#4771134, By ploder ID cards scope creep (a good week to bury bad news)

  • ploder 22 May 2009 11:52:24 243 posts
    Seen 2 months ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    as the intended law is that it would be illegal not to have your ID card on you at all times.
    There is no indication at the present time that they will make it illegal not to have a card. Indeed, there is no need to carry a card once you get registered as your name can be punched into the new mobile biometric scanners being given to police and verified by your fingerprint. Google project Midas etc

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2008/oct/27/project-midas-fingerprint-scanner-liberty

    At present these devices are limited to 'scenes of incidents' but I am confident that function creep (e.g as with tasers being given to non-firearms officers) will ensure their widespread rollout.

    Of course it will be 'for our own good' and will be spun as reducing police form filling. And after all if you don't have 'anything to hide' do you? Do you see the fallacy in this adage?

    They are more canny than that and wish to slip it in gradually (like a drug dealer trying to get you hooked on his wares). However, the Gateway reviews which the Gov tried to supress showed that the police were in favour of mandatory ID cards and that the only thing stopping them from recommeding collection of DNA for the system was cost.

    The unspun intention is to link the NIR to as many areas of a subjects/citizen's life so that it becomes practically impossible to evade registration. The gov call this building a 'critical mass' and say it is good for us all obviously. Once/if this critical mass is built up then it is my opinion that this is when things will get really heavy for us refusing to be on this system.

    What's the problem? If you are a law abiding citizen who pays the correct tax and are not planning to commit any acts of terroism you have nothing to worry about. If how ever you are evading tax, commiting crimes, working illegally then obviously this would be a bad thing.

    The problem is that many of us do not want state owned biometric profiles held on us and consider it offensive when people smear us as 'supporting crime/being criminals' for merely opposing it. It is possible to oppose this system and not be a potential criminal/illegal/tax evader etc.

    Instead of smearing people that do not want it you should be asking the questions: 'what is the justification for such a system and is it convincing?' and 'can this government and future governments be trusted with such a system?' Until a convincing reason has been given for the ID cards system then those in favour fail.

    You also have to realise that such a system is a huge change in the way we will interact with the state and presents major privacy concerns:

    - The power is already in the law to allow any public service to be made conditional on registration to this system.
    - Information about you can be used at any time without your consent (including any biometrics taken) for the stated purposes (some of which is highlighted in my first post)
    - Being on the system is a lifelong obligation to make sure you report changes in any information taken on pain of up to 1,000 fines.
    - The system also features an all encompassing surveillance element where every use of your info is recorded in perpetuity. It follows from this that whenever you use the info (e.g solicitor, opening bank accounts etc) the gov will have a record. If you consider knowledge to be power then this system will supercharge the authority of the state over the individual.
    - As we have seen by these draft Orders the information that can be collected from you is not closed. All it requires is for the SofS to draft more orders and put them before Parliament and the 40+ pieces of info will increase.

    One of the ways the current gov is trying to justify the system is on the basis that it is 'voluntary'. This is highly dubious imo. If your freedom of movement (passport) and access to public services is dependent on registration then how can it be voluntary? You have effectively been coerced onto the system to get those 'benefits'. Rights (such as freedom of movement) are not bestowed by government, but are yours inherently and have to be recognised and respected by gov. We do not live our lives by the grace of the Labour party.
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