F1 2010: The Final Lap • Page 2

Codemasters answers our criticisms and starts talking 2011.

Eurogamer: When it comes to making F1 2011, where do you think you've got the most work to do?

Stephen Hood: Well, everywhere, but honestly... certainly the media side, Live the Life.

Paul Jeal: Yeah, Live the Life and multiplayer, just because we've had to invest that much time in the first one on the career, the meat and bones, the driving, the pit-stops, the weather. We had some great ideas which have been fairly well stripped back in development for both Live the Life and multiplayer.

But being the perfectionists that we are, we want to move every element of the "Be the Driver" side forward as well, the AI, the handling model, we've got some ideas for what we want to do there.

Stephen Hood: I love working on these sorts of games, but one of the big frustrations is, the bigger the team, the more complicated it becomes. What people often don't see is, behind the scenes, you're trying to make a game out of the resources you have available, be that the time or the people you have working on the team. You're trying to balance some things accordingly; you can't be everywhere all the time.

Considering the scope of the game that we were given at the start, which I think was pretty massive... If I was trying to make the perfect game, I'd probably say the on-track stuff is most important, then build up Live the Life in the future. But I think we realised early on that Formula One games have been the same for a really long time and we needed to come back and do something different.

But that was so difficult, and we were devving up until the final few days, which was pretty mental really; people were really panicking, but we were saying look, we've got to get this final bit in.

F1 2010 vs real life - spot the difference.

Eurogamer: It's fair to say we agree that the Live the Life side is definitely less convincing... I was going to ask if you felt you just didn't quite have the time and resources to do it justice?

Paul Jeal: A bit of both, really. There's a lot of stuff in there where I think we just ran out of the UI time. There's stuff in there which we just don't wave in the player's face as much as we should. That's almost slightly more disappointing, because it's there, but how many people are going to be able to get to it?

Stephen Hood: An example: a lot of the media stuff runs off this criteria system - has the guy won the race, has he done this, has he done that, and that sparks the questions ... we've only got about 25 per cent put in there. So sometimes Paul and I can go into those interviews and it's hard for us, because we know how it's meant to be working. It's disappointing for us when we haven't quite reached that level.

It's like having a book, you just rip the pages out of the book, and it doesn't quite hang together. So for '11, we're planning it out. We're saying these are the core features, these are absolutely essential, the game will hang together if we have these things in. Everything else will be considered a bonus. That's what we haven't done in '10. And we also know the team - we know where we're really strong.

There was certainly a point where we thought, we're never going to get this game out. It was never going to happen. But it did, and I'm really pleased we managed to get it out. And I personally would buy it even if it was just for multiplayer.

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