    You are a factory of sadness.

  • angeltreats 16 Jan 2011 15:44:47 2,602 posts
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    I played the cello too, and I was playing it by ear for three years before anyone discovered I couldn't actually read music. Which is probably quite good in a way because that it meant I had a good ear for music. Anyway now, aged 30, I'm trying to teach myself to read music without having to count the lines.

    My first guitar lesson the other day was great, he apparently taught me a load of music theory without me realising I was learning it. I didn't really even know what a chord was before. Now I do, and I know what a triad is, and what a seventh chord is and a diminished chord and a minor chord, and a pentatonic scale and an arpeggio, and I also learned that by learning the A minor pentatonic scale and then putting on a blues backing track in the key of A minor, you can jam along and sound half-decent while actually still being shit at the guitar. Oh and he taught me some hammer on and pull off type stuff, which I've never bothered to learn before. I enjoyed it hugely and came away feeling like I really wanted to go straight home and practice it all.

    Up until now I've taught myself lots of chords, including some barre chords, a few scales, a bit of rubbish fingerpicking but never managed to get beyond that. I still struggle when changing between different barre chords.

    Oh and I have this slightly bizarre goal of learning Moonlight Sonata. I've got the tab and can do about the first page or so, before it starts getting a bit more complicated, but my teacher reckons it looks like about Grade 6 standard so I'm not beating myself up that I didn't find it instantly easy :)
  • angeltreats 16 Jan 2011 15:46:19 2,602 posts
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    Also, how the hell do you train your fingers to stretch wider? I just can't seem to reach four frets at once.
  • Zerobob 16 Jan 2011 15:57:44 1,602 posts
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    angeltreats wrote:
    Also, how the hell do you train your fingers to stretch wider? I just can't seem to reach four frets at once.

    Yeah I have the same problem when annoyingly some great songs require you to stretch 3 fingers out over 5 frets quite low on the neck and I have fairly big hands. The starting arpeggios at the start of Tears In The Rain by Satriani for example. I end up just cheating and playing the open A string instead as the base note :s
  • Fab4 16 Jan 2011 15:59:25 5,695 posts
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    angeltreats wrote:
    Also, how the hell do you train your fingers to stretch wider? I just can't seem to reach four frets at once.

    Painfully boring repetition.

    You can build up finger independence away from the guitar though. For instance, place your fretting hand palm down on a flat surface. Then move your small finger as far away from the others, without moving the others. Hold it there, and then repeat for the others, keeping each finger in place after moving it. Then repeat in the other direction.

    You could also look up 'finger fitness' on Youtube. The guy's warm up exercises are very good for stretching the tendons.
  • Mr_Sleep 16 Jan 2011 16:00:15 16,267 posts
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    angeltreats wrote:
    My first guitar lesson the other day was great, he apparently taught me a load of music theory without me realising I was learning it. I didn't really even know what a chord was before. Now I do, and I know what a triad is, and what a seventh chord is and a diminished chord and a minor chord, and a pentatonic scale and an arpeggio, and I also learned that by learning the A minor pentatonic scale and then putting on a blues backing track in the key of A minor, you can jam along and sound half-decent while actually still being shit at the guitar. Oh and he taught me some hammer on and pull off type stuff, which I've never bothered to learn before. I enjoyed it hugely and came away feeling like I really wanted to go straight home and practice it all.

    Can you get him to explain a suspended chord and let me know, I'm still not sure.

    Heh, the pentatonic, the beginners friend. Seriously, I always recommend everyone learns that early as it is invaluable at first and is always useful for jamming with other people.

    I'm glad it's going well by the way, for the amount your paying he should be good and he does sound like he's leading yo uin the right direction.

    As for stretching fingers, well you just have to keep doing it until you can. Obviously there's limitations but I used to find some chords very difficult to perfect but with practice it all comes eventually. Always ask yourself, could a heroin soaked burn victim with arthritis play this chord? If so then it's doable by anyone. Not that I can play like Django Reinhardt.

    You are a factory of sadness.

  • Fab4 16 Jan 2011 16:09:37 5,695 posts
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    For stretching, try these exercises out...pdf of the exercises at bottom of page.

    http://www.andrewwasson.com/lessons/exercises/exercise_1.php

    Warning: Your fingers will burn ;)
  • PiersMorgan 29 Jan 2011 18:01:30 25 posts
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    Can anyone recommend a good theory book for complete beginners?
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